Psychology Online Certificate Course

Learn About Greater Knowledge Of Feelings, Abilities And Personalities

Psychology Online Certificate Course

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Study Psychology Online Courses and Gain Greater Knowledge of Feelings, Abilities and Personalities

Our Psychology Online Course will help you understand feelings, skills, and personalities better. Psychology is not just a discipline and a profession, but its principles may be applied to everyday life. Most students report that their employment, family, and social lives improved due to their studies. Psychology is a mental process. It is a science that requires researchers to ask specific questions about a topic before putting their theories to the test. It is challenging to define psychology. It is a broad phrase that refers to a wide range of topics in science and technology.

A group of scientists and philosophers from diverse backgrounds tried to explain the thoughts and behaviours of various living organisms, from the most rudimentary to the most sophisticated. Psychology is sometimes referred to as the "science of the mind" because of its philosophical and physiological foundations. Your initial response to this question will most likely be considerably different from the image of psychology that will develop as you progress through this course. You might be shocked to learn that psychology encompasses much more than just analyzing individuals and making a psychological diagnosis for emotional issues. It is also about how humans see colour, how stress impacts our biological processes, and why newborns cry when away from their caregivers.

What you will learn with our Psychology Online Course

  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Human Emotion
  • Personality
  • Perception
  • Prejudice and Discrimination
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Attachment
  • Trauma and Grieving
  • Intelligence
  • Stress
  • Careers in Psychology

Course Fast Facts:

  1. Learn the fundamentals of Psychology 
  2. Written and developed by leading Psychology experts
  3. Unlimited, lifetime access to online course
  4. Certificate of completion awarded with passing score for the online assessment
  5. Study at your own pace with no rigid class timetables, 24/7 from any computer or smart device

Psychology Online Course Outline

Module 1: Introduction to Psychology

This introductory subject will define psychology and look at how it's changed over time. The study of the mind and behaviour is known as psychology. It includes the mental processes, biological effects, and societal forces that impact people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviours. Psychologists and other mental health practitioners employ scientific knowledge to assist individuals in overcoming barriers and making better decisions in their daily lives.

Major Subsets of Psychology

Clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, behavioural psychology, and biopsychology are the four main branches of psychology.

Break from Philosophy

Psychology was once considered a branch of philosophy. This lasted until the nineteenth century, when German scientists Johannes P. Muller, Hermann von Helmholtz, and Gustav Fechner proved that mental processes could be explored scientifically.

Structuralism

Wundt was fascinated by breaking down the structure of the mind into smaller pieces and researching consciousness through experimental approaches such as introspection. The structuralism school of thinking was founded on this method.

Functionalism

William James, an American physician with a background in philosophy, rose to prominence as one of the country's leading psychologists in the mid-to late-nineteenth century. For the first time in the United States, James began teaching psychology as a separate course in 1875.

Psychoanalysis

Early psychology had focused on conscious human experience up to this point. This changed when Sigmund Freud, an Austrian neuropathologist, proposed a theory of human behaviour that stressed the unconscious mind's role. This idea was known as psychoanalysis, and it was both a method of mental disease treatment and a personality theory. Patients suffering from hysteria and other disorders piqued Freud's interest.

Behaviourism

John B. Watson, a functionalism-trained psychologist, revolutionized psychology in 1913 when he described behaviourism, a new approach to the profession. True psychology, according to Watson, is the study of observable and objective behaviour.

Humanistic Psychology

Psychoanalysis and behaviourism dominated psychology in the first half of the twentieth century. However, a new school of thinking known as humanistic psychology emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. In psychology, this school of thought is known as the "third force." This "third force" examines how people reach their full potential. Humanistic psychology was primarily established by psychologists Abraham Maslow and Carl Rodgers.

Cognitive Psychology

In the 1950s and 1960s, psychologists realized that they needed to look at internal mental processes to understand behaviour, which sparked a movement known as the cognitive revolution in psychology.

Module 2: Developmental Psychology

We will go through developmental psychology in great detail in this subject. Humans go through distinct stages of life at different times, and psychologists can examine the behaviours and challenges that arise during each of these stages to help people and better their lives. We will look at some significant figures in developmental psychology and describe the field. We will also look at some of the most common problems developmentalists can help with.

Defining Developmental Psychology

As previously said, humans are continually evolving, and it is a psychologist's role to learn about these changes and explain why they may occur. Even ordinary or expected changes can significantly impact a person's life as they get older. Psychologists can identify and act early in a child's development. Although some psychologists specialize in certain age groups, they can work with people of all ages in general.

Stages in Developmental Psychology

To better understand developmental psychology, it is necessary first to comprehend the many stages of life and how psychologists can assist people experiencing difficulties during these times.

Prenatal

Psychologists are particularly interested in the perinatal period, as they believe that many early reflexes are formed before birth. Similarly, various issues might occur during this time due to factors such as maternal medicines or genetic disorders.

Early Childhood

This is when there has been a lot of noticeable growth and change. Various types of growth, such as physical, cognitive, and emotional growth, are frequently studied by psychologists at this time.

Middle Childhood

Children begin to develop more distinct and well-rounded personalities throughout this time. They start to develop social skills, make friends, and grow.

Adolescence

For psychologists, this time is exciting because children begin to see themselves as active members of society and their environment. During this time, many people are forming their identities.

Early Adulthood

People build ties and connections during this time that often last a lifetime. As a result, connection, closeness, connectedness, and the formation of a family are common themes at this time.

Middle Adulthood

During this time, people frequently experience substantial life conflicts. They are more likely to think about and reflect on their life objectives and purpose during this stage.

Older Adults

During this time, most people have health concerns. Some people live well into their 80s and 90s, while others have difficulty. Apart from physical decline, dementia can be a problem for older people.

Key Figures and Theories

Over the years, three crucial figures in developmental psychology have been enormously influential: Jean Piaget (1896–1980), Lev Vygotsky (1896–1934), and John Bowlby (1907–1990). Each of these thinkers made a substantial contribution to the area. The work and conclusions of these people have impacted much contemporary research on this subject.

Focus Areas   

  • Guiding cognitive development during childhood and later stages of life
  • Overcoming developmental challenges and learning disabilities
  • Developing emotional intelligence
  • Aiding language acquisition

Module 3: Social Psychology

We will look into social psychology in this module—social psychology studies how society and social interactions influence human behaviour.

Scope of the Field

This field of study is founded on the concept that people react differently when alone and when they are in a group. When interacting with diverse groups, a person's mental process, capacity to define goals and ability to attain those goals may vary.

Benefits

  • Treating aggression and relationship issues
  • Improving cooperation, competition, and collective thinking in organizations
  • Informing workplace elements such as leadership, cohesion, and intolerance
  • Understanding the relationship between mental health and level of achievement

Drawbacks

  • Social behaviour is a complex mechanism controlled by several factors. Studies can reveal only the most minuscule fraction of these factors. As a result, studies in social psychology are often small to moderate compared to other fields.
  • So far, existing studies on this topic only have a generalized approach towards human behaviour, which underestimates individual differences.

Major Theories 

Social psychologists have developed various hypotheses by examining human interactions and behavior over lengthy periods.

  • Attribution theory
  • Attachment theory
  • Cognitive dissonance theory
  • Learning theory
  • Self-affirmation theory
  • Social identity theory
  • Social facilitation theory

Case Study: Bandura's Social Learning Theory

The teacher saw Ms A's hesitancy and lack of reaction in Language Arts class, so she wrote a case study about her. Ms A's behaviour was said to have lasted over a week. Ms A cannot pass this course because she finds literature challenging to comprehend.

Case Study: Zimbardo Stanford Prison Experiment

In 1973, Zimbardo and his collaborators devised this experiment. It was conducted on students who consented to participate in a fictitious prison scenario. The roles of detainees and guards were given to students at random. The inmates were kidnapped from their houses and transported to Stanford University's experimental prison, assigned identity numbers.

Module 4: Human Emotion

The spectrum of human emotion and the various ideas that characterize what emotions are will be discussed in Module 4. An overview of elements that can alter emotional processing will be included.

What is an emotion?

