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About This Course

Enjoy these Benefits and Get a Better Understanding of Criminal Science!

  • Get an introduction to the discipline of criminology and how it has evolved over time
  • Learn the different approaches to criminology, theories, and different schools of thinking
  • A look into the social theories of crime and the collective behaviors of people who commit crimes
  • The course will discuss the fundamentals of criminal psychology, terminologies, and limitations
  • It will teach you the fundamentals of criminal psychology and psychological profiling
  • Learn the different roles of a criminologist including everyday tasks and duties

Study Criminology for Beginners Online Course and Learn the Types of Criminals, Processing a Scene of Crime, Profiling Methods

Our beginner criminology course is for those who want to learn about criminology for enjoyment or as a taster towards further study and accreditation. It is designed in simple language to help students grasp the fundamentals of forensics, autopsies, types of criminals, processing a crime scene, profiling tactics, and will look at prior cases and policing strategies, as well as criminal justice.

Primarily concentrating on murder cases the student will be able to gather an understanding of how autopsies provide information and clues not just to cause of death but also the life style of the victim and the possible identity of the perpetrator of the crime. For more information about this course and similar courses, you can visit our Criminology Online Courses.

To successfully complete this course, a student must:
  • Have access to the internet and the necessary technical skills to navigate the online learning resources

  • Have access to any mobile device with internet connectivity (laptop, desktop, tablet)

  • Be a self-directed learner

  • Possess sound language and literacy skills

Quick Course Facts
  1. Beginner criminology course content is structured for easy comprehension

  2. Registered students gain unrestricted access to the Criminology for Beginners Online Course

  3. All course material is available online 24/7 and can be accessed using any device

  4. Study online from anywhere in your own time at your own pace

  5. All students who complete the course will be awarded with a certificate of completion

Criminology for Beginners Online Course Outline

Module 1: Introduction

This is the first module in the beginner criminology course. This course section will introduce the discipline of criminology and its evolution over time. We will also discuss how technology improvements have influenced how criminal investigators think about and evaluate crime.

Criminology and Criminal Justice

While the terms criminology and criminal justice may appear interchangeable, there is a substantial distinction between the two. The former relates to the objective study of crime, focusing on the field's scientific and scholarly components. The latter looks at how society responds to crime, including police, criminal courts, correctional institutions, and juvenile justice systems.

History and Evolution of Criminology

The beginnings of criminology may be traced back to initiatives attempted to alter the criminal justice and prison systems as early as 200 years ago. Cesare Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham were two of the most influential authors whose work established the classical school of criminology. According to this school of thinking, torture of the accused for confessions, testimony, and punishment should be prohibited. People should be penalized for acting on their own free choice and fully conscious of their acts. The penalties must be severe enough to compensate for the illicit benefit.

The Importance of Studying Crime

Crime is unavoidable, and it grows as society becomes more complicated. Political, cultural, socioeconomic, and technical developments all impact crime; thus, it's critical to reform policing when the need arises to stay current.

Case Study: Community-Based Policing

When Chief George K. Hansen announced the concept to the public in 1975, the Lincoln Police Department embraced community-based policing. Although comparable attempts to replace existing tactics with "neighbourhood-based team policing" have been made in Los Angeles, Cincinnati, and other cities, the Los Angeles Police Department has proved to be the movement's pioneer. Employee solutions and dozens of general ideas have been integrated. They also recognized their strengths and shortcomings over time, which helped them allocate resources to needed development.

The Role of Technology

The advancement of technology and the ongoing emergence of new inventions in the area have improved police and law enforcement. It has also aided in crime prevention to some level, as new technologies to increase personal safety and security are developed. There are two types of innovations to consider: hard and soft. Complex technology refers to physical materials and equipment that serve many segments of society while also assisting in crime prevention.

Module 2: Theoretical Approaches

We'll go over the fundamentals of numerous theoretical approaches to criminology in this lesson, characterized as attempts to explain and comprehend what drives people to commit crimes. This will contain a brief history of criminology theory and an overview of the three primary schools of thinking. Finally, we'll look into biological theories of crime to better grasp how theoretical approaches evolve as science advances. We'll also talk about the possibility of prejudice and how it affects criminology research.

Schools of Thought

Modern criminology studies address crime from a biological, psychological, or social standpoint. These three diverse approaches have impacted theoretical attempts to comprehend criminal motivations.

