Infectious Diseases and Infection Control (Self Paced) Online Certificate Course

Learn Basic Techniques and Procedures for Preventing the Transmission of Infectious Disease

Infectious Diseases and Infection Control (Self Paced) Online Certificate Course

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Take an In-depth Look into Infectiology with Infection Control with our Popular Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course

Getting your infection control certification online is an effective way to gain critical insights into infectious diseases (infectiology). All health professionals must be aware of the risks of infectious diseases. More than a quarter of all deaths are caused by infectious diseases. Perhaps more worrying still is that millions of people suffer seriously due to the effects of infectious disease. While the short term effects can be dire, many suffer long term ailments as a result of infectious disease.

This infectious disease certificate course provides course participants with valuable insight into the identification and control of infectious disease. The infectious disease certificate online course commences with an introduction to the fundamental techniques and procedures for the prevention of the transmission of infectious diseases.

The course then moves on to look at some of the more widespread and hazardous infectious diseases. This section will cover everything from influenza and hepatitis right through to animal and tick-borne diseases.

Our infectious disease course closes with a thorough analysis of global emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). The developing world, in particular, is struggling to cope with these EIDs. The impacts are felt in whole communities as well as at an individual and family level.

Once you’ve completed this infectious disease online training, you will have the knowledge and confidence to apply the procedures necessary to contain infectious diseases.

What you will learn with our Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course

The online infection control certification course provides a learning opportunity for health professionals in a variety of disciplines. The infectious disease control certificate available through this course will enhance your professional standing as knowledgeable, skilled and dedicated. The course will:

  • Improve your professional marketability
  • Develop your existing skills and competencies
  • Help in meeting any continuing education requirements

Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course - Requirements

The Infectious Disease and Infection Control Course is delivered 100 percent online 24/7.

To successfully complete this course, a student must:

  • Have access to the internet and the necessary technical skills to navigate the online learning resources
  • Have access to any mobile device with internet connectivity (laptop, desktop, tablet)
  • Be a self-directed learner
  • Possess sound language and literacy skills

Quick Course Facts

  1. Course content is structured for easy comprehension
  2. Registered students gain unrestricted access to the Infectious Disease and Infection Control Course
  3. All course material is available online 24/7 and can be accessed using any device
  4. Study online from anywhere in your own time at your own pace
  5. All students who complete the course will be awarded with a certificate of completion

For any additional questions please see our comprehensive FAQS tab above.

Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course Outline

Lesson 1: Infection Control Basics

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the role of healthcare-associated infections in patient safety.
  • List the five most common, preventable healthcare-associated infections.
  • Explain the human biome.
  • Discuss the five categories of Standard Precautions.
  • List the three elements necessary for disease transmission.
  • Explain the three categories of Transmission-Based Precautions.

Every year, people are killed as a result of diseases spreading in hospitals and other healthcare environments. Infection prevention protocols are a critical component of health care and patient safety programs used by all members of the healthcare staff in the United States and around the world.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) is a significant threat to patient welfare, and its detection and prevention must be a top priority in all healthcare environments.

HCAIs will result in the following outcomes:

  • Prolonged hospital stays
  • Long-term disability
  • Increased resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobials

Five Common Preventable HealthCare- Associated Infections:

  • Surgical site infections (SSI)
  • Central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI)
  • Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)

Updated Guidelines:

  • The emergence of new 
  • Renewed concerns for evolving pathogens 

Chapter 3: The Human Microbiome

The Human Microbiome

Some people consider themselves to be "humans" and nothing more, but we are all made up of a swarm of microorganisms that live in and on our bodies. Any individual on the planet is home to approximately 100 trillion bacterial cells, which outnumber human cells by a factor of ten and account for 99.9 percent of the specific genes in the human body. The microbiome, or selection of microbiota in the human body, is the human version of a full natural ecosystem that weights around 3 pounds and determines how the human body works.

Chapter 4: Standard Precautions

Standard Precautions

Standard precautions are the minimum infection control procedures that extend to all medical treatment in every healthcare facility, regardless of the patient's reported or documented infection status. These evidence-based procedures are intended to shield both the healthcare provider and patients from infection.

Updated Guidelines for Standard Precautions:

  • Hand hygiene
  • Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) (such as gloves, gowns, and facemasks) depending on the anticipated type of exposure
  • Respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette

Three Categories of Transmission-Based Precautions:

  • Contact Precautions
  • Droplet Precautions
  • Airborne Precautions

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Hand Hygiene
  • Use of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Respiratory Hygiene and Cough Etiquette
  • Safe Injection Practices
  • Safe Handling of Potentially Contaminated Equipment or Surfaces in the Patient Environment

Chapter 5: Transmission-Based Precautions

Transmission-Based Precautions

Three Elements Required for Transmission of Infectious Agents within a Healthcare Setting:

  • A source (or reservoir) of infectious agents
  • A susceptible host with a port of entry receptive to the agent
  • A mode of transmission for the agent

Sources of Infectious Agents

The majority of infectious agents spread during health care come from humans, but inanimate environmental factors can also have modes of transmission. Patients, hospital workers, family members, and other travelers are also exampling of human reservoirs.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Susceptible Hosts
  • Modes of Transmission
  • Contact Precautions
  • Droplet Precautions
  • Airborne Precautions

Chapter 6: Summary

Every year, thousands of people die as a result of healthcare-associated diseases around the world, causing personal suffering as well as billions of dollars in economic effects on the economy. When infection prevention procedures are taken correctly, they will deter the spread of infectious diseases.

Lesson 2: Influenza: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the types of influenza and how influenza changes over time.
  • Describe the clinical issues related to H1N1 ("swine flu").
  • Identify the clinical issues related to avian influenza.
  • Explain the methods of transmission and clinical symptoms of the influenza virus.
  • List methods of diagnosis for influenza.
  • Describe methods of prevention and control measures for influenza.

Influenza (also known as the "flu") is a particularly infectious respiratory condition that affects people of all ages and can result in serious illness or death. This illness, which affects hundreds of thousands of people worldwide per year, can be avoided by using a variety of techniques. The learner will be able to identify clinical characteristics and treatment strategies for influenza viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 virus, as a result of this course.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Influenza has most likely existed for as long as humans have populated the planet. In 412 BC, Hippocrates mentioned an epidemic of a flu-like disease. The most severe and lethal influenza pandemic in modern history occurred in 1918, when almost 50 million people died worldwide from the "Spanish flu," also known as "La Grippe."