A mental state that mirrors specific physiological changes is an emotion. Subjective cognitive states that develop in reaction to inputs are also known as emotions. However, it is impossible to pin down a clear meaning of emotion. Experiences, assessments, and dispositions are all ways to think about emotions. We can take action, make judgments, avoid dangerous circumstances, and survive because of our emotions. They also aid in our mutual comprehension.

Biological Foundations

A ventral and dorsal neural system is thought to form affective states and emotional behaviour. The amygdala, anterior insula, ventral anterior cingulate cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex are all part of the ventral system. It is engaged in detecting emotional responses to stimuli in the environment, creating affective states, and automatically regulating emotional responses.

How the Brain Processes Emotion

The limbic system is a brain region that is heavily engaged in how we perceive emotion. The limbic system includes the amygdala, hypothalamus, and hippocampus, among other brain regions. To identify and process emotions, all of these structures operate together.

  • The sensory information about emotion-evoking events goes to the thalamus. 
  • It moves along the pathways from the thalamus to the amygdala and the cortex. 
  • The amygdala gets activated before the cortex and processes the information quickly.

Interference

Personal and environmental factors can affect how the brain perceives and processes emotional information. Individuals may find it challenging to control their emotions or cope with emotional stimulation due to these factors.

Mental Illness

Emotion experience, emotion management, and emotional expression are impaired in people with schizophrenia and mood disorders such as major depression.

Stress and Fatigue

Emotion regulation is weakened by mental exhaustion or the loss of cognitive resources. The amygdala is recognized for its heightened sensitivity to stressful situations. The secretion of amygdala neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA, noradrenaline, and serotonin increases during stressful times. Following stressful events, neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala act differently.

Medication and Substances

The functioning of several circuits in the brain can be altered by long-term drug usage. Prescription medicines are included in this. Dopamine receptors in the brain become less sensitive due to drugs that generate excessive dopamine release. This happens when the brain develops a natural resistance and the number of dopamine-transmitting cells decreases.

Hormones

Hormones are molecules secreted by endocrine glands that affect physical, physiological, and behavioural changes in the body, as you may recall. This can result in various conditions, some of which are emotional.

Neurodivergent Conditions

Emotional dysregulation is a feature of neurodivergent diseases, including ADHD and autism spectrum disorder. Differences in the amygdala, ventral striatum, and orbitofrontal cortex generate emotional problems.

Module 5: Personality

The idea of personality is the focus of this section of the course. Personality refers to a person's distinctive manner of thinking, feeling, and acting as defined by psychology. Every individual has a distinct personality. We all have unique characteristics and patterns that determine how we react to external and internal stimuli.

Individual Personalities

While there are numerous ideas around the concept of personality, it is widely accepted that a person's personality remains consistent throughout their lives and cannot be readily changed. While personality is a psychological construct, it is also influenced by biological processes and urges. Not only does our behaviour represent our personality, but so do our thoughts, feelings, relationships, and interactions with others.

Type Theories

According to type theories, personality is shaped mainly by biological elements, and there are several different personality types.

  • Type A
  • Type B
  • Type C
  • Type D

Trait Theories

Personality is viewed as a collection of genetically based internal qualities in trait theories.

  • Agreeable
  • Conscientious
  • Eager to please
  • Extraversion
  • Introversion
  • Neurotic

Psychodynamic Theories

Sigmund Freud's work inspired psychodynamic theories. They claim that the unconscious mind significantly impacts one's personality.

Behavioural theories

Environmental effects, according to behavioural theories, shape a person's personality. Behavioural theorists frequently overlook internal emotions and thoughts.

Dimensions of Personality

Many current psychologists feel that the big five personality traits are the essential building blocks of a person's personality. The five personality dimensions, according to researchers, are universal.

Openness

This personality attribute is characterized by creativity and understanding. People that are open to new experiences are more creative and eager to attempt new things. They enjoy taking on new problems and are content to ponder abstractly.

Conscientiousness 

This dimension is characterized by high attentiveness, attention to detail, and a penchant for a defined schedule. Conscientious people want to plan ahead of time, do critical activities swiftly, and consider how their actions affect others.

Extroversion

Extroversion is defined by sociability, aggressiveness, talkativeness, and emotional expressiveness. People with a high level of this attribute are outgoing, exuberant, and energetic in social situations.

Agreeableness

Altruism, trust, affection, and kindness are linked with this personality type. High agreeableness is associated with prosocial conduct, empathy, and concern for others. They are genuinely interested in people and like assisting them. They are usually cooperative and like contributing to the enjoyment of others.

Neuroticism

Sadness, moodiness, and irritation are all aspects of this dimension. Those with high levels of this attribute are emotionally unstable, with anxiety and a proclivity for getting agitated. They are easily stressed and tend to worry about minor matters.

Personality Testing

Personality testing employs various methods to assess the attribute patterns that people exhibit in various settings. Self-report inventories, in which the test-taker rates how well questions or statements related to them, and projective tests, in which the test-taker responds to an object or situation, are the two primary forms of personality testing.

Personality Changes

Psychologists are generally in agreement that personality does not change over time. Maturity, on the other hand, may bring about specific changes.

Module 6: Perception

We will cover perception and how it connects to psychology in Module 6. Perception is our sensory experience of the world. While our senses acquire data from our surroundings, perception describes how we experience, organize, and interpret that data. This not only allows us to interact with our surroundings, but it also helps us to survive in them.

Types of Perception

The five senses of sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch are part of perception. Proprioception, or our ability to notice changes in bodily movements and positions, is also included. Perception is also used in the cognitive process of digesting the information we receive, such as recognizing a relative's face or hearing a familiar tune.

The Perceptual Process

A person's perceptual process is a set of psychological stages used to choose, organize, and interpret stimuli. This happens all the time, despite most people being unaware of the natural mechanism involved in detecting stimuli.

Disorders Involving Perception

Cognitive problems can hamper the perceptual process. The ability to comprehend things or concepts is compromised in several perceptual diseases.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia alters the brain's functions, resulting in a distorted perspective of reality. This type of mental disorder is frequently a lifelong problem. On the other hand, the treatment allows people to manage their symptoms and live whole, active lives. Hallucinations, delusions, inability to express emotions, and abnormal thoughts and behaviours are common symptoms of schizophrenia.

Aphantasia

Aphantasia is the inability to visualize visuals in people. Aphantasia sufferers cannot imagine anything in their heads, unlike most people who can recall a scene or a face.

Prosopagnosia

Face blindness, or prosopagnosia, is a condition in which people cannot identify other people's faces. They are unable to recognize family and friends as a result of this.

Spatial Neglect Syndrome

After a brain injury, spatial neglect syndrome develops, resulting in an inability to attend to stimuli on one side of the body. They may, however, have no loss of sensation on the side that has been neglected.

Module 7: Prejudice and Discrimination

This unit explores the differences between prejudice and discrimination and their psychological underpinnings. You will also learn about the various sorts of prejudice and bias in the mental health field.

Defining Prejudice and Discrimination

Many people make the blunder of conflating the terms prejudice and discrimination. However, there is a significant contrast between the two notions in psychology.

Forms of Discrimination

Discrimination can manifest itself in a variety of ways. As previously stated, it can be motivated by a variety of factors, including gender (sexism, transphobia), race (racism), age (ageism), sexual identity (homophobia, biphobia), ethnicity (xenophobia), and many others. Discrimination can occur in various forms, including direct or indirect prejudice, as well as individual and institutional discrimination. While all types of prejudice are wrong, some are more subtle than others and have far-reaching ramifications.

Psychological Basis

According to both traditional and recent research, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination are all caused by social interaction and communication. According to the research, they are more vital towards social groups more away from the subject demonstrating biased or discriminating conduct. While social scientists continue to research what causes people to have such attitudes, it is widely agreed that social norms play a significant role. Ralph D. Minard performed a study in West Virginia in 1952 on prejudice and discrimination among white and black coal miners.

Module 8: Learning

This session will look at how and why people learn. Psychology, being a mind-and-behaviour science, also looks into how people learn and remember things. When this topic is discussed, images of young children in schools immediately appear. While learning psychology as a branch has made significant contributions to modern teaching methods, it also includes adult learning as a continuous process.