Brief History of Criminology Theory

Understanding these theoretical perspectives in a historical context is critical for anybody interested in studying criminology. Biological theories of crime, which claimed that criminality was hereditary within families, were popular until the nineteenth century. This theoretical approach strongly influenced early criminology research, and quick results were formed. Finally, criminologists started looking into individual and social theories of crime and analyzing crime statistics.

Biological Theories of Crime: A Case Study

Before the emergence of neuroscience and contemporary psychology, biological theories of crime generally argued that people were "born criminals," unable to control themselves owing to handicap or inherent differences. They couldn't be stopped from committing crimes because of this. Some even claimed that crime could be inherited, like hair colour or nose form.

Bias and Discrimination

Unfortunately, some of the genetic, psychological, and physiological elements that criminologists still study is founded on a history of prejudice and bias. This includes commonly used markers such as IQ level, traditionally used to assess white people. Both the Classical and Positivist Schools proposed that specific physical characteristics or measures indicate a crime. This included face traits and head size, both of which have long been disproved and demonstrated to be factored in the spread of racial prejudice.

Module 3: Sociological Theories

The third module will look at social theories of crime. Because it examines the individual and collective behaviours of adults and adolescents who commit crimes, sociology is inextricably tied to the study of crime. It also considers the changing nature of laws and social norms as the globe changes. This includes emphasizing how government agencies such as social welfare, police, child protection, courts, and penal institutions control and prevent such criminal actions.

Laws as Social Norms

Laws are passed to govern conduct to conform to societal norms. They are critical in guaranteeing that in places where people' self-interest and societal standards clash, they turn to undesirable conduct and illegal activities. Deviant conduct refers to individuals who violate social norms and commonly accepted conventions. In contrast, criminal behaviour refers to those who violate social laws. This idea is subjective and multifaceted because it varies according to persons, locations, and time.

Structural Functionalism

According to this hypothesis, deviant conduct influences the formation of society by bringing together disparate segments of the people within a given civilization. This is because deviant conduct contributes to establishing acceptable and undesirable activities' bounds and restrictions. Social values and standards are then solidified as a result of these limits. Although lousy behaviour can disrupt societal balance and harmony, it is helpful in the long term since it aids in the restoration of equilibrium.

Social Strain Typology

According to this approach, aberrant conduct may be identified using typology. Personality variables are all variables in typology: people's belief systems, motivating factors, adherence to cultural ideals, and the methods to reach these goals.

Conflict Theory

According to this hypothesis, aberrant conduct exists due to societal injustice and social disparities. Gender, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, and socioeconomic position are all factors that can be used to separate them.

Labelling Theory

According to this notion, people's perceptions of what constitutes deviant conduct are shaped by society's labels, symbols, and behaviours. Only when society brands something as aberrant is it regarded deviant. This theory is about who allocates labels, why they are assigned, and their consequences. Politicians, police officers, physicians, legislators, and judges, for example, are often the ones who establish such designations.

Classes of Crimes in Sociology

  • Violent crime

  • Property crime

  • White-collar crime

  • Organized crime

  • Consensual/victimless crime

Module 4: Psychological Theories of Criminology

The fundamentals of criminal psychology will be covered in this session. First, we'll define a few key terminologies and discuss the field's breadth. Three major criminological psychology theories will be discussed, followed by the present legal method for evaluating mental competence in criminal cases.

Definitions

Criminal psychology is the study of known or suspected criminals' thoughts and behaviours, with the goal of better understanding their motivations. Investigators frequently consult with a criminal psychologist. They are in charge of developing a psychological profile of an unknown criminal suspect to aid law enforcement in conducting interviews, gathering evidence, and conducting searches.

Psychological Theories of Criminology

Based on centuries of study, criminal psychologists have come to an agreement on three theoretical approaches to explaining why individuals commit crimes.

Psychodynamic Theory

This method considers a person's early years and how they may have influenced their criminal tendencies. It is primarily based on the ideas of Sigmund Freud, who claimed that everyone had three core components.

Behavioural Theory

To understand the criminal potential, this theory focuses on individuals' behaviours and the feedback they get from the environment around them. The idea focuses on an individual's reactions to their activities, conditioned by rewarding "good" conduct and punishing "poor" behaviour.

Cognitive Theory

This theory is concerned with a person's view of the universe and how such perceptions might manifest as ideas, acts, or behaviours.