Chapter 3: How Influenza Changes

Two Basic Processes According to Michael et al.:

  • Antigenic drift
  • Antigenic shift

Chapter 4: Types of Influenza

Types of Influenza

Standard nomenclature is used to classify and label influenza strains.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • H1N1 Influenza ("Swine Flu")
  • Avian Influenza ("Bird Flu")

Chapter 5: Transmission

Transmission

The influenza virus spreads primarily by droplets produced when sick people cough or sneeze. Adults will transmit the influenza virus from one day before symptoms appear to about five days after they appear.

Chapter 6: Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Influenza

Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Influenza

Most people's symptoms of uncomplicated influenza disease recover in 3 to 7 days, but the cough and malaise will last for up to 2 weeks.

Chapter 7: Diagnosis

Acceptable specimens include nasal swabs, throat swabs, bronchial washes, sputum, and nasal aspirate. These samples should be collected within the first four days of the disease. But for quick diagnostic testing, most findings require many hours to many days to arrive. Those test results are normally available in 15 minutes or less.

Chapter 8: Prevention and Control Measures

Strategies for the Prevention and Control of Influenza:

  • Stay home if you suspect you are sick.
  • Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds, and other social distancing measures.
  • Wash your hands often (for at least 15 to 20 seconds, about the same amount of time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday").

Chapter 9: Vaccination

Influenza vaccines are recommended for both healthcare workers and others who are at risk of influenza complications. Vaccination is widely regarded as the most successful means of preventing influenza illness and complications.

Chapter 10: Summary

As a particularly infectious respiratory disorder that affects people of all ages and may result in serious illness or death, influenza necessitates that healthcare professionals stay up to date with clinical conditions, medications, and mitigation options. Furthermore, as the front-line team caring for sick people, healthcare professionals must do all they can to remain healthy, recognize signs of illness in themselves, and, if present, meet protocols to avoid the transmission of this disease in the future.

Lesson 3: Pneumonia in Adults and Children

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the various types of pneumonia.
  • Describe the symptoms, treatment, and prevention strategies for the common types of pneumonia.
  • Explain transmission methods, risk factors, and methods of diagnosing pneumonia.

Pneumonia is an inflammation of one or both lungs. It is the leading cause of death for children under the age of five worldwide. It is also widespread in the United States. Pneumonia can be classified into many categories based on the microbe that causes it (bacteria, viruses, or fungi). The learner would be able to explain the epidemiology, signs and symptoms, testing, medication, and preventive measures for pneumonia as a result of this course.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Every year, millions of people are affected by pneumonia, a common respiratory infection. It is a lung infection that can cause moderate to serious disease in people of all ages. Viruses, bacteria, and fungi are also possible causes of pneumonia.

Chapter 3: Epidemiology

Pneumonia is the main infectious cause of death in children worldwide, responsible for 15% to 18% of all deaths of children under the age of five. More than 99 percent of pneumonia deaths occur in the developed world. It impacts children and families worldwide, and it is most common in resource-poor countries in Southern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Chapter 4: Respiratory System Anatomy and Physiology—a Brief Overview

The upper respiratory tract (the nasal cavity, pharynx, and larynx) and lower respiratory tract make up the respiratory system (the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, lungs, pleura, and respiratory membrane). Other components of the respiratory system include the conducting airways, the portions of the central nervous system involved in the operation of the respiratory muscles, and the lungs.

Chapter 5: Types of Pneumonia

Pneumonia comes in many varieties. Some are named for the way the virus is contracted.

  • Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)
  • Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)
  • Healthcare-associated pneumonia

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Legionnaires' Disease
  • Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 6: Summary

Pneumonia is the primary cause of death of children under the age of five worldwide. Pneumonia, an inflammation of the lungs caused by a variety of bacteria, should be avoided. Individuals at risk for the illness, as well as those who become sick with pneumonia, will benefit from vaccines, antibiotics, and antiviral medications.

Lesson 4: Tuberculosis

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the United States and globally.
  • Identify signs and symptoms of TB and MDR-TB.
  • Describe how tuberculosis is spread and risk factors for contracting TB and MDR-TB.
  • State tests and treatment strategies for tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.
  • List strategies to prevent the transmission of TB and MDR-TB.

Despite advancements in care and prevention, tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) continue to be two of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. TB and MDR-TB, an ancient disease discovered in Egyptian mummies, are becoming more difficult to control, owing in part to the advent of drug-resistant forms of the disease and a shortage of funding to combat the disease.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Tuberculosis (TB) is now one of the most lethal communicable diseases on the planet. Tubercular death has been discovered in the spines of thousands of year-old Egyptian mummies. Tuberculosis was also popular in ancient Greece and Rome. Although tuberculosis has been significantly diminished as a result of the discovery of the mycobacterium that causes it and the production of vaccines and drugs to cure it, it has never been truly eradicated.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of TB
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 3: Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB)

The advent of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and highly or extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) presents a severe and significant challenge to global TB prevention programs. MDR-TB is a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain that has elevated levels of resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin, with or without resistance to other anti-TB medications.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of MDR-TB
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 4: Summary

The proper identification and care of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates an early, correct diagnosis and a treatment plan that patients should adhere to. The best ways to counter the danger are to avoid the emergence of drug resistance through high-quality treatment of drug-susceptible TB, expand rapid monitoring and identification of drug-resistant TB cases, provide immediate access to adequate treatment and proper care, and prevent disease spread through the rapid introduction of effective infection control steps.

Lesson 5: The ABCs of Hepatitis

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the epidemiology, assessment, risk factors, modes of transmission, treatments, and prevention strategies for hepatitis A virus (HAV).
  • Identify the possible outcomes when testing for HAV.
  • Describe the epidemiology, assessment, risk factors, modes of transmission, treatments, and prevention strategies for hepatitis B virus (HBV).
  • Identify the possible outcomes when testing for HBV.
  • Describe the epidemiology, assessment, risk factors, modes of transmission, testing, treatments, and prevention strategies for hepatitis C virus (HCV).
  • Identify the possible outcomes when testing for HCV.
  • List prevention strategies for HAV, HBV, and HCV.