Classical Conditioning

Simply described, classical conditioning is the process of learning through association. In the discipline, the renowned experiment done by Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov in the late 1800s has established a standard. In popular culture, "Pavlov's dog" has become synonymous with conditional learning. When dogs saw food, they salivated, which they later connected with lab employees entering their room, according to Pavlov. When they saw them, they started salivating as well.

Operant Conditioning

B.F. Skinner is a behaviourist from the United States. Skinner expanded on Pavlov's conditioning by pointing out that consequences (both positive and negative) influence which behaviours are taught. This is not to say that classical conditioning is incorrect; instead, it is another learning method. Operant conditioning, often known as Skinnerian conditioning after its originator, describes how associations between a particular behaviour and its consequences determine whether or not that behaviour is repeated in the future. Skinner proposed that certain types of learning are formed due to rewards and punishments following activities.

Social Observational Learning

As accurate as they are, classical and operant conditioning cannot capture the complete learning spectrum. The learning process that occurs when we learn behaviour from others is social observational learning. Observational learning was once thought to be solely about mimicking behaviour models. However, Albert Bandura, an American psychologist, proposed that behaviour is taught rather than imitated.

Module 9: Memory

Types of Memory

Short-term memory is the temporary storage of information in the brain for subsequent recall, such as recalling a phone number seen on T.V. Working memory is the temporary storage of information in the brain that allows it to be manipulated, such as recalling a series of numbers while calculating a mathematical equation. According to psychologists, working memory is the one that you have the most control over and can intentionally develop. Long-term memory is typically assumed to be permanent storage within the brain, a place where any knowledge is safely stored away. This is not the case.

Forgetting

Inattention or a failure of the brain to reinforce a memory long enough for it to be stored can lead to forgetful behaviour.

Methods for Improving Memory

Many individuals wish they had a better memory, but they do not believe it can manage. To some extent, this is correct. While some people are born with a natural ability to recall and retain knowledge, there are a few ways that can help you improve your memory.

  • Set time limits
  • Self-care
  • Relaxation
  • Working out
  • Self-testing
  • Abstain from multitasking
  • Distance yourself from distractions

Module 10: Attachment

Module 10 delves into the topic of attachment and how we form bonds with those around us. Simply said, attachment is a deep affectionate tie between two people in which each feels safe and secure. Adult connections are frequently developed as a result of ties made in infancy. We can gain a better grasp of human connection by diving into the concept of attachment.

Forming Attachments

Attachments form when a caregiver responds to a baby's cues predictably and accurately. The baby's caregiver must spend time with him or her, caring for them and interacting with them in a meaningful and predictable manner.

The Evolutionary Theory

The evolutionary theory of attachment, developed by British psychologist John Bowlby, explained how children's social, emotional, and cognitive development are influenced by their relationships with their carers. According to this view, babies' bonds to their caretakers are a biologically evolved survival mechanism. The infant's natural behaviours trigger adults' innate caregiving responses (e.g., crying and smiling).

The Learning Theory

According to this idea, all behaviour is taught by conditioning (whether classical or operant) to correlate a stimulus with a response (either a reward or a punishment). According to the attachment learning hypothesis, attachments are formed through classical or operant conditioning.

Age and Attachment

For the first 18 months of life, researchers Rudolph Schaffer and Peggy Emerson performed a study to evaluate attachment in children. They looked at how the kids interacted with their caretakers and how many attachment bonds they created.

  • Asocial stage (0 to 6 weeks)
  • Indiscriminate attachment (6 weeks to 7 months)
  • Specific attachment (7 to 9 months)
  • Multiple attachments (10 months and onwards)

Module 11: Trauma and Grieving

This course section explores trauma, grief, and therapy options for these issues. Trauma is a psychological or emotional response to a traumatic incident or scenario. When used lightly, this term can refer to anything catastrophic, such as getting involved in an accident, being sick or injured, losing a loved one, or going through a divorce. However, depending on the perspective of the individual physician, clinical criteria can be more limited.

Definition of Trauma

Trauma is defined as an occurrence that may or may not has involved harm, death, or violence. This narrower definition includes things like torture and sexual abuse. Some practitioners employ a looser definition, referring to the dictionary definition of trauma, including other traumatic occurrences such as losing a job.

The Brain and Trauma

After a traumatic event, adrenaline rushes through the body, and the memory is stored in the amygdala, which is part of the limbic system. The amygdala stores the emotional significance of an experience and the degree and intensity of emotion. The amygdala stores optical impressions of trauma as sensory fragments, indicating that the trauma experience is not maintained as a story but rather as how our human senses perceive the trauma at the time. Visual images, aromas, sounds, tastes, and touch are all employed to help people remember things.

The Grieving Process

Grief affects people in different ways. On the other hand, Physiologists split mourning into five stages after extensive investigation. These do not always happen in the same order or over the same amount of time. Grieving people may go quickly through some stages and linger in others.

Stage 1: Denial

Grief is a strong emotion that can be overwhelming at times. Unfortunately, powerful and frequently surprising sensations do not respond to losses or upheavals.

Stage 2: Anger

Although anger is a cloaking mechanism, denial can be considered a coping mechanism. The majority of a person's sentiments and suffering can be buried by rage. This fury could be directed at others, even the deceased person. The fury of a bereaved person might be focused on various objects.

Stage 3: Bargaining

When you are mourning, others may feel uneasy and powerless. While feeling strong emotions, people may wish to reclaim control or believe that they can affect the outcome.

Stage 4: Depression

In the early stages of mourning, people may seek to keep one step ahead of complicated emotions by avoiding their sensations. They may, however, be ready to recognize and process them more healthily at this point.

Stage 5: Acceptance

Acceptance is not necessarily a happy or optimistic part of the grieving process. This does not mean that the person has recovered from their grief or loss.

Complicated/Complex Grief

Even as time passes, some people cannot overcome their grief. Complicated grieving, often known as chronic complex bereavement disorder, is used to describe this type of sadness.

Module 12: Intelligence

We will talk about how psychologists define intelligence in this module. We will also look at several theories of intelligence and the many testing methods used to quantify it, and the debates around those methods.

Definition of Intelligence

The definition of intelligence is one of psychology's most contentious issues. When the term intelligence is used in everyday conversation, it usually refers to an inborn talent hardwired into one's brain from birth.

Theories of Intelligence

Psychologists have developed various opposing theories of intelligence due to differing definitions of intelligence. In psychology, there are four primary, widely acknowledged theories on intelligence.

Spearman's General Intelligence

Charles Spearman, a British psychologist, created the term "general intelligence" to describe an abstract idea he believed described human cognitive skills. He believes that a central aspect of universal intelligence is responsible for his success in two seemingly unrelated fields.

Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities Theory

  • Verbal comprehension
  • Word fluency
  • Number facility

Gardner's Multiple Intelligences

  • Linguistic
  • Logical-mathematical
  • Musical
  • Visual-Spatial

Triarchic Theory of Intelligence

Sternberg presented the triarchic theory of intelligence based on Gardner's thesis. The analytical, creative, and practical elements of intelligence focus on this paradigm.

Testing Methods and Controversy

Many testing systems utilized throughout various educational systems and anywhere required to measure intellect are based on four main testing approaches. As more study has been done on the possibility for bias or discriminatory testing procedures, people's views on testing have shifted. I.Q. Tests are commonly acknowledged as a means of assessing some qualities of intellect. These tests are incredibly trustworthy if an individual's scores stay consistent when repeated under similar conditions.

Binet–Simon Scale

The Binet-Simon Scale was one of the first I.Q. Psychology tests. It was created in 1905 by American psychologist Theodore Simon and French psychologist Alfred Binet.

Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scale

Later, Stanford University professor Lewis Terman published a fresh modification of Binet's original intelligence scale. On the other hand, Lewis proposed a much lengthier version with up to 400 components.

WISC and WAIS

American psychologist David Wechsler created these two intelligence scales to fill up Terman's intelligence scale gaps. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is a tool for assessing children's intelligence and thinking.

Types of Intelligence

A few other forms of intelligence have arisen in addition to Gardner's eight. As more corporations and schools evaluate many subsets of a person's I.Q., some terms, such as emotional intelligence, have become commonplace.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence is known as the ability to notice, appraise, and successfully control emotions. The higher a person's emotional intelligence, the better they can interpret other people's feelings and react appropriately.