Mental Competence

As previously stated, criminal insanity can be utilized to defend an accused person in criminal prosecution. An insanity defence essentially claims that the defendant lacked sufficient mens rea to be held legally culpable. Mens rea is a legal term that describes one's intention or knowledge of wrongdoing regarding their actions, and an insanity defence essentially claims that the defendant lacked sufficient mens rea to be held legally culpable. There is, however, a crucial distinction to be made between mental incompetence and criminal insanity. In the legal system, mental competency refers to a defendant's ability to make informed judgments about their trial, cooperate adequately with their counsel in preparing their defence, and make informed decisions about whether or not to plead guilty or accept any plea deals.

Module 5: Crime Scenes and Autopsies

We'll look at a typical day in the life of a criminologist in this session, covering their everyday tasks and duties. We'll also talk about what the work includes in various situations, such as investigating crime scenes and attending autopsies.

Day-to-Day Responsibilities

Criminology is a multidisciplinary study encompassing psychology, sociology, law, and other disciplines. As a result, criminologists can operate in various settings where their skills are needed. A criminologist can work as a crime scene investigator, gathering forensic evidence and preparing legal cases, or as a criminal investigator, with extra responsibilities such as collecting evidence and compiling legal cases.

Role of a Criminologist

It might be difficult for laypeople to tell who performs what in an investigation because many professions are engaged. Forensic criminologists, for example, help scientists connect existing forensic data to psychological and behavioural indications.

Forensic Criminology

A death investigation may involve a large number of persons from many professions. At times, forensic criminologists are present at both the death scene and the autopsy. While a forensic medical specialist performs the autopsy, a criminologist may be present to learn more about the nature of the victim's death, assess the body damage, and so on.

Module 6: Sex Work and Prostitution

The role of criminologists in studying sex work is discussed in this section. The legality of sex work in the United States and the controversies surrounding its legalization will be discussed. You'll also understand the differences between the so-called Nordic model and full legalization of sex labour, as well as the justifications that proponents of each method used in their disputes. Finally, we'll look at Maslow's hierarchy of requirements, going over each level and figuring out where sex fits in.

Studying Sex Work

Prostitution is defined as the act of providing sex in return for money. Although it is most commonly associated with financial gain, it may be used to any sort of benefit. The phrase sex labour has been used to escape the negative connotations connected with the original word. This is also meant to underline that sex work is much like any other kind of work. Sex labour has existed since the dawn of time. It's even been called "the oldest profession" because it was formerly considered an aberrant practice, and sex workers were thought to be disease-ridden criminals.

Legality in the United States

Sex work is illegal in the great majority of the United States, despite its prevalence. It is prohibited under state law rather than federal legislation. It is, however, permissible in a few rural Nevada counties, which is a rare exception.

International Legality

The so-called Nordic model, initially adopted in Sweden, is the most prevalent model used in discussions about regulating sex work. Buying sex is prohibited under the Nordic model, but the sex worker is not prosecuted for offering it. By preventing consumers from participating in commercial sex, it hopes to phase out sex employment gradually. There has been much debate among those working on the issue regarding whether the Nordic model or complete decriminalization is the better strategy.

Arguments in Favor of Legalization

Many Americans feel that government should not prohibit voluntary, consenting sex between adults. The criminalization of sex, in their opinion, breaches the human right to privacy, which is a cornerstone of modern constitutions and international human rights institutions. Human rights organizations have long argued that criminalizing sex workers puts them vulnerable to various crimes, including harassment, rape, and even murder. If they are afraid of being jailed, they will be less inclined to disclose attacks.

Arguments Against Legalization

Many individuals, including some former sex workers, regard the trade as unethical and exploitative, contributing to women's subjugation. In recent years, several attempts by public authorities to campaign for legalization in New York have failed because of a lack of widespread support.

Evolution of Sex Work

As technology advancements transform the way sex is commodified, the subject of whether to legalize sex work continues to be debated in modern cultures. The activities that come under sex work have not all been similarly controlled, from strip clubs to online porn. Prostitution, or having sex for money, has long been seen as something distinct from consuming sex as a kind of entertainment or from afar. However, there are still some ambiguities.