Chapter 2: Hepatitis A Virus (HAV)

Hepatitis A is a virus-infected liver disease that can cause moderate to serious illness. This illness, caused by the hepatitis A virus, spreads when an uninfected person consumes food or drink polluted by an infected person's feces or blood. The illness is strongly linked to contaminated water, insufficient sanitation, and poor personal hygiene.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of Hepatitis A
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 3: Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a potentially fatal liver infection caused by the Hepadnaviridae family's hepatitis B virus (HBV), a thin, circular, partly double-stranded DNA virus. It is a major public health problem as well as a significant workplace threat for health professionals. Hepatitis B is spread when blood, sperm, or another body fluid from an infected person reaches the body of an uninfected person.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of HBV
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 4: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV is a bloodborne virus that can cause both acute and chronic hepatitis infections, with symptoms ranging from a minor disease that lasts a few weeks to a debilitating, life-threatening illness. HCV comes in a variety of strains (or genotypes), and their distribution varies by area.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of HCV
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Hepatitis C and Nutrition
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 5: Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D is a liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis D virus (HDV). The hepatitis D virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that involves the hepatitis B virus (HBV) for replication. HDV infection happens only in conjunction with or as a result of a superinfection with HBV. HDV infects and damages the liver.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatment Strategies
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 6: Hepatitis E

Hepatitis E is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV). The HEV, a small virus with a positive-sense, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome, is responsible for this disease.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatment Strategies
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 7: Summary

Hepatitis viruses cause liver damage and have a number of etiologies and modes of transmission. Since infected people can take weeks or months to heal before returning to school, work, or their everyday lives, these viruses can have major economic and social effects in societies. The long-term effects of viral infections vary, but they can result in severe, permanent health problems. Prevention, early diagnosis, and timely treatment are critical in halting the transmission of these diseases.

Lesson 6: HIV/AIDS Education for Healthcare Professionals

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the basic epidemiological and medical information about HIV/AIDS.
  • Identify risk behaviors that contribute to the transmission of HIV/AIDS.
  • Relate the stages of HIV/AIDS (including oral manifestations) to the diseases and conditions they can cause.
  • Describe opportunistic diseases that define HIV/AIDS.
  • Explain the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Opt-Out Testing Recommendations.
  • Explain methods of HIV transmission and strategies for prevention.
  • Explain how to effectively use a male and female condom.
  • Describe current recognized methods of testing.
  • Describe current recognized methods of treatment.
  • Summarize the elements of effective HIV management in the workplace, including postexposure management.
  • Explain the professional, ethical, and legal standards that apply to a caregiver of an individual with HIV/AIDS.
  • Appraise the appropriate behaviors and attitudes of caregivers toward persons living with HIV/AIDS.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have remained a constant and pervasive threat to the health, well-being, and human potential of individuals in the United States and around the world since they were first identified in 1981, more than a quarter-century ago. HIV and AIDS continue to be foreign health challenges, causing anxiety, shame, and accusations, undermining the immune system, and possibly leading to a variety of viruses, diseases, or death.

Chapter 2: Introduction

It all started in 1981 with a small correspondence published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Study, a journal of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (MMWR). According to the communication, from October 1980 to May 1981, a group of five young, previously stable homosexual men were treated for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP).

Chapter 3: HIV/AIDS Basics

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a form of retrovirus that infects immune system cells in humans.

  • HIV type 1 (HIV-1)
  • HIV type 2 (HIV-2)

Chapter 4: HIV/AIDS Epidemiology—United States

According to the CDC, more than 1.2 million people in the United States are infected with HIV. One of every seven of these people is ignorant of the infection. Very many patients are detected too late in their infection's path.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • HIV/AIDS and Aging

Chapter 5: HIV/AIDS Epidemiology—Globally

Globally, HIV/AIDS is a major public health concern.

  • More than 30 million people have died of AIDS since 1981.
  • Approximately 8,000 people die every day of treatable AIDS-related disease.
  • Africa has more than 14 million AIDS orphans.

Chapter 6: Clinical Manifestation of HIV and AIDS

Many HIV-infected individuals are unaware that they are infected. They sometimes may not get sick right away until they develop a seroconversion, also known as "acute retroviral syndrome." They can develop a glandular fever-like illness with a fever, rash, joint pains, and swollen lymph nodes in this situation. Seroconversion normally occurs between 2 and 8 weeks of HIV infection.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Incubation Period

Chapter 7: HIV and Opportunistic Diseases

The following opportunistic infections (OIs) appear to cause morbidity and mortality in HIV-1 patients worldwide. With some patients, treatment with combined antiretroviral therapy decreases the occurrence of OIs, while for those who do not have access to health services, the effects of OIs are serious.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Oral Manifestations
  • Diagnostics & Treatment of Oral Manifestations
  • HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)
  • HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
  • Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and HIV
  • Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and HIV

Chapter 8: Methods of Transmission and Risk Behaviors Associated With HIV/AIDS

Risky HIV/AIDS activity is classified into three groups. Since the discovery of HIV, no significant developments in these modes of transmission have been reported. The number of diseases that may occur as a result of each path varies considerably across communities and countries.

Three common Methods of Transmission:

  • Sexual Transmission
  • Blood Transmission
  • Mother-to-Child (perinatal) Transmission

Chapter 9: Prevention Strategies

"Any action or attempt performed to minimize the risk of an unfavorable health incident or process beginning, continuing, or deteriorating" is described as prevention. Prevention activities target a variety of risk factors, such as personal, cultural, or situational features linked to particular health incidents. Effective preventive messages are directed to individual populations, and those who receive them are more likely to comply. Effective preventive messages are tailored to individual markets and their features.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Sexual Transmission Prevention Strategies
  • How To Use a Male Condom
  • How To Use a Female Condom
  • Blood Transmission Prevention Strategies
  • National and International Prevention Strategies

Chapter 10: Testing

When HIV testing was first made available in 1985, the primary aim was to monitor the blood stream. By 1987, the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) released recommendations that made HIV therapy and monitoring a priority as a prevention measure for those who were most likely to be affected or who engaged in high-risk activities.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Antibody Test
  • RNA Test
  • Other Body Fluid Tests
  • Further Assessment
  • Partner Counseling and Referral Services (PCRS)

Chapter 11: Current Recognized Methods of Treatment

When HIV testing was first made available in 1985, the primary aim was to monitor the blood stream. By 1987, the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) released recommendations that made HIV therapy and monitoring a priority as a prevention measure for those who were most likely to be affected or who engaged in high-risk activities.

Chapter 12: Effective HIV Management in the Workplace

When delivering first aid or health treatment, universal safeguards are a series of precautions intended to prevent the spread of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and other bloodborne pathogens. According to the CDC, all patients' blood and body fluids are considered highly infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens under universal safeguards.

Chapter 13: Professional, Ethical, and Legal Standards of Care

The successful treatment of HIV/AIDS patients necessitates integrity as well as adherence to ethical and legal quality of care.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Consent to Treat
  • Confidentiality
  • Americans With Disabilities Act

Chapter 14: The Effective Caregiver—Appropriate Attitudes and Behaviors Toward Those Infected With HIV

The willingness of healthcare practitioners to offer reliable, supportive treatment to clients with HIV, as well as their spouses and family members, is dependent on their attitudes and behaviors.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Cultural Sensitivity
  • Teaching
  • HIV Stigma and Discrimination

Chapter 15: Summary

HIV/AIDS has been with us for over 30 years. When this emerging illness was first "discovered," both the medical world and the general public were terrified. They didn't get it, and there were stigmas associated with its spread. Throughout it all, healthcare professionals were at the forefront of caring for HIV/AIDS patients and their families.