Fluid Intelligence

Fluidity is defined as a person's capacity to think clearly, reason effectively, and solve problems without prior knowledge of the situation. These are good abilities that can be applied to a variety of situations.

Crystallized Intelligence

Someone who has acquired knowledge and experience is described as crystallized intellect. As a person gets older and learns more about life, intelligence develops. The difference between crystallized intelligence and an individual's I.Q. is that the latter is primarily static and does not grow or deteriorate with age. Consider how much you learnt from kindergarten through high school. Compare and contrast that with everything you have learned since then.

Module 13: Stress

The effects of stress on the body will be discussed in this unit. Although stress is commonly thought of as a negative, there are various varieties, each with advantages and disadvantages.

Stress Responses

A stimulus is an event or object that impacts one's behaviour. Stress is an emotional reaction to external or internal events in our surroundings. It can impact how a person feels and reacts to various situations. Every individual's definition of stress is different. What one person thinks stressful may not be the same as what another person finds stressful.

Evolutionary Purpose of Stress

Stress has evolved to convey warning signals to our body and brain to help us survive. We may feel compelled to freeze, flee, or fight when presented with overwhelming external stimuli. The fight-or-flight response is commonly referred to as this. These reactions result from an evolutionary pattern of behaviour that aids in our ability to adapt and survive.

Experiences and Observations

We can also learn how to respond in different situations based on our personal experiences and how others deal with stress. Adaptation is defined as a change in our usual behaviour. When confronted with harmful events, we may react differently to specific scenarios than to others. Even reacting with fight-or-flight responses to situations not always dangerous to us stems from this primary drive to survive.

Stress in Modern Context

Individually and collectively, stress might be advantageous. From an evolutionary standpoint, stress has aided our species' evolution and adaptation as a whole. This has persisted into modern times. We have been driven to evolve, develop, and expand as a collective. Stress is responsible for a lot of it. As a hunter-gatherer, are you tired of walking so much and taxing your body? Instead of starting a farm, perhaps you should plant some vegetables.

Common Stressors

Finances, health, employment, and family are all sources of stress for the average person. All of these stressors are interconnected and have an impact on one another. The ordinary person is responsible for oneself and their family members. They must consider their health as well as the health of others.

Mental Health

The relationship between the body and mind is key to understanding how stress can affect mental health and well-being. Psychological stress has an impact on our physical bodies and vice versa. Stress can cause our bodies to produce hormones and substances that are not always detrimental when they are only there for a short time but can be toxic if they are present for a long time. Individuals might become caught in a high state of arousal, making it difficult to turn off the fight-or-flight response.

Module 14: Careers in Psychology

We will talk about psychology careers and why so many people choose to work in this module. This will also provide a rundown of the most prevalent vocations' educational and training requirements.

Careers in Psychology

Whether in a hospital or an outpatient setting, such as counseling, health psychology, social work, or case management, a job in psychology can be gratifying. Psychiatry is a discipline of psychology that comprises fields such as in-patient hospital psychiatry and outpatient community psychiatry, which have direct patient contact.

Direct Patient Contact

Psychologists and other experts have direct interaction with patients in numerous professions. This type of care can come in various shapes and sizes, and it can take place in a variety of places.

  • In-patient care psychiatry
  • Outpatient community psychiatry
  • Child psychologist
  • Health psychologist
  • Clinical psychologist
  • Counselling psychologist

Research careers

Psychology is a dynamic profession that encompasses both clinical and research activities. Several psychology occupations deal with the research side of various organizations and industries.

Choosing to Enter the Field

Individuals have been researching the human mind for years to understand better how it works and how people act. Psychology is one of the most popular majors in the United States, with degrees in psychology leading to a wide range of professional prospects following graduation. Consider the following benefits of studying psychology to help you determine if this major is suited for you if you are considering majoring in psychology or just wondering whether it is worth taking some psychology classes.

Education and Training

Although there is no specific path to becoming a mental health practitioner, you must first earn your bachelor's degree before moving on to a master's or PhD program. A bachelor's or master's degree is required for some jobs.

 

Recognition & Accreditation

Upon successful completion of this course and achieving a passing score for the assessment, you will have a professional and deeper understanding about Psychology. You will also be issued with an international continuing education credit (CEU) certificate, accepted by many organizations worldwide. 

The Certificate is applicable worldwide, which demonstrates your commitment to learning new skills. You can share the certificate with your friends, relatives, co-workers, and potential employers. Also, include it in your resume/CV, professional social media profiles and job applications.

Module 1: Introduction to Psychology

  • Major Subsets of Psychology
  • Break from Philosophy
  • Structuralism
  • Functionalism
  • Psychoanalysis
  • Behaviourism
  • Humanistic Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology

Module 2: Developmental Psychology

  • Defining Developmental Psychology
  • Stages in Developmental Psychology
  • Prenatal
  • Early Childhood
  • Middle Childhood
  • Adolescence
  • Early Adulthood
  • Middle Adulthood
  • Older Adults
  • Key Figures and Theories
  • Focus Areas   

Module 3: Social Psychology

  • Scope of the Field
  • Benefits
  • Drawbacks
  • Major Theories 
  • Case Study: Bandura's Social Learning Theory
  • Case Study: Zimbardo Stanford Prison Experiment

Module 4: Human Emotion

  • What is an emotion?
  • Biological Foundations
  • How the Brain Processes Emotion
  • Interference
  • Mental Illness
  • Stress and Fatigue
  • Medication and Substances
  • Hormones
  • Neurodivergent Conditions

Module 5: Personality

  • Individual Personalities
  • Type Theories
  • Trait Theories
  • Psychodynamic Theories
  • Behavioural theories
  • Dimensions of Personality
  • Openness
  • Conscientiousness 
  • Extroversion
  • Agreeableness
  • Neuroticism
  • Personality Testing
  • Personality Changes

Module 6: Perception

  • Types of Perception
  • The Perceptual Process
  • Disorders Involving Perception
  • Schizophrenia
  • Aphantasia
  • Prosopagnosia
  • Spatial Neglect Syndrome

Module 7: Prejudice and Discrimination

  • Defining Prejudice and Discrimination
  • Forms of Discrimination
  • Psychological Basis

Module 8: Learning

  • Classical Conditioning
  • Operant Conditioning
  • Social Observational Learning

Module 9: Memory

  • Types of Memory
  • Forgetting
  • Methods for Improving Memory

Module 10: Attachment

  • Forming Attachments
  • The Evolutionary Theory
  • The Learning Theory
  • Age and Attachment

Module 11: Trauma and Grieving

  • Definition of Trauma
  • The Brain and Trauma
  • The Grieving Process
  • Stage 1: Denial
  • Stage 2: Anger
  • Stage 3: Bargaining
  • Stage 4: Depression
  • Stage 5: Acceptance
  • Complicated/Complex Grief

Module 12: Intelligence

  • Definition of Intelligence
  • Theories of Intelligence
  • Spearman's General Intelligence
  • Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities Theory
  • Gardner's Multiple Intelligences
  • Triarchic Theory of Intelligence
  • Testing Methods and Controversy
  • Binet–Simon Scale
  • Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scale
  • WISC and WAIS
  • Types of Intelligence
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Fluid Intelligence
  • Crystallized Intelligence

Module 13: Stress

  • Stress Responses
  • Evolutionary Purpose of Stress
  • Experiences and Observations
  • Stress in Modern Context
  • Common Stressors
  • Mental Health

Module 14: Careers in Psychology

  • Careers in Psychology
  • Direct Patient Contact
  • Research careers
  • Choosing to Enter the Field
  • Education and Training

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

1.  Who are Courses For Success?

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Online learning is easy, if not easier than a traditional academic situation. By studying an online course, the usual boundaries caused by location and time constraints are eliminated, meaning you are free to study where and when you want at your own pace. Of course, you will need to be able to self-manage your time and be organized, but with our help, you’ll soon find yourself settling into a comfortable rhythm of study.

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You don't need to be a computer expert to succeed with our online training, but you should be comfortable typing, using the internet and be capable of using common software (such as Microsoft word).