Sex as a Need

Maslow's hierarchy is the most well-known model of human needs. It was created in 1943 by American psychologist Abraham Maslow and contained five phases. The theory is sometimes shown as a pyramid, with the most fundamental requirements at the bottom and learned emotions at the top to emphasize Maslow's views better. According to Maslow's hierarchy of requirements, a person's lower needs must be addressed first before achieving stronger desires.

Module 7: Violent Crime

The topic of violent crime will be the subject of Module 7. Physical activity was undertaken to cause physical or psychological injury or damage is commonly characterized as violence. Although social scientists have yet to develop a single definition, this is the most commonly used term. These offences are perceived differently under the law and psychologically because of the potential for harm.

Defining Violence

The bulk of criminologists uses physical harm or threats as their definitions of violence. It's crucial to understand the definition of violence a criminologist uses, as this might have a significant impact on many things. It will impact not just what constitutes a crime, but also the ideas that might be employed to explain it. As a result, the criminologist's perception of the crime's underlying societal consequences may be influenced.

Serial Killers

Serial killing is defined as the homicide of two or more persons at different times by one or more people. Serial murder is distinguished because it is frequently performed against strangers. The great majority of killings, on the other hand, take place between persons who had known each other before. Serial killing should not be confused with mass murder, which occurs when several victims are killed simultaneously and in the exact location. The study of serial killers and their acts has lacked historical and cultural context for a long time. Most of the study on the phenomena focuses on well-known people and try to understand their behaviour patterns through customized psychological analysis.

Violent Crime and Anonymity

In the last 200 years, mass urbanization and the advent of capitalism have resulted in an increasing number of contacts with strangers. In medieval times, it was uncommon for individuals to encounter strangers since they were restricted to their tiny territory. This is no longer the case in current society due to the growth of denser settlements.

Popular Culture

Despite being rare in real-life serial murdering and murder have received much attention in popular culture. Information on violent crime may be found in every corner of modern pop culture transmitted through mass media, from documentaries and Hollywood blockbusters to novels and, most recently, actual crime podcasts. Serial killer imagery in modern culture and the idolization of high-profile murders paved the way for people consumed by the desire to become famous for doing so by committing a violent crime. There is an element of renown involved with violence, whether shooting up a gathering area or striking a specific target.

Dehumanization

Random violent crime victims are typically those who have been marginalized by society in some way. Homeless individuals, drug addicts, sex workers, migrant labourers, and other vulnerable community members, such as children and the elderly, are among their victims. For example, an older adult is less likely to be physically competent in fending off a violent attack for their personal belongings. Serial killers' selection attitude is a repetition of hegemonic cultural standards that dehumanize particular population segments.

"Angel of Death" Killers

Murders that aren't necessarily violent in the classic sense are also possible. There isn't a direct attack that involves blood or a battle. Because they terminate the lives of those in their care, certain serial murderers, particularly those in the healthcare field, are termed "angels of death." As they are often known, medical killers frequently get away with many more killings than ordinary people. This is because they prey on people in hospitals or hospices, where death is common, and their actions might be difficult to identify. Their motivations can also differ significantly.

Brain Abnormalities in Violent Criminals

Scientists have long strived to comprehend criminal brains and what motivates them to commit acts of violence and murder. It has now been possible to analyze offenders' brains thanks to sophisticated brain imaging technology. According to new research, adult males who have committed murder have brains that differ significantly from other criminals. A total of 808 inmates were included in the study. The experiment's researchers removed any offenders who had psychosis or brain damage that may have affected their decision to commit the crime.

 

Module 8: Kidnapping

This section of the course will cover kidnapping and what it entails in these complicated circumstances.

Defining Kidnapping

A person is kidnapped when they are abducted against their will and unlawfully seized and confined to an area held hostage. They are unable to depart at this period and are held captive.

Motives

Every 40 seconds, a kidnapping occurs in the United States. Every year, roughly 840,000 children are reported missing in the United States. The reasons for abduction differ based on the kidnapper and the crime committed. Though a case isn't restricted to just one, the motive may be loosely divided into four categories.

Degrees of Kidnapping

  • First-degree kidnapping

  • Second-degree kidnapping

  • Parental kidnapping

Investigations

When an abduction is reported, several organizations help with the investigation. The first groups are local law enforcement, local investigators, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. These agencies may also establish hotlines or online tip portals to collect information from the public and investigate. They may also issue a Code Adam or an AMBER Alert. AMBER Alert is an emergency broadcast system created in memory of Amber Hagerman. AMBER stands for America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response. Amber was kidnapped and killed in Texas when she was nine years old.