Lesson 7: Zoonoses: Can Your Pet Make You Sick?

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Define zoonoses.
  • Describe dermatophytes and types of animals most likely to transmit them.
  • Identify the four major categories of zoonoses as listed by the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • Describe the causes, signs, symptoms, treatments of salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, cat-scratch disease (CSD), leptospirosis, trematodosis, toxoplasmosis, rabies, avian influenza, dermatophytosis, and sporotrichosis.
  • Describe the role of animals in each of the zoonoses categories.
  • Identify common human diseases in which animals are not the source of transmission.
  • Identify diseases spread from humans to animals.
  • Explain methods of preventing zoonoses.

Animals are an integral part of many people's lives, offering vital social connections, moral comfort, and pleasure. Pets and other animals can contribute to a therapeutic atmosphere by providing companionship, assistance, sensory stimuli, the desire for activity, a feeling of peace, and a degree of acceptance that is also difficult to find elsewhere.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Many people consider their dogs to be members of their own. Animals are sometimes regarded as partners as a result of these special relationships. The human-animal relationship has been portrayed and praised in ancient literature, contemporary fiction, and scientific reports in scholarly journals. Animals have many health benefits to humans, whether through pet ownership or through rehabilitation or service services.

Chapter 3: Bacterial Zoonoses

Categories of Bacterial Zoonoses:

  • Salmonellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis
  • Cat-scratch disease (CSD)
  • Leptospirosis

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Salmonellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis

Chapter 4: Cat-Scratch Disease (CSD)

CSD, also known as cat scratch fever or subacute regional lymphadenitis, is a rare, self-limiting bacterial infection. It was first described in 1889 as a debilitating, regional lymphadenopathy caused by a cat scratch.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Leptospirosis

Chapter 5: Parasitic Zoonoses

Toxoplasmosis and trematodosis are examples of parasitic zoonoses.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Trematodosis
  • Chlonorchiasis
  • Fascioliasis
  • Opisthorchis

Chapter 6: Viral Zoonoses

Several diseases, including rabies and avian influenza, are included in the group of viral zoonoses, which are discussed in this section.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Rabies
  • Avian Influenza

Chapter 7: Fungal Zoonoses

Dermatophytoses and sporotrichosis are the most common fungal zoonoses.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Dermatophytes (Ringworm or Tinea)
  • Sporotrichosis

Chapter 8: Diseases in Which Animals Are Not the Source

Humans wrongly blame their pets for a variety of diseases or infestations. Head lice, pinworms, and Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci infections are examples of these. Healthcare providers often advise their customers to send their pets to a doctor for treatment, but these infections are transmitted by viruses that live and propagate in people, not their pets.

Chapter 9: Diseases Spread From Humans to Animals

Animals can contract diseases from humans, according to new research. Primates, for example, will contract polio and measles (Bender & Minicucci, 2007). Mycobacterium tuberculosis has also been found in dogs (and all have lived with a clinically ill human). MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) has been found in cats, dogs, goats, and pigs, indicating that MRSA is spreading.

Chapter 10: Methods of Preventing Human Infection

Educating pet owners is one of the most effective ways to deter zoonoses. Pregnant patients and immunocompromised people are more vulnerable to infection.

Chapter 11: Summary

Although many zoonoses are associated with wild animals, many can also be spread by domestic pets. However, the likelihood of transmission and severe infection remains minimal. Keeping a sterile, healing area entails avoiding infections that can be spread by pets and wildlife. Education and the use of reliable, efficient grooming practices are the keys to prevention, allowing humans to share more fun encounters with animals in a healthy manner.

Lesson 8: Tickborne Diseases

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain how ticks infect their host.
  • Identify how Lyme disease is spread.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease.
  • Discuss the methods for diagnosing and treating Lyme disease.
  • Describe other tickborne diseases found in the United States.
  • List ways to prevent tickborne diseases and properly remove a tick.

Ticks in the United States hold a wide range of viruses that can cause a host of human diseases. Lyme disorder is one of the most prevalent of these. Many tick-borne viruses are difficult to identify because their symptoms mimic those of other common illnesses. Tick-borne disease control entails avoiding tick-infested habitats, wearing protective footwear, and using mosquito repellents.

Chapter 2: Introduction

In the United States, there are many tick-borne diseases. Lyme disorder is the most well-known. However, over a dozen lesser-known tick-borne diseases have been reported in the United States, and about six tickborne diseases are present worldwide. This course focuses on tick-borne diseases in the United States, with a particular emphasis on the most well-known and prevalent.

Chapter 3: How Ticks Infect Their Hosts

Ticks are unable to fly or leap, so they must locate a host by settling on the tips of grasses and shrubs in a role known as "questing." Their lower legs grip the grass or trees, and their upper pairs of legs are outstretched, ready to leap onto a moving host. When the host brushes against the tick's resting place, the tick immediately climbs onto the host and searches for a place to bite the host to get its "blood meal."

Chapter 4: Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected deer tick (or blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus). The nymphal (immature) type of the tick is responsible for the majority of human cases. Adult ticks are about the size of a sesame seed, while nymphs are about the size of a poppy seed.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Incidence
  • How Is Lyme Disease Spread?
  • Signs and Symptoms
  • Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS)
  • Coinfections
  • Diagnosis and Treatment
  • Treatment
  • Vaccines

Chapter 5: Other Tickborne Diseases

Other common tick-borne diseases are summarized in the table below.

Chapter 6: Prevention of Tickborne Diseases

The most common way to avoid tick-borne diseases is to avoid tick habitats. In many regions and seasons, many ticks live in wooded, brushy, or grassy areas. Several care should be taken during outdoor activity to avoid ticks off the skin.

Chapter 7: Proper Removal of a Tick

  • To remove a tick, use a pointed (fine-tipped) tweezer. If you don’t have tweezers, put on gloves or cover your hands with tissue paper, and then use your fingers. Do not handle the tick with bare hands. Grab the tick's mouth parts close to the skin (the body will be above the skin), and slowly pull the tick straight out with steady outward pressure, until the tick lets go.
  • Do not grab the tick around its swollen belly or you could push infected fluid from the tick into your body.
  • Do not twist or jerk the tick because this can cause mouth parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth parts with tweezers.