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There is no time limit for completing this course, it can be studied in your own time at your own pace. Once you have purchased this course you will have unlimited lifetime access, meaning you can access this course whenever you want.

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If you choose a course bundle, simply multiply the above hours by the number of courses included in the bundle.
For example:

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All the required material for your course is included in the online system, you do not need to buy anything else.

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About this Course

Study Psychology Online Courses and Gain Greater Knowledge of Feelings, Abilities and Personalities

Our Psychology Online Course will help you understand feelings, skills, and personalities better. Psychology is not just a discipline and a profession, but its principles may be applied to everyday life. Most students report that their employment, family, and social lives improved due to their studies. Psychology is a mental process. It is a science that requires researchers to ask specific questions about a topic before putting their theories to the test. It is challenging to define psychology. It is a broad phrase that refers to a wide range of topics in science and technology.

A group of scientists and philosophers from diverse backgrounds tried to explain the thoughts and behaviours of various living organisms, from the most rudimentary to the most sophisticated. Psychology is sometimes referred to as the "science of the mind" because of its philosophical and physiological foundations. Your initial response to this question will most likely be considerably different from the image of psychology that will develop as you progress through this course. You might be shocked to learn that psychology encompasses much more than just analyzing individuals and making a psychological diagnosis for emotional issues. It is also about how humans see colour, how stress impacts our biological processes, and why newborns cry when away from their caregivers.

What you will learn with our Psychology Online Course

  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Human Emotion
  • Personality
  • Perception
  • Prejudice and Discrimination
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Attachment
  • Trauma and Grieving
  • Intelligence
  • Stress
  • Careers in Psychology

Course Fast Facts:

  1. Learn the fundamentals of Psychology 
  2. Written and developed by leading Psychology experts
  3. Unlimited, lifetime access to online course
  4. Certificate of completion awarded with passing score for the online assessment
  5. Study at your own pace with no rigid class timetables, 24/7 from any computer or smart device

Psychology Online Course Outline

Module 1: Introduction to Psychology

This introductory subject will define psychology and look at how it's changed over time. The study of the mind and behaviour is known as psychology. It includes the mental processes, biological effects, and societal forces that impact people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviours. Psychologists and other mental health practitioners employ scientific knowledge to assist individuals in overcoming barriers and making better decisions in their daily lives.

Major Subsets of Psychology

Clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, behavioural psychology, and biopsychology are the four main branches of psychology.

Break from Philosophy

Psychology was once considered a branch of philosophy. This lasted until the nineteenth century, when German scientists Johannes P. Muller, Hermann von Helmholtz, and Gustav Fechner proved that mental processes could be explored scientifically.

Structuralism

Wundt was fascinated by breaking down the structure of the mind into smaller pieces and researching consciousness through experimental approaches such as introspection. The structuralism school of thinking was founded on this method.

Functionalism

William James, an American physician with a background in philosophy, rose to prominence as one of the country's leading psychologists in the mid-to late-nineteenth century. For the first time in the United States, James began teaching psychology as a separate course in 1875.

Psychoanalysis

Early psychology had focused on conscious human experience up to this point. This changed when Sigmund Freud, an Austrian neuropathologist, proposed a theory of human behaviour that stressed the unconscious mind's role. This idea was known as psychoanalysis, and it was both a method of mental disease treatment and a personality theory. Patients suffering from hysteria and other disorders piqued Freud's interest.

Behaviourism

John B. Watson, a functionalism-trained psychologist, revolutionized psychology in 1913 when he described behaviourism, a new approach to the profession. True psychology, according to Watson, is the study of observable and objective behaviour.

Humanistic Psychology

Psychoanalysis and behaviourism dominated psychology in the first half of the twentieth century. However, a new school of thinking known as humanistic psychology emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. In psychology, this school of thought is known as the "third force." This "third force" examines how people reach their full potential. Humanistic psychology was primarily established by psychologists Abraham Maslow and Carl Rodgers.

Cognitive Psychology

In the 1950s and 1960s, psychologists realized that they needed to look at internal mental processes to understand behaviour, which sparked a movement known as the cognitive revolution in psychology.

Module 2: Developmental Psychology

We will go through developmental psychology in great detail in this subject. Humans go through distinct stages of life at different times, and psychologists can examine the behaviours and challenges that arise during each of these stages to help people and better their lives. We will look at some significant figures in developmental psychology and describe the field. We will also look at some of the most common problems developmentalists can help with.

Defining Developmental Psychology

As previously said, humans are continually evolving, and it is a psychologist's role to learn about these changes and explain why they may occur. Even ordinary or expected changes can significantly impact a person's life as they get older. Psychologists can identify and act early in a child's development. Although some psychologists specialize in certain age groups, they can work with people of all ages in general.

Stages in Developmental Psychology

To better understand developmental psychology, it is necessary first to comprehend the many stages of life and how psychologists can assist people experiencing difficulties during these times.

Prenatal

Psychologists are particularly interested in the perinatal period, as they believe that many early reflexes are formed before birth. Similarly, various issues might occur during this time due to factors such as maternal medicines or genetic disorders.

Early Childhood

This is when there has been a lot of noticeable growth and change. Various types of growth, such as physical, cognitive, and emotional growth, are frequently studied by psychologists at this time.

Middle Childhood

Children begin to develop more distinct and well-rounded personalities throughout this time. They start to develop social skills, make friends, and grow.

Adolescence

For psychologists, this time is exciting because children begin to see themselves as active members of society and their environment. During this time, many people are forming their identities.

Early Adulthood

People build ties and connections during this time that often last a lifetime. As a result, connection, closeness, connectedness, and the formation of a family are common themes at this time.

Middle Adulthood

During this time, people frequently experience substantial life conflicts. They are more likely to think about and reflect on their life objectives and purpose during this stage.

Older Adults

During this time, most people have health concerns. Some people live well into their 80s and 90s, while others have difficulty. Apart from physical decline, dementia can be a problem for older people.

Key Figures and Theories

Over the years, three crucial figures in developmental psychology have been enormously influential: Jean Piaget (1896–1980), Lev Vygotsky (1896–1934), and John Bowlby (1907–1990). Each of these thinkers made a substantial contribution to the area. The work and conclusions of these people have impacted much contemporary research on this subject.

Focus Areas   

  • Guiding cognitive development during childhood and later stages of life
  • Overcoming developmental challenges and learning disabilities
  • Developing emotional intelligence
  • Aiding language acquisition

Module 3: Social Psychology

We will look into social psychology in this module—social psychology studies how society and social interactions influence human behaviour.

Scope of the Field

This field of study is founded on the concept that people react differently when alone and when they are in a group. When interacting with diverse groups, a person's mental process, capacity to define goals and ability to attain those goals may vary.

Benefits

  • Treating aggression and relationship issues
  • Improving cooperation, competition, and collective thinking in organizations
  • Informing workplace elements such as leadership, cohesion, and intolerance
  • Understanding the relationship between mental health and level of achievement

Drawbacks

  • Social behaviour is a complex mechanism controlled by several factors. Studies can reveal only the most minuscule fraction of these factors. As a result, studies in social psychology are often small to moderate compared to other fields.
  • So far, existing studies on this topic only have a generalized approach towards human behaviour, which underestimates individual differences.

Major Theories 

Social psychologists have developed various hypotheses by examining human interactions and behavior over lengthy periods.

  • Attribution theory
  • Attachment theory
  • Cognitive dissonance theory
  • Learning theory
  • Self-affirmation theory
  • Social identity theory
  • Social facilitation theory

Case Study: Bandura's Social Learning Theory

The teacher saw Ms A's hesitancy and lack of reaction in Language Arts class, so she wrote a case study about her. Ms A's behaviour was said to have lasted over a week. Ms A cannot pass this course because she finds literature challenging to comprehend.

Case Study: Zimbardo Stanford Prison Experiment

In 1973, Zimbardo and his collaborators devised this experiment. It was conducted on students who consented to participate in a fictitious prison scenario. The roles of detainees and guards were given to students at random. The inmates were kidnapped from their houses and transported to Stanford University's experimental prison, assigned identity numbers.