Emerging Patterns

As preventive measures such as national tools, social media, and improved phone and picture technologies have grown more common, kidnapping occurrences have dropped. On the other hand, the act of abduction has evolved as a result of this progression. Virtual kidnapping is progressively emerging as a new and prominent kind of kidnapping. Virtual kidnapping is a type of kidnapping that takes place via technology. Instead of putting themselves in danger physically, criminals will create a false sensation of danger.

Kidnapping and Forensics

Because kidnapping frequently includes children, forensic science has improved investigative capabilities using cutting-edge technologies. As time passes, photos that were formerly used as a beginning point to show a community a missing person rapidly become outdated. Because face characteristics fluctuate and mature with age, skilled forensic artists can imitate age progression as the victim ages. Such technology has proven to be an effective tool for keeping photos current.

Personal Safety

As this crime has been more known through time, so have the means for protecting one's protection. Forums and social media educate the public about national scams, what to look out for, and how to prevent becoming a victim of an abduction. Technology such as mobile phone GPS tracking, GPS tagging, and location sharing have all impacted this. As a result, it's simpler for regular people to let others know where they're going, especially if they're going somewhere new or using a ridesharing service.

Module 9: Somnambulism

The strange phenomena of somnambulism are dissected in Module 9. Somnambulism, often known as sleepwalking, is a sleep condition where people execute various motor motions while sleeping. Going to the bathroom, eating, strolling around, standing, leaving the house, dressing, chatting, or yelling are all examples of this. We'll talk about sleepwalking as a defence for committing a crime, as well as the most likely reasons.

Sleepwalking in Historical Context

Sleepwalking has been used as a defence for killings and other serious crimes. There have been documented incidents of murder and attempted murder suspects being acquitted after sleepwalking played a crucial part in their defence. An Ontario court acquired a Canadian man accused of murdering his mother-in-law and attempted to murder his father-in-law in 1987. The accused pled not guilty and employed sleepwalking as a defence to prove his innocence.

Causes

Some distinct variables can influence whether or whether a person suffers sleepwalking.

Violent Sleepwalking

Sleepwalkers have been known to be violent in the past. Some sleepwalkers have been charged with homicide, while others have been accused of injuring individuals they encounter while sleeping. Sleepwalking violence is uncommon because most sleepwalking behaviors entail getting out of bed, sitting up, and completing modest tasks. On the other hand, sleepwalking violence might happen early in the sleep cycle. Sleepwalking happens when you're in the slow-wave period of sleep. Following this, the person enters the rapid eye movement cycle (REM cycle), which causes the areas of the brain that govern morality and other voluntary activities to become paralyzed.

Case Study: Kenneth Parks

Kenneth Parks, who was accused of killing his mother-in-law, Mrs Barbara Woods, is one of the most well-known incidents of sleepwalking homicide. He was also accused of attempting to murder his father-in-law, Mr Denis Woods. At 24 years old, Kenneth Parks drove from Pickering to Scarborough, Ontario, on May 24, 1987. When he arrived at his in-laws' house, he used the extra key he had to enter the door and bludgeoned his mother-in-law with a tire iron. Kenneth also attempted but failed to choke his father-in-law to death. He got into his car, covered in blood, and went to a neighbouring police station to report the crime he had just committed.

Module 10: Capital Punishment

Module 10 delves into the concept of capital punishment for offences of a specific degree. We'll also go through the history of death punishment in the United States and look at the various execution procedures. You'll also learn about the ethical problems and debate this procedure has sparked. Finally, we'll go through when capital punishment is authorized and which federal crimes are punishable by death.

History

Capital punishment refers to the death sentence, with capital approximately meaning "head." Beheading was a standard method of execution in the past, although it was never employed in the United States. Lethal injection, poison gas exposure, electrocution, hanging, and gunshot have all been used to carry out the death penalty over the years. Around 1630, the first executions were carried out in America. In England at the time, minor offences like stealing a loaf of bread or pickpocketing were punishable by death. The number of capital offences in America was considerable at one time. Still, they were steadily decreased until only first-degree murder remained.

Methods of Execution

Historically, electrocution, hanging, fatal injection, firing squad, or gas chamber executions were the most common methods of death in the United States. Several execution procedures have been judged unlawful by various state laws.