Chapter 8: Summary

The effects of tick-borne diseases on an individual's health can vary from moderate to fatal. The symptoms will last for weeks or years and have a significant impact on any part of a person's life. Rapid and precise diagnosis, as well as successful therapies, are critical in deciding the outcome of these diseases.

Lesson 9: Emerging Global Infectious Diseases

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Lesson 1 - Infection Control Basics
Learn basic infection control procedures which are a vital part of health care and patient safety measures used by every member of the healthcare team both in the United States and globally.

Lesson 2 - Influenza: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention
Striking hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide every year, influenza can be prevented using a combination of techniques which you will learn in this course.

Lesson 3 - Pneumonia in Adults and Children
Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of the lungs. Globally, it is the leading killer of children under the age of 5 years. It is also common in the United States. There are several types of pneumonia, depending on the type of germ (bacteria, virus, or fungi) that causes it and you will learn to control and treat them in this course.

Lesson 4 - Tuberculosis
Despite advances in their treatment and prevention, tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB, or MDR-TB remain two of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. An ancient disease found in Egyptian mummies, TB and MDR-TB are increasingly difficult to treat, due, in part, to the emergence of drug-resistant strains of the disease and the resources necessary to fight the disease.

Lesson 5 - The ABCs of Hepatitis
All forms of hepatitis can have significant economic and social consequences since infected individuals can take weeks or months to recover and return to school, work, or their daily lives. Long-term consequences of the viruses vary but can include serious, chronic health consequences including cirrhosis and liver cancer. Prevention, early diagnosis, and effective treatment are essential in preventing the spread of these diseases.

Lesson 6 - HIV/AIDS Education for Health Care Professionals
Causing fear, guilt, and accusations, weakening the immune system and potentially leading to numerous infections, cancers, or death, HIV and AIDS remain international health issues. They require that health care providers be knowledgeable about the complex clinical aspects of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, as well as address ethical, cultural, and empowerment issues, and implement evolving infection control guidelines.

Lesson 7 - Zoonosis: Can Your Pet Make You Sick?
Pets and other animals can contribute to a healing environment with their companionship, assistance, sensory stimulation, need for exercise, sense of calmness, and level of acceptance that is often difficult to find from any other source. Yet many diseases can be spread from pets to people. These diseases, called zoonosis, can involve bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. People can also infect pets, as well. Maintaining a healing environment for all includes the prevention of infections from pets and other animals.

Lesson 8 - Tick-Borne Diseases
In the United States, ticks carry many different pathogens that can cause a variety of human diseases. One of the most common of these is Lyme disease. Many tickborne diseases are challenging to diagnose because their symptoms imitate other common illnesses. The prevention of tickborne disease involves avoidance of tick-infested areas, the appropriate use of proper clothing, and insect repellents.

Lesson 9 - Emerging Global Infectious Diseases
Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) present an ever-present threat to the health and livelihood of individuals, families, communities, and countries all over the world. The greatest burden of EIDs lies in developing countries and with infants and children who are the most vulnerable to these infections and the long-term consequences of their presence.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet.

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

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About this Course

Take an In-depth Look into Infectiology with Infection Control with our Popular Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course

Getting your infection control certification online is an effective way to gain critical insights into infectious diseases (infectiology). All health professionals must be aware of the risks of infectious diseases. More than a quarter of all deaths are caused by infectious diseases. Perhaps more worrying still is that millions of people suffer seriously due to the effects of infectious disease. While the short term effects can be dire, many suffer long term ailments as a result of infectious disease.

This infectious disease certificate course provides course participants with valuable insight into the identification and control of infectious disease. The infectious disease certificate online course commences with an introduction to the fundamental techniques and procedures for the prevention of the transmission of infectious diseases.

The course then moves on to look at some of the more widespread and hazardous infectious diseases. This section will cover everything from influenza and hepatitis right through to animal and tick-borne diseases.

Our infectious disease course closes with a thorough analysis of global emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). The developing world, in particular, is struggling to cope with these EIDs. The impacts are felt in whole communities as well as at an individual and family level.

Once you’ve completed this infectious disease online training, you will have the knowledge and confidence to apply the procedures necessary to contain infectious diseases.

What you will learn with our Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course

The online infection control certification course provides a learning opportunity for health professionals in a variety of disciplines. The infectious disease control certificate available through this course will enhance your professional standing as knowledgeable, skilled and dedicated. The course will:

  • Improve your professional marketability
  • Develop your existing skills and competencies
  • Help in meeting any continuing education requirements

Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course - Requirements

The Infectious Disease and Infection Control Course is delivered 100 percent online 24/7.

To successfully complete this course, a student must:

  • Have access to the internet and the necessary technical skills to navigate the online learning resources
  • Have access to any mobile device with internet connectivity (laptop, desktop, tablet)
  • Be a self-directed learner
  • Possess sound language and literacy skills

Quick Course Facts

  1. Course content is structured for easy comprehension
  2. Registered students gain unrestricted access to the Infectious Disease and Infection Control Course
  3. All course material is available online 24/7 and can be accessed using any device
  4. Study online from anywhere in your own time at your own pace
  5. All students who complete the course will be awarded with a certificate of completion

For any additional questions please see our comprehensive FAQS tab above.

Infectious Disease and Infection Control Online Course Outline

Lesson 1: Infection Control Basics

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the role of healthcare-associated infections in patient safety.
  • List the five most common, preventable healthcare-associated infections.
  • Explain the human biome.
  • Discuss the five categories of Standard Precautions.
  • List the three elements necessary for disease transmission.
  • Explain the three categories of Transmission-Based Precautions.

Every year, people are killed as a result of diseases spreading in hospitals and other healthcare environments. Infection prevention protocols are a critical component of health care and patient safety programs used by all members of the healthcare staff in the United States and around the world.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) is a significant threat to patient welfare, and its detection and prevention must be a top priority in all healthcare environments.

HCAIs will result in the following outcomes:

  • Prolonged hospital stays
  • Long-term disability
  • Increased resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobials

Five Common Preventable HealthCare- Associated Infections:

  • Surgical site infections (SSI)
  • Central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI)
  • Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)

Updated Guidelines:

  • The emergence of new 
  • Renewed concerns for evolving pathogens 

Chapter 3: The Human Microbiome

The Human Microbiome

Some people consider themselves to be "humans" and nothing more, but we are all made up of a swarm of microorganisms that live in and on our bodies. Any individual on the planet is home to approximately 100 trillion bacterial cells, which outnumber human cells by a factor of ten and account for 99.9 percent of the specific genes in the human body. The microbiome, or selection of microbiota in the human body, is the human version of a full natural ecosystem that weights around 3 pounds and determines how the human body works.