Module 4: Human Emotion

The spectrum of human emotion and the various ideas that characterize what emotions are will be discussed in Module 4. An overview of elements that can alter emotional processing will be included.

What is an emotion?

A mental state that mirrors specific physiological changes is an emotion. Subjective cognitive states that develop in reaction to inputs are also known as emotions. However, it is impossible to pin down a clear meaning of emotion. Experiences, assessments, and dispositions are all ways to think about emotions. We can take action, make judgments, avoid dangerous circumstances, and survive because of our emotions. They also aid in our mutual comprehension.

Biological Foundations

A ventral and dorsal neural system is thought to form affective states and emotional behaviour. The amygdala, anterior insula, ventral anterior cingulate cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex are all part of the ventral system. It is engaged in detecting emotional responses to stimuli in the environment, creating affective states, and automatically regulating emotional responses.

How the Brain Processes Emotion

The limbic system is a brain region that is heavily engaged in how we perceive emotion. The limbic system includes the amygdala, hypothalamus, and hippocampus, among other brain regions. To identify and process emotions, all of these structures operate together.

  • The sensory information about emotion-evoking events goes to the thalamus. 
  • It moves along the pathways from the thalamus to the amygdala and the cortex. 
  • The amygdala gets activated before the cortex and processes the information quickly.

Interference

Personal and environmental factors can affect how the brain perceives and processes emotional information. Individuals may find it challenging to control their emotions or cope with emotional stimulation due to these factors.

Mental Illness

Emotion experience, emotion management, and emotional expression are impaired in people with schizophrenia and mood disorders such as major depression.

Stress and Fatigue

Emotion regulation is weakened by mental exhaustion or the loss of cognitive resources. The amygdala is recognized for its heightened sensitivity to stressful situations. The secretion of amygdala neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA, noradrenaline, and serotonin increases during stressful times. Following stressful events, neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala act differently.

Medication and Substances

The functioning of several circuits in the brain can be altered by long-term drug usage. Prescription medicines are included in this. Dopamine receptors in the brain become less sensitive due to drugs that generate excessive dopamine release. This happens when the brain develops a natural resistance and the number of dopamine-transmitting cells decreases.

Hormones

Hormones are molecules secreted by endocrine glands that affect physical, physiological, and behavioural changes in the body, as you may recall. This can result in various conditions, some of which are emotional.

Neurodivergent Conditions

Emotional dysregulation is a feature of neurodivergent diseases, including ADHD and autism spectrum disorder. Differences in the amygdala, ventral striatum, and orbitofrontal cortex generate emotional problems.

Module 5: Personality

The idea of personality is the focus of this section of the course. Personality refers to a person's distinctive manner of thinking, feeling, and acting as defined by psychology. Every individual has a distinct personality. We all have unique characteristics and patterns that determine how we react to external and internal stimuli.

Individual Personalities

While there are numerous ideas around the concept of personality, it is widely accepted that a person's personality remains consistent throughout their lives and cannot be readily changed. While personality is a psychological construct, it is also influenced by biological processes and urges. Not only does our behaviour represent our personality, but so do our thoughts, feelings, relationships, and interactions with others.

Type Theories

According to type theories, personality is shaped mainly by biological elements, and there are several different personality types.

  • Type A
  • Type B
  • Type C
  • Type D

Trait Theories

Personality is viewed as a collection of genetically based internal qualities in trait theories.

  • Agreeable
  • Conscientious
  • Eager to please
  • Extraversion
  • Introversion
  • Neurotic

Psychodynamic Theories

Sigmund Freud's work inspired psychodynamic theories. They claim that the unconscious mind significantly impacts one's personality.

Behavioural theories

Environmental effects, according to behavioural theories, shape a person's personality. Behavioural theorists frequently overlook internal emotions and thoughts.

Dimensions of Personality

Many current psychologists feel that the big five personality traits are the essential building blocks of a person's personality. The five personality dimensions, according to researchers, are universal.

Openness

This personality attribute is characterized by creativity and understanding. People that are open to new experiences are more creative and eager to attempt new things. They enjoy taking on new problems and are content to ponder abstractly.

Conscientiousness 

This dimension is characterized by high attentiveness, attention to detail, and a penchant for a defined schedule. Conscientious people want to plan ahead of time, do critical activities swiftly, and consider how their actions affect others.

Extroversion

Extroversion is defined by sociability, aggressiveness, talkativeness, and emotional expressiveness. People with a high level of this attribute are outgoing, exuberant, and energetic in social situations.

Agreeableness

Altruism, trust, affection, and kindness are linked with this personality type. High agreeableness is associated with prosocial conduct, empathy, and concern for others. They are genuinely interested in people and like assisting them. They are usually cooperative and like contributing to the enjoyment of others.

Neuroticism

Sadness, moodiness, and irritation are all aspects of this dimension. Those with high levels of this attribute are emotionally unstable, with anxiety and a proclivity for getting agitated. They are easily stressed and tend to worry about minor matters.

Personality Testing

Personality testing employs various methods to assess the attribute patterns that people exhibit in various settings. Self-report inventories, in which the test-taker rates how well questions or statements related to them, and projective tests, in which the test-taker responds to an object or situation, are the two primary forms of personality testing.

Personality Changes

Psychologists are generally in agreement that personality does not change over time. Maturity, on the other hand, may bring about specific changes.

Module 6: Perception

We will cover perception and how it connects to psychology in Module 6. Perception is our sensory experience of the world. While our senses acquire data from our surroundings, perception describes how we experience, organize, and interpret that data. This not only allows us to interact with our surroundings, but it also helps us to survive in them.

Types of Perception

The five senses of sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch are part of perception. Proprioception, or our ability to notice changes in bodily movements and positions, is also included. Perception is also used in the cognitive process of digesting the information we receive, such as recognizing a relative's face or hearing a familiar tune.

The Perceptual Process

A person's perceptual process is a set of psychological stages used to choose, organize, and interpret stimuli. This happens all the time, despite most people being unaware of the natural mechanism involved in detecting stimuli.

Disorders Involving Perception

Cognitive problems can hamper the perceptual process. The ability to comprehend things or concepts is compromised in several perceptual diseases.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia alters the brain's functions, resulting in a distorted perspective of reality. This type of mental disorder is frequently a lifelong problem. On the other hand, the treatment allows people to manage their symptoms and live whole, active lives. Hallucinations, delusions, inability to express emotions, and abnormal thoughts and behaviours are common symptoms of schizophrenia.

Aphantasia

Aphantasia is the inability to visualize visuals in people. Aphantasia sufferers cannot imagine anything in their heads, unlike most people who can recall a scene or a face.

Prosopagnosia

Face blindness, or prosopagnosia, is a condition in which people cannot identify other people's faces. They are unable to recognize family and friends as a result of this.

Spatial Neglect Syndrome

After a brain injury, spatial neglect syndrome develops, resulting in an inability to attend to stimuli on one side of the body. They may, however, have no loss of sensation on the side that has been neglected.

Module 7: Prejudice and Discrimination

This unit explores the differences between prejudice and discrimination and their psychological underpinnings. You will also learn about the various sorts of prejudice and bias in the mental health field.

Defining Prejudice and Discrimination

Many people make the blunder of conflating the terms prejudice and discrimination. However, there is a significant contrast between the two notions in psychology.

Forms of Discrimination

Discrimination can manifest itself in a variety of ways. As previously stated, it can be motivated by a variety of factors, including gender (sexism, transphobia), race (racism), age (ageism), sexual identity (homophobia, biphobia), ethnicity (xenophobia), and many others. Discrimination can occur in various forms, including direct or indirect prejudice, as well as individual and institutional discrimination. While all types of prejudice are wrong, some are more subtle than others and have far-reaching ramifications.

Psychological Basis

According to both traditional and recent research, prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination are all caused by social interaction and communication. According to the research, they are more vital towards social groups more away from the subject demonstrating biased or discriminating conduct. While social scientists continue to research what causes people to have such attitudes, it is widely agreed that social norms play a significant role. Ralph D. Minard performed a study in West Virginia in 1952 on prejudice and discrimination among white and black coal miners.