Lethal Injection

Oklahoma was the first state to employ lethal injection as a method of execution in 1977. Charles Brooks was the first person to be executed this way in 1982. While tied to a gurney, many cardiac monitors are placed on the prisoner's skin.

Electrocution

The first electric chair was created in New York in 1888, and it was used to execute William Kemmler in 1890. The convict is strapped to an electric chair. During the electrocution process, a metal skullcap electrode is attached to the prisoner's shaved head's forehead and scalp.

Gas Chamber

In 1924, cyanide gas was first used on Gee Jon in Nevada. The convict is fastened to a chair and placed into a gas chamber. Crystals of sodium cyanide are discharged into the chamber. A chemical process produces hydrogen cyanide gas, depriving the prisoner of oxygen to the brain.

Firing Squad

A firing squad executed Ronnie Gardner in Utah in 2010. A hood is placed over the inmate's head, chained to a chair. There are generally several shooters, yet each weapon usually only has one bullet.

Hanging

Until the 1890s, most authorized executions in the United States were carried out by hanging. The detainee is shackled and has a rope over their neck.

Module 11: Research

In this session, we'll talk about the latest research in criminology. Journals or reports from individual studies may publish research. Analyzing research topics is fascinating since it reveals the most critical areas for further exploration in a specific field. It also reveals the field's priorities at any given time.

How our beginner criminology course can benefit you?

Our criminal justice course will help you understand justice systems, theories of crime, fraud examination, crime scenes, and the psychology of criminal justice.

Our online criminology courses come with full lifetime access along with career guides who will help you determine which branch of criminal law you want to pursue. Learning criminology from our online course will help advance your career more than some degree programs.

Studying criminology branches like forensic criminology, or critical criminology will also help you understand how homeland security works.

The online criminal justice course is one of our most popular courses and will surely help in your career development. The criminal justice system needs more talented people like you and we are here to help you become an expert in criminal investigation. 

Research & Accreditation

Upon successful completion of this course and achieving a passing score for the assessment, you will be issued with an international continuing education credit (CEU) certificate.

This Certificate is applicable worldwide, which demonstrates your commitment to learning new skills. You can share the certificate with your friends, relatives, co-workers, and potential employers. Also, include it in your resume/CV, professional social media profiles and job applications.

Get Your Online Certificate for Beginner Criminology Course Here

If you’re a true crime lover interested in citizen security as well as personal development, our beginner criminology course is just for you. There are plenty of careers in criminology and our online training can help you get them.

Our beginner criminology course is much more in-depth program than edx courses. A certificate course in international criminal justice can also go a long way in becoming a top public administrator. 



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Units of Study

 

Module 1: Introduction

  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • History and Evolution of Criminology
  • The Importance of Studying Crime
  • Case Study: Community-Based Policing
  • The Role of Technology

Module 2: Theoretical Approaches

  • Schools of Thought
  • Brief History of Criminology Theory
  • Biological Theories of Crime: A Case Study
  • Bias and Discrimination

Module 3: Sociological Theories

  • Laws as Social Norms
  • Structural Functionalism
  • Social Strain Typology
  • Conflict Theory
  • Labelling Theory
  • Classes of Crimes in Sociology

Module 4: Psychological Theories of Criminology

  • Definitions
  • Psychological Theories of Criminology
  • Psychodynamic Theory
  • Behavioural Theory
  • Cognitive Theory
  • Mental Competence

Module 5: Crime Scenes and Autopsies

  • Day-to-Day Responsibilities
  • Role of a Criminologist
  • Forensic Criminology

Module 6: Sex Work and Prostitution

  • Studying Sex Work
  • Legality in the United States
  • International Legality
  • Arguments in Favor of Legalization
  • Arguments Against Legalization
  • Evolution of Sex Work
  • Sex as a Need

Module 7: Violent Crime

  • Defining Violence
  • Serial Killers
  • Violent Crime and Anonymity
  • Popular Culture
  • Dehumanization
  • "Angel of Death" Killers
  • Brain Abnormalities in Violent Criminals

Module 8: Kidnapping

  • Defining Kidnapping
  • Motives
  • Degrees of Kidnapping
  • Investigations
  • Emerging Patterns
  • Kidnapping and Forensics
  • Personal Safety

Module 9: Somnambulism

  • Sleepwalking in Historical Context
  • Causes
  • Violent Sleepwalking
  • Case Study: Kenneth Parks

Module 10: Capital Punishment

  • History
  • Methods of Execution
  • Lethal Injection
  • Electrocution
  • Gas Chamber
  • Firing Squad
  • Hanging
  • Legality by Geography
  • Controversy
  • Federal Capital Crimes

Module 11: Research

  • Crime Reporting
  • Internet Journal of Criminology
  • Critical Criminology
  • National Criminal Intelligence Resource Center
  • Surveys and Programs
  • Areas For Further Study

Module 12: Careers

  • Careers in Criminology
  • Criminology Majors
  • Education Required
Requirements

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet.