Chapter 4: Standard Precautions

Standard Precautions

Standard precautions are the minimum infection control procedures that extend to all medical treatment in every healthcare facility, regardless of the patient's reported or documented infection status. These evidence-based procedures are intended to shield both the healthcare provider and patients from infection.

Updated Guidelines for Standard Precautions:

  • Hand hygiene
  • Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) (such as gloves, gowns, and facemasks) depending on the anticipated type of exposure
  • Respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette

Three Categories of Transmission-Based Precautions:

  • Contact Precautions
  • Droplet Precautions
  • Airborne Precautions

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Hand Hygiene
  • Use of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Respiratory Hygiene and Cough Etiquette
  • Safe Injection Practices
  • Safe Handling of Potentially Contaminated Equipment or Surfaces in the Patient Environment

Chapter 5: Transmission-Based Precautions

Transmission-Based Precautions

Three Elements Required for Transmission of Infectious Agents within a Healthcare Setting:

  • A source (or reservoir) of infectious agents
  • A susceptible host with a port of entry receptive to the agent
  • A mode of transmission for the agent

Sources of Infectious Agents

The majority of infectious agents spread during health care come from humans, but inanimate environmental factors can also have modes of transmission. Patients, hospital workers, family members, and other travelers are also exampling of human reservoirs.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Susceptible Hosts
  • Modes of Transmission
  • Contact Precautions
  • Droplet Precautions
  • Airborne Precautions

Chapter 6: Summary

Every year, thousands of people die as a result of healthcare-associated diseases around the world, causing personal suffering as well as billions of dollars in economic effects on the economy. When infection prevention procedures are taken correctly, they will deter the spread of infectious diseases.

Lesson 2: Influenza: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the types of influenza and how influenza changes over time.
  • Describe the clinical issues related to H1N1 ("swine flu").
  • Identify the clinical issues related to avian influenza.
  • Explain the methods of transmission and clinical symptoms of the influenza virus.
  • List methods of diagnosis for influenza.
  • Describe methods of prevention and control measures for influenza.

Influenza (also known as the "flu") is a particularly infectious respiratory condition that affects people of all ages and can result in serious illness or death. This illness, which affects hundreds of thousands of people worldwide per year, can be avoided by using a variety of techniques. The learner will be able to identify clinical characteristics and treatment strategies for influenza viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 virus, as a result of this course.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Influenza has most likely existed for as long as humans have populated the planet. In 412 BC, Hippocrates mentioned an epidemic of a flu-like disease. The most severe and lethal influenza pandemic in modern history occurred in 1918, when almost 50 million people died worldwide from the "Spanish flu," also known as "La Grippe."

Chapter 3: How Influenza Changes

Two Basic Processes According to Michael et al.:

  • Antigenic drift
  • Antigenic shift

Chapter 4: Types of Influenza

Types of Influenza

Standard nomenclature is used to classify and label influenza strains.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • H1N1 Influenza ("Swine Flu")
  • Avian Influenza ("Bird Flu")

Chapter 5: Transmission

Transmission

The influenza virus spreads primarily by droplets produced when sick people cough or sneeze. Adults will transmit the influenza virus from one day before symptoms appear to about five days after they appear.

Chapter 6: Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Influenza

Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Influenza

Most people's symptoms of uncomplicated influenza disease recover in 3 to 7 days, but the cough and malaise will last for up to 2 weeks.

Chapter 7: Diagnosis

Acceptable specimens include nasal swabs, throat swabs, bronchial washes, sputum, and nasal aspirate. These samples should be collected within the first four days of the disease. But for quick diagnostic testing, most findings require many hours to many days to arrive. Those test results are normally available in 15 minutes or less.

Chapter 8: Prevention and Control Measures

Strategies for the Prevention and Control of Influenza:

  • Stay home if you suspect you are sick.
  • Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds, and other social distancing measures.
  • Wash your hands often (for at least 15 to 20 seconds, about the same amount of time it takes to sing "Happy Birthday").

Chapter 9: Vaccination

Influenza vaccines are recommended for both healthcare workers and others who are at risk of influenza complications. Vaccination is widely regarded as the most successful means of preventing influenza illness and complications.

Chapter 10: Summary

As a particularly infectious respiratory disorder that affects people of all ages and may result in serious illness or death, influenza necessitates that healthcare professionals stay up to date with clinical conditions, medications, and mitigation options. Furthermore, as the front-line team caring for sick people, healthcare professionals must do all they can to remain healthy, recognize signs of illness in themselves, and, if present, meet protocols to avoid the transmission of this disease in the future.

Lesson 3: Pneumonia in Adults and Children

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the various types of pneumonia.
  • Describe the symptoms, treatment, and prevention strategies for the common types of pneumonia.
  • Explain transmission methods, risk factors, and methods of diagnosing pneumonia.

Pneumonia is an inflammation of one or both lungs. It is the leading cause of death for children under the age of five worldwide. It is also widespread in the United States. Pneumonia can be classified into many categories based on the microbe that causes it (bacteria, viruses, or fungi). The learner would be able to explain the epidemiology, signs and symptoms, testing, medication, and preventive measures for pneumonia as a result of this course.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Every year, millions of people are affected by pneumonia, a common respiratory infection. It is a lung infection that can cause moderate to serious disease in people of all ages. Viruses, bacteria, and fungi are also possible causes of pneumonia.

Chapter 3: Epidemiology

Pneumonia is the main infectious cause of death in children worldwide, responsible for 15% to 18% of all deaths of children under the age of five. More than 99 percent of pneumonia deaths occur in the developed world. It impacts children and families worldwide, and it is most common in resource-poor countries in Southern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Chapter 4: Respiratory System Anatomy and Physiology—a Brief Overview

The upper respiratory tract (the nasal cavity, pharynx, and larynx) and lower respiratory tract make up the respiratory system (the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, lungs, pleura, and respiratory membrane). Other components of the respiratory system include the conducting airways, the portions of the central nervous system involved in the operation of the respiratory muscles, and the lungs.

Chapter 5: Types of Pneumonia

Pneumonia comes in many varieties. Some are named for the way the virus is contracted.

  • Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)
  • Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)
  • Healthcare-associated pneumonia

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Legionnaires' Disease
  • Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 6: Summary

Pneumonia is the primary cause of death of children under the age of five worldwide. Pneumonia, an inflammation of the lungs caused by a variety of bacteria, should be avoided. Individuals at risk for the illness, as well as those who become sick with pneumonia, will benefit from vaccines, antibiotics, and antiviral medications.

Lesson 4: Tuberculosis

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the United States and globally.
  • Identify signs and symptoms of TB and MDR-TB.
  • Describe how tuberculosis is spread and risk factors for contracting TB and MDR-TB.
  • State tests and treatment strategies for tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.
  • List strategies to prevent the transmission of TB and MDR-TB.