Module 8: Learning

This session will look at how and why people learn. Psychology, being a mind-and-behaviour science, also looks into how people learn and remember things. When this topic is discussed, images of young children in schools immediately appear. While learning psychology as a branch has made significant contributions to modern teaching methods, it also includes adult learning as a continuous process.

Classical Conditioning

Simply described, classical conditioning is the process of learning through association. In the discipline, the renowned experiment done by Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov in the late 1800s has established a standard. In popular culture, "Pavlov's dog" has become synonymous with conditional learning. When dogs saw food, they salivated, which they later connected with lab employees entering their room, according to Pavlov. When they saw them, they started salivating as well.

Operant Conditioning

B.F. Skinner is a behaviourist from the United States. Skinner expanded on Pavlov's conditioning by pointing out that consequences (both positive and negative) influence which behaviours are taught. This is not to say that classical conditioning is incorrect; instead, it is another learning method. Operant conditioning, often known as Skinnerian conditioning after its originator, describes how associations between a particular behaviour and its consequences determine whether or not that behaviour is repeated in the future. Skinner proposed that certain types of learning are formed due to rewards and punishments following activities.

Social Observational Learning

As accurate as they are, classical and operant conditioning cannot capture the complete learning spectrum. The learning process that occurs when we learn behaviour from others is social observational learning. Observational learning was once thought to be solely about mimicking behaviour models. However, Albert Bandura, an American psychologist, proposed that behaviour is taught rather than imitated.

Module 9: Memory

Types of Memory

Short-term memory is the temporary storage of information in the brain for subsequent recall, such as recalling a phone number seen on T.V. Working memory is the temporary storage of information in the brain that allows it to be manipulated, such as recalling a series of numbers while calculating a mathematical equation. According to psychologists, working memory is the one that you have the most control over and can intentionally develop. Long-term memory is typically assumed to be permanent storage within the brain, a place where any knowledge is safely stored away. This is not the case.

Forgetting

Inattention or a failure of the brain to reinforce a memory long enough for it to be stored can lead to forgetful behaviour.

Methods for Improving Memory

Many individuals wish they had a better memory, but they do not believe it can manage. To some extent, this is correct. While some people are born with a natural ability to recall and retain knowledge, there are a few ways that can help you improve your memory.

  • Set time limits
  • Self-care
  • Relaxation
  • Working out
  • Self-testing
  • Abstain from multitasking
  • Distance yourself from distractions

Module 10: Attachment

Module 10 delves into the topic of attachment and how we form bonds with those around us. Simply said, attachment is a deep affectionate tie between two people in which each feels safe and secure. Adult connections are frequently developed as a result of ties made in infancy. We can gain a better grasp of human connection by diving into the concept of attachment.

Forming Attachments

Attachments form when a caregiver responds to a baby's cues predictably and accurately. The baby's caregiver must spend time with him or her, caring for them and interacting with them in a meaningful and predictable manner.

The Evolutionary Theory

The evolutionary theory of attachment, developed by British psychologist John Bowlby, explained how children's social, emotional, and cognitive development are influenced by their relationships with their carers. According to this view, babies' bonds to their caretakers are a biologically evolved survival mechanism. The infant's natural behaviours trigger adults' innate caregiving responses (e.g., crying and smiling).

The Learning Theory

According to this idea, all behaviour is taught by conditioning (whether classical or operant) to correlate a stimulus with a response (either a reward or a punishment). According to the attachment learning hypothesis, attachments are formed through classical or operant conditioning.

Age and Attachment

For the first 18 months of life, researchers Rudolph Schaffer and Peggy Emerson performed a study to evaluate attachment in children. They looked at how the kids interacted with their caretakers and how many attachment bonds they created.

  • Asocial stage (0 to 6 weeks)
  • Indiscriminate attachment (6 weeks to 7 months)
  • Specific attachment (7 to 9 months)
  • Multiple attachments (10 months and onwards)

Module 11: Trauma and Grieving

This course section explores trauma, grief, and therapy options for these issues. Trauma is a psychological or emotional response to a traumatic incident or scenario. When used lightly, this term can refer to anything catastrophic, such as getting involved in an accident, being sick or injured, losing a loved one, or going through a divorce. However, depending on the perspective of the individual physician, clinical criteria can be more limited.

Definition of Trauma

Trauma is defined as an occurrence that may or may not has involved harm, death, or violence. This narrower definition includes things like torture and sexual abuse. Some practitioners employ a looser definition, referring to the dictionary definition of trauma, including other traumatic occurrences such as losing a job.

The Brain and Trauma

After a traumatic event, adrenaline rushes through the body, and the memory is stored in the amygdala, which is part of the limbic system. The amygdala stores the emotional significance of an experience and the degree and intensity of emotion. The amygdala stores optical impressions of trauma as sensory fragments, indicating that the trauma experience is not maintained as a story but rather as how our human senses perceive the trauma at the time. Visual images, aromas, sounds, tastes, and touch are all employed to help people remember things.

The Grieving Process

Grief affects people in different ways. On the other hand, Physiologists split mourning into five stages after extensive investigation. These do not always happen in the same order or over the same amount of time. Grieving people may go quickly through some stages and linger in others.

Stage 1: Denial

Grief is a strong emotion that can be overwhelming at times. Unfortunately, powerful and frequently surprising sensations do not respond to losses or upheavals.

Stage 2: Anger

Although anger is a cloaking mechanism, denial can be considered a coping mechanism. The majority of a person's sentiments and suffering can be buried by rage. This fury could be directed at others, even the deceased person. The fury of a bereaved person might be focused on various objects.

Stage 3: Bargaining

When you are mourning, others may feel uneasy and powerless. While feeling strong emotions, people may wish to reclaim control or believe that they can affect the outcome.

Stage 4: Depression

In the early stages of mourning, people may seek to keep one step ahead of complicated emotions by avoiding their sensations. They may, however, be ready to recognize and process them more healthily at this point.

Stage 5: Acceptance

Acceptance is not necessarily a happy or optimistic part of the grieving process. This does not mean that the person has recovered from their grief or loss.

Complicated/Complex Grief

Even as time passes, some people cannot overcome their grief. Complicated grieving, often known as chronic complex bereavement disorder, is used to describe this type of sadness.

Module 12: Intelligence

We will talk about how psychologists define intelligence in this module. We will also look at several theories of intelligence and the many testing methods used to quantify it, and the debates around those methods.

Definition of Intelligence

The definition of intelligence is one of psychology's most contentious issues. When the term intelligence is used in everyday conversation, it usually refers to an inborn talent hardwired into one's brain from birth.

Theories of Intelligence

Psychologists have developed various opposing theories of intelligence due to differing definitions of intelligence. In psychology, there are four primary, widely acknowledged theories on intelligence.

Spearman's General Intelligence

Charles Spearman, a British psychologist, created the term "general intelligence" to describe an abstract idea he believed described human cognitive skills. He believes that a central aspect of universal intelligence is responsible for his success in two seemingly unrelated fields.

Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities Theory

  • Verbal comprehension
  • Word fluency
  • Number facility

Gardner's Multiple Intelligences

  • Linguistic
  • Logical-mathematical
  • Musical
  • Visual-Spatial

Triarchic Theory of Intelligence

Sternberg presented the triarchic theory of intelligence based on Gardner's thesis. The analytical, creative, and practical elements of intelligence focus on this paradigm.

Testing Methods and Controversy

Many testing systems utilized throughout various educational systems and anywhere required to measure intellect are based on four main testing approaches. As more study has been done on the possibility for bias or discriminatory testing procedures, people's views on testing have shifted. I.Q. Tests are commonly acknowledged as a means of assessing some qualities of intellect. These tests are incredibly trustworthy if an individual's scores stay consistent when repeated under similar conditions.

Binet–Simon Scale

The Binet-Simon Scale was one of the first I.Q. Psychology tests. It was created in 1905 by American psychologist Theodore Simon and French psychologist Alfred Binet.

Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scale

Later, Stanford University professor Lewis Terman published a fresh modification of Binet's original intelligence scale. On the other hand, Lewis proposed a much lengthier version with up to 400 components.

WISC and WAIS

American psychologist David Wechsler created these two intelligence scales to fill up Terman's intelligence scale gaps. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is a tool for assessing children's intelligence and thinking.