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

Microsoft Windows XP, or laterModern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

OSX/iOS 6 or laterModern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or fasterFlash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Requirements

Entry requirements:

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.


Minimum education:

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.


Device requirements:

Students will need access to a computer/any device and the internet.

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but you should be comfortable typing, using the internet and be capable
of using common software (such as Microsoft word).

12.  How long will you have access to the online course?

The majority of our courses have unlimited lifetime access, meaning you can access this course whenever you want.

Please also check the course summary, as a small selection of courses have limited access.

13.  How long will my course take?

Course duration, is listed under Course Summary

14.  Do I need to buy textbooks?

All the required material for your course is included in the online system, you do not need to buy anything else.

15.  Is the course interactive?

Yes, all our courses are interactive.

16.  Is there an assessment or exam?

Yes,
you will be required to complete a multiple-choice test online at the
end of your course, you can do this test as many times as you require.

17.  What type of certificate will I receive?

You
will receive a Certificate of Completion that is applicable worldwide,
which demonstrates your commitment to learning new skills. You can share
the certificate with your friends, relatives, co-workers and employers.
Also, include it in your resume/CV, professional social media profiles
and job applications.

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The term “Courses for Success” helped me in my current position to succeed. After completing the courses, I gave my manager the completion certificates. Recently I received a promotion too."

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had a very good experience with my course. It has helped me to get
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Our
completion certificates are very valuable and will help you progress in
your work environment and show employers how committed you are to learn
new skills, you might even get a promotion.

18.  Will this course be credited by universities?

No, it is not equivalent to a college or university credit.

19.  Am I guaranteed to get a job with this certificate?

This course will give you the skills you need to help you obtain employment, but it’s up to you if you get the job or not.

20.  How will this course assist me with my career?

Studying
and completing this course will show employers that you have the
knowledge in this field, additionally you will gain more confidence in
this area of expertise.

21.  How long is the certificate valid for?

The Certificates are valid for life and do not need renewing. 

22.  Can I take more than one course at a time?

Courses
are studied online at your own pace and you are free to study as many
or as few courses as you wish, we also offer online course bundles that
allow you to save on additional courses so that you may get all the
topics related to your training goals in one go.

23.  What are the Payment Methods available? Is there a payment plan?

We accept payments via PayPal, Credit Card and Bank Transfer.

Payment Plans: We have partnered with Partial.ly, to offer our own in house payment plan. Everyone is Pre-Approved, providing the initial deposit is paid in full.

To pay via bank transfer contact us info@coursesforsuccess.com

24.  Can I purchase for multiple people?

Yes, you can do this by purchasing individually via website or send us a request via email at info@coursesforsuccess.com

25.  Can I request for an invoice before purchase?

Yes, you can request for an invoice via email at info@coursesforsuccess.com

26.  Purchase for a gift?

Yes, you can purchase this course as a gift, simply send an email to info@coursesforsuccess.com, with the course details and we can accommodate this.

27.  Can I create my own course bundle?

Yes,
you can customize your own bundle. Please send us the complete list
with the exact course link of the courses you'd like to bundle up via
email info@coursesforsuccess.com and we will create them for you. *Each course access, time of completion and certification varies depending on the course type.

28.  How will I contact Courses For Success if I have any questions?

You can contact our support team, at any time through live chat on our website, or email at info@coursesforsuccess.com, or by calling one of our phone numbers depending on which country you are in.  

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Course Bundles

Looking for specific training for yourself or employees. Choose from our Course Bundles below or build you own Bundle, by adding more courses to your cart. Choose different courses or the same course for multiple staff members and receive volume discounts at checkout.