Despite advancements in care and prevention, tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) continue to be two of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. TB and MDR-TB, an ancient disease discovered in Egyptian mummies, are becoming more difficult to control, owing in part to the advent of drug-resistant forms of the disease and a shortage of funding to combat the disease.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Tuberculosis (TB) is now one of the most lethal communicable diseases on the planet. Tubercular death has been discovered in the spines of thousands of year-old Egyptian mummies. Tuberculosis was also popular in ancient Greece and Rome. Although tuberculosis has been significantly diminished as a result of the discovery of the mycobacterium that causes it and the production of vaccines and drugs to cure it, it has never been truly eradicated.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of TB
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 3: Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB)

The advent of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and highly or extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) presents a severe and significant challenge to global TB prevention programs. MDR-TB is a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain that has elevated levels of resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin, with or without resistance to other anti-TB medications.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of MDR-TB
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 4: Summary

The proper identification and care of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates an early, correct diagnosis and a treatment plan that patients should adhere to. The best ways to counter the danger are to avoid the emergence of drug resistance through high-quality treatment of drug-susceptible TB, expand rapid monitoring and identification of drug-resistant TB cases, provide immediate access to adequate treatment and proper care, and prevent disease spread through the rapid introduction of effective infection control steps.

Lesson 5: The ABCs of Hepatitis

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the epidemiology, assessment, risk factors, modes of transmission, treatments, and prevention strategies for hepatitis A virus (HAV).
  • Identify the possible outcomes when testing for HAV.
  • Describe the epidemiology, assessment, risk factors, modes of transmission, treatments, and prevention strategies for hepatitis B virus (HBV).
  • Identify the possible outcomes when testing for HBV.
  • Describe the epidemiology, assessment, risk factors, modes of transmission, testing, treatments, and prevention strategies for hepatitis C virus (HCV).
  • Identify the possible outcomes when testing for HCV.
  • List prevention strategies for HAV, HBV, and HCV.

Chapter 2: Hepatitis A Virus (HAV)

Hepatitis A is a virus-infected liver disease that can cause moderate to serious illness. This illness, caused by the hepatitis A virus, spreads when an uninfected person consumes food or drink polluted by an infected person's feces or blood. The illness is strongly linked to contaminated water, insufficient sanitation, and poor personal hygiene.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of Hepatitis A
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 3: Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)

Hepatitis B is a potentially fatal liver infection caused by the Hepadnaviridae family's hepatitis B virus (HBV), a thin, circular, partly double-stranded DNA virus. It is a major public health problem as well as a significant workplace threat for health professionals. Hepatitis B is spread when blood, sperm, or another body fluid from an infected person reaches the body of an uninfected person.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of HBV
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 4: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV is a bloodborne virus that can cause both acute and chronic hepatitis infections, with symptoms ranging from a minor disease that lasts a few weeks to a debilitating, life-threatening illness. HCV comes in a variety of strains (or genotypes), and their distribution varies by area.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms of HCV
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatments
  • Hepatitis C and Nutrition
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 5: Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D is a liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis D virus (HDV). The hepatitis D virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that involves the hepatitis B virus (HBV) for replication. HDV infection happens only in conjunction with or as a result of a superinfection with HBV. HDV infects and damages the liver.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatment Strategies
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 6: Hepatitis E

Hepatitis E is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV). The HEV, a small virus with a positive-sense, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome, is responsible for this disease.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Assessment—Signs and Symptoms
  • Transmission Methods
  • Risk Factors
  • Testing
  • Treatment Strategies
  • Prevention Strategies

Chapter 7: Summary

Hepatitis viruses cause liver damage and have a number of etiologies and modes of transmission. Since infected people can take weeks or months to heal before returning to school, work, or their everyday lives, these viruses can have major economic and social effects in societies. The long-term effects of viral infections vary, but they can result in severe, permanent health problems. Prevention, early diagnosis, and timely treatment are critical in halting the transmission of these diseases.

Lesson 6: HIV/AIDS Education for Healthcare Professionals

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the basic epidemiological and medical information about HIV/AIDS.
  • Identify risk behaviors that contribute to the transmission of HIV/AIDS.
  • Relate the stages of HIV/AIDS (including oral manifestations) to the diseases and conditions they can cause.
  • Describe opportunistic diseases that define HIV/AIDS.
  • Explain the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Opt-Out Testing Recommendations.
  • Explain methods of HIV transmission and strategies for prevention.
  • Explain how to effectively use a male and female condom.
  • Describe current recognized methods of testing.
  • Describe current recognized methods of treatment.
  • Summarize the elements of effective HIV management in the workplace, including postexposure management.
  • Explain the professional, ethical, and legal standards that apply to a caregiver of an individual with HIV/AIDS.
  • Appraise the appropriate behaviors and attitudes of caregivers toward persons living with HIV/AIDS.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have remained a constant and pervasive threat to the health, well-being, and human potential of individuals in the United States and around the world since they were first identified in 1981, more than a quarter-century ago. HIV and AIDS continue to be foreign health challenges, causing anxiety, shame, and accusations, undermining the immune system, and possibly leading to a variety of viruses, diseases, or death.

Chapter 2: Introduction

It all started in 1981 with a small correspondence published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Study, a journal of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) (MMWR). According to the communication, from October 1980 to May 1981, a group of five young, previously stable homosexual men were treated for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP).

Chapter 3: HIV/AIDS Basics

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a form of retrovirus that infects immune system cells in humans.

  • HIV type 1 (HIV-1)
  • HIV type 2 (HIV-2)

Chapter 4: HIV/AIDS Epidemiology—United States

According to the CDC, more than 1.2 million people in the United States are infected with HIV. One of every seven of these people is ignorant of the infection. Very many patients are detected too late in their infection's path.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • HIV/AIDS and Aging

Chapter 5: HIV/AIDS Epidemiology—Globally

Globally, HIV/AIDS is a major public health concern.

  • More than 30 million people have died of AIDS since 1981.
  • Approximately 8,000 people die every day of treatable AIDS-related disease.
  • Africa has more than 14 million AIDS orphans.