Types of Intelligence

A few other forms of intelligence have arisen in addition to Gardner's eight. As more corporations and schools evaluate many subsets of a person's I.Q., some terms, such as emotional intelligence, have become commonplace.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence is known as the ability to notice, appraise, and successfully control emotions. The higher a person's emotional intelligence, the better they can interpret other people's feelings and react appropriately.

Fluid Intelligence

Fluidity is defined as a person's capacity to think clearly, reason effectively, and solve problems without prior knowledge of the situation. These are good abilities that can be applied to a variety of situations.

Crystallized Intelligence

Someone who has acquired knowledge and experience is described as crystallized intellect. As a person gets older and learns more about life, intelligence develops. The difference between crystallized intelligence and an individual's I.Q. is that the latter is primarily static and does not grow or deteriorate with age. Consider how much you learnt from kindergarten through high school. Compare and contrast that with everything you have learned since then.

Module 13: Stress

The effects of stress on the body will be discussed in this unit. Although stress is commonly thought of as a negative, there are various varieties, each with advantages and disadvantages.

Stress Responses

A stimulus is an event or object that impacts one's behaviour. Stress is an emotional reaction to external or internal events in our surroundings. It can impact how a person feels and reacts to various situations. Every individual's definition of stress is different. What one person thinks stressful may not be the same as what another person finds stressful.

Evolutionary Purpose of Stress

Stress has evolved to convey warning signals to our body and brain to help us survive. We may feel compelled to freeze, flee, or fight when presented with overwhelming external stimuli. The fight-or-flight response is commonly referred to as this. These reactions result from an evolutionary pattern of behaviour that aids in our ability to adapt and survive.

Experiences and Observations

We can also learn how to respond in different situations based on our personal experiences and how others deal with stress. Adaptation is defined as a change in our usual behaviour. When confronted with harmful events, we may react differently to specific scenarios than to others. Even reacting with fight-or-flight responses to situations not always dangerous to us stems from this primary drive to survive.

Stress in Modern Context

Individually and collectively, stress might be advantageous. From an evolutionary standpoint, stress has aided our species' evolution and adaptation as a whole. This has persisted into modern times. We have been driven to evolve, develop, and expand as a collective. Stress is responsible for a lot of it. As a hunter-gatherer, are you tired of walking so much and taxing your body? Instead of starting a farm, perhaps you should plant some vegetables.

Common Stressors

Finances, health, employment, and family are all sources of stress for the average person. All of these stressors are interconnected and have an impact on one another. The ordinary person is responsible for oneself and their family members. They must consider their health as well as the health of others.

Mental Health

The relationship between the body and mind is key to understanding how stress can affect mental health and well-being. Psychological stress has an impact on our physical bodies and vice versa. Stress can cause our bodies to produce hormones and substances that are not always detrimental when they are only there for a short time but can be toxic if they are present for a long time. Individuals might become caught in a high state of arousal, making it difficult to turn off the fight-or-flight response.

Module 14: Careers in Psychology

We will talk about psychology careers and why so many people choose to work in this module. This will also provide a rundown of the most prevalent vocations' educational and training requirements.

Careers in Psychology

Whether in a hospital or an outpatient setting, such as counseling, health psychology, social work, or case management, a job in psychology can be gratifying. Psychiatry is a discipline of psychology that comprises fields such as in-patient hospital psychiatry and outpatient community psychiatry, which have direct patient contact.

Direct Patient Contact

Psychologists and other experts have direct interaction with patients in numerous professions. This type of care can come in various shapes and sizes, and it can take place in a variety of places.

  • In-patient care psychiatry
  • Outpatient community psychiatry
  • Child psychologist
  • Health psychologist
  • Clinical psychologist
  • Counselling psychologist

Research careers

Psychology is a dynamic profession that encompasses both clinical and research activities. Several psychology occupations deal with the research side of various organizations and industries.

Choosing to Enter the Field

Individuals have been researching the human mind for years to understand better how it works and how people act. Psychology is one of the most popular majors in the United States, with degrees in psychology leading to a wide range of professional prospects following graduation. Consider the following benefits of studying psychology to help you determine if this major is suited for you if you are considering majoring in psychology or just wondering whether it is worth taking some psychology classes.

Education and Training

Although there is no specific path to becoming a mental health practitioner, you must first earn your bachelor's degree before moving on to a master's or PhD program. A bachelor's or master's degree is required for some jobs.

 

Recognition & Accreditation

Upon successful completion of this course and achieving a passing score for the assessment, you will have a professional and deeper understanding about Psychology. You will also be issued with an international continuing education credit (CEU) certificate, accepted by many organizations worldwide. 

The Certificate is applicable worldwide, which demonstrates your commitment to learning new skills. You can share the certificate with your friends, relatives, co-workers, and potential employers. Also, include it in your resume/CV, professional social media profiles and job applications.

Module 1: Introduction to Psychology

  • Major Subsets of Psychology
  • Break from Philosophy
  • Structuralism
  • Functionalism
  • Psychoanalysis
  • Behaviourism
  • Humanistic Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology

Module 2: Developmental Psychology

  • Defining Developmental Psychology
  • Stages in Developmental Psychology
  • Prenatal
  • Early Childhood
  • Middle Childhood
  • Adolescence
  • Early Adulthood
  • Middle Adulthood
  • Older Adults
  • Key Figures and Theories
  • Focus Areas   

Module 3: Social Psychology

  • Scope of the Field
  • Benefits
  • Drawbacks
  • Major Theories 
  • Case Study: Bandura's Social Learning Theory
  • Case Study: Zimbardo Stanford Prison Experiment

Module 4: Human Emotion

  • What is an emotion?
  • Biological Foundations
  • How the Brain Processes Emotion
  • Interference
  • Mental Illness
  • Stress and Fatigue
  • Medication and Substances
  • Hormones
  • Neurodivergent Conditions

Module 5: Personality

  • Individual Personalities
  • Type Theories
  • Trait Theories
  • Psychodynamic Theories
  • Behavioural theories
  • Dimensions of Personality
  • Openness
  • Conscientiousness 
  • Extroversion
  • Agreeableness
  • Neuroticism
  • Personality Testing
  • Personality Changes

Module 6: Perception

  • Types of Perception
  • The Perceptual Process
  • Disorders Involving Perception
  • Schizophrenia
  • Aphantasia
  • Prosopagnosia
  • Spatial Neglect Syndrome

Module 7: Prejudice and Discrimination

  • Defining Prejudice and Discrimination
  • Forms of Discrimination
  • Psychological Basis

Module 8: Learning

  • Classical Conditioning
  • Operant Conditioning
  • Social Observational Learning

Module 9: Memory

  • Types of Memory
  • Forgetting
  • Methods for Improving Memory

Module 10: Attachment

  • Forming Attachments
  • The Evolutionary Theory
  • The Learning Theory
  • Age and Attachment

Module 11: Trauma and Grieving

  • Definition of Trauma
  • The Brain and Trauma
  • The Grieving Process
  • Stage 1: Denial
  • Stage 2: Anger
  • Stage 3: Bargaining
  • Stage 4: Depression
  • Stage 5: Acceptance
  • Complicated/Complex Grief

Module 12: Intelligence

  • Definition of Intelligence
  • Theories of Intelligence
  • Spearman's General Intelligence
  • Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities Theory
  • Gardner's Multiple Intelligences
  • Triarchic Theory of Intelligence
  • Testing Methods and Controversy
  • Binet–Simon Scale
  • Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scale
  • WISC and WAIS
  • Types of Intelligence
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Fluid Intelligence
  • Crystallized Intelligence

Module 13: Stress

  • Stress Responses
  • Evolutionary Purpose of Stress
  • Experiences and Observations
  • Stress in Modern Context
  • Common Stressors
  • Mental Health

Module 14: Careers in Psychology

  • Careers in Psychology
  • Direct Patient Contact
  • Research careers
  • Choosing to Enter the Field
  • Education and Training

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

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Course Summary

Course ID: CFS01PSY
Delivery Mode: Online
Access: Unlimited lifetime
Tutor Support: Yes
Time: Study at your own pace
Duration: 20 Hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

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