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2 DAY SALE - ENDS 28 MAY

Criminology for Beginners Online Certificate Course

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Original price USD $399
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"This criminology course is so relevant and up-to-date to what I have been lookig for. It was the perfect solution to my problem! This course has been so much help!" Lillian A. Verified Buyer 

Start your exploration into criminology today with this comprehensive online certificate course. It’s designed with simple language to help you understand the fundamentals of forensics, autopsies, types of criminals, processing a crime scene, profiling tactics, and more. Learn from prior cases and expert policing strategies to gain a better insight on criminal justice.

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Course Summary

  • Delivery: Online
  • Access: Unlimited Lifetime
  • Time: Study at your own pace
  • Duration:20 Hours
  • Assessments: Yes
  • Qualification: Certificate
About This Course

Enjoy these Benefits and Get a Better Understanding of Criminal Science!

  • Get an introduction to the discipline of criminology and how it has evolved over time
  • Learn the different approaches to criminology, theories, and different schools of thinking
  • A look into the social theories of crime and the collective behaviors of people who commit crimes
  • The course will discuss the fundamentals of criminal psychology, terminologies, and limitations
  • It will teach you the fundamentals of criminal psychology and psychological profiling
  • Learn the different roles of a criminologist including everyday tasks and duties

Study Criminology for Beginners Online Course and Learn the Types of Criminals, Processing a Scene of Crime, Profiling Methods

Our beginner criminology course is for those who want to learn about criminology for enjoyment or as a taster towards further study and accreditation. It is designed in simple language to help students grasp the fundamentals of forensics, autopsies, types of criminals, processing a crime scene, profiling tactics, and will look at prior cases and policing strategies, as well as criminal justice.

Primarily concentrating on murder cases the student will be able to gather an understanding of how autopsies provide information and clues not just to cause of death but also the life style of the victim and the possible identity of the perpetrator of the crime. For more information about this course and similar courses, you can visit our Criminology Online Courses.

To successfully complete this course, a student must:
  • Have access to the internet and the necessary technical skills to navigate the online learning resources

  • Have access to any mobile device with internet connectivity (laptop, desktop, tablet)

  • Be a self-directed learner

  • Possess sound language and literacy skills

Quick Course Facts
  1. Beginner criminology course content is structured for easy comprehension

  2. Registered students gain unrestricted access to the Criminology for Beginners Online Course

  3. All course material is available online 24/7 and can be accessed using any device

  4. Study online from anywhere in your own time at your own pace

  5. All students who complete the course will be awarded with a certificate of completion

Criminology for Beginners Online Course Outline

Module 1: Introduction

This is the first module in the beginner criminology course. This course section will introduce the discipline of criminology and its evolution over time. We will also discuss how technology improvements have influenced how criminal investigators think about and evaluate crime.

Criminology and Criminal Justice

While the terms criminology and criminal justice may appear interchangeable, there is a substantial distinction between the two. The former relates to the objective study of crime, focusing on the field's scientific and scholarly components. The latter looks at how society responds to crime, including police, criminal courts, correctional institutions, and juvenile justice systems.

History and Evolution of Criminology

The beginnings of criminology may be traced back to initiatives attempted to alter the criminal justice and prison systems as early as 200 years ago. Cesare Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham were two of the most influential authors whose work established the classical school of criminology. According to this school of thinking, torture of the accused for confessions, testimony, and punishment should be prohibited. People should be penalized for acting on their own free choice and fully conscious of their acts. The penalties must be severe enough to compensate for the illicit benefit.

The Importance of Studying Crime

Crime is unavoidable, and it grows as society becomes more complicated. Political, cultural, socioeconomic, and technical developments all impact crime; thus, it's critical to reform policing when the need arises to stay current.

Case Study: Community-Based Policing

When Chief George K. Hansen announced the concept to the public in 1975, the Lincoln Police Department embraced community-based policing. Although comparable attempts to replace existing tactics with "neighbourhood-based team policing" have been made in Los Angeles, Cincinnati, and other cities, the Los Angeles Police Department has proved to be the movement's pioneer. Employee solutions and dozens of general ideas have been integrated. They also recognized their strengths and shortcomings over time, which helped them allocate resources to needed development.

The Role of Technology

The advancement of technology and the ongoing emergence of new inventions in the area have improved police and law enforcement. It has also aided in crime prevention to some level, as new technologies to increase personal safety and security are developed. There are two types of innovations to consider: hard and soft. Complex technology refers to physical materials and equipment that serve many segments