Chapter 6: Clinical Manifestation of HIV and AIDS

Many HIV-infected individuals are unaware that they are infected. They sometimes may not get sick right away until they develop a seroconversion, also known as "acute retroviral syndrome." They can develop a glandular fever-like illness with a fever, rash, joint pains, and swollen lymph nodes in this situation. Seroconversion normally occurs between 2 and 8 weeks of HIV infection.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Incubation Period

Chapter 7: HIV and Opportunistic Diseases

The following opportunistic infections (OIs) appear to cause morbidity and mortality in HIV-1 patients worldwide. With some patients, treatment with combined antiretroviral therapy decreases the occurrence of OIs, while for those who do not have access to health services, the effects of OIs are serious.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Oral Manifestations
  • Diagnostics & Treatment of Oral Manifestations
  • HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)
  • HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
  • Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and HIV
  • Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and HIV

Chapter 8: Methods of Transmission and Risk Behaviors Associated With HIV/AIDS

Risky HIV/AIDS activity is classified into three groups. Since the discovery of HIV, no significant developments in these modes of transmission have been reported. The number of diseases that may occur as a result of each path varies considerably across communities and countries.

Three common Methods of Transmission:

  • Sexual Transmission
  • Blood Transmission
  • Mother-to-Child (perinatal) Transmission

Chapter 9: Prevention Strategies

"Any action or attempt performed to minimize the risk of an unfavorable health incident or process beginning, continuing, or deteriorating" is described as prevention. Prevention activities target a variety of risk factors, such as personal, cultural, or situational features linked to particular health incidents. Effective preventive messages are directed to individual populations, and those who receive them are more likely to comply. Effective preventive messages are tailored to individual markets and their features.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Sexual Transmission Prevention Strategies
  • How To Use a Male Condom
  • How To Use a Female Condom
  • Blood Transmission Prevention Strategies
  • National and International Prevention Strategies

Chapter 10: Testing

When HIV testing was first made available in 1985, the primary aim was to monitor the blood stream. By 1987, the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) released recommendations that made HIV therapy and monitoring a priority as a prevention measure for those who were most likely to be affected or who engaged in high-risk activities.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Antibody Test
  • RNA Test
  • Other Body Fluid Tests
  • Further Assessment
  • Partner Counseling and Referral Services (PCRS)

Chapter 11: Current Recognized Methods of Treatment

When HIV testing was first made available in 1985, the primary aim was to monitor the blood stream. By 1987, the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) released recommendations that made HIV therapy and monitoring a priority as a prevention measure for those who were most likely to be affected or who engaged in high-risk activities.

Chapter 12: Effective HIV Management in the Workplace

When delivering first aid or health treatment, universal safeguards are a series of precautions intended to prevent the spread of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and other bloodborne pathogens. According to the CDC, all patients' blood and body fluids are considered highly infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens under universal safeguards.

Chapter 13: Professional, Ethical, and Legal Standards of Care

The successful treatment of HIV/AIDS patients necessitates integrity as well as adherence to ethical and legal quality of care.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Consent to Treat
  • Confidentiality
  • Americans With Disabilities Act

Chapter 14: The Effective Caregiver—Appropriate Attitudes and Behaviors Toward Those Infected With HIV

The willingness of healthcare practitioners to offer reliable, supportive treatment to clients with HIV, as well as their spouses and family members, is dependent on their attitudes and behaviors.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Cultural Sensitivity
  • Teaching
  • HIV Stigma and Discrimination

Chapter 15: Summary

HIV/AIDS has been with us for over 30 years. When this emerging illness was first "discovered," both the medical world and the general public were terrified. They didn't get it, and there were stigmas associated with its spread. Throughout it all, healthcare professionals were at the forefront of caring for HIV/AIDS patients and their families.

Lesson 7: Zoonoses: Can Your Pet Make You Sick?

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Define zoonoses.
  • Describe dermatophytes and types of animals most likely to transmit them.
  • Identify the four major categories of zoonoses as listed by the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • Describe the causes, signs, symptoms, treatments of salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, cat-scratch disease (CSD), leptospirosis, trematodosis, toxoplasmosis, rabies, avian influenza, dermatophytosis, and sporotrichosis.
  • Describe the role of animals in each of the zoonoses categories.
  • Identify common human diseases in which animals are not the source of transmission.
  • Identify diseases spread from humans to animals.
  • Explain methods of preventing zoonoses.

Animals are an integral part of many people's lives, offering vital social connections, moral comfort, and pleasure. Pets and other animals can contribute to a therapeutic atmosphere by providing companionship, assistance, sensory stimuli, the desire for activity, a feeling of peace, and a degree of acceptance that is also difficult to find elsewhere.

Chapter 2: Introduction

Many people consider their dogs to be members of their own. Animals are sometimes regarded as partners as a result of these special relationships. The human-animal relationship has been portrayed and praised in ancient literature, contemporary fiction, and scientific reports in scholarly journals. Animals have many health benefits to humans, whether through pet ownership or through rehabilitation or service services.

Chapter 3: Bacterial Zoonoses

Categories of Bacterial Zoonoses:

  • Salmonellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis
  • Cat-scratch disease (CSD)
  • Leptospirosis

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Salmonellosis
  • Campylobacteriosis

Chapter 4: Cat-Scratch Disease (CSD)

CSD, also known as cat scratch fever or subacute regional lymphadenitis, is a rare, self-limiting bacterial infection. It was first described in 1889 as a debilitating, regional lymphadenopathy caused by a cat scratch.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Leptospirosis

Chapter 5: Parasitic Zoonoses

Toxoplasmosis and trematodosis are examples of parasitic zoonoses.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Trematodosis
  • Chlonorchiasis
  • Fascioliasis
  • Opisthorchis

Chapter 6: Viral Zoonoses

Several diseases, including rabies and avian influenza, are included in the group of viral zoonoses, which are discussed in this section.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Rabies
  • Avian Influenza

Chapter 7: Fungal Zoonoses

Dermatophytoses and sporotrichosis are the most common fungal zoonoses.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Dermatophytes (Ringworm or Tinea)
  • Sporotrichosis

Chapter 8: Diseases in Which Animals Are Not the Source

Humans wrongly blame their pets for a variety of diseases or infestations. Head lice, pinworms, and Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci infections are examples of these. Healthcare providers often advise their customers to send their pets to a doctor for treatment, but these infections are transmitted by viruses that live and propagate in people, not their pets.

Chapter 9: Diseases Spread From Humans to Animals

Animals can contract diseases from humans, according to new research. Primates, for example, will contract polio and measles (Bender & Minicucci, 2007). Mycobacterium tuberculosis has also been found in dogs (and all have lived with a clinically ill human). MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) has been found in cats, dogs, goats, and pigs, indicating that MRSA is spreading.

Chapter 10: Methods of Preventing Human Infection

Educating pet owners is one of the most effective ways to deter zoonoses. Pregnant patients and immunocompromised people are more vulnerable to infection.

Chapter 11: Summary

Although many zoonoses are associated with wild animals, many can also be spread by domestic pets. However, the likelihood of transmission and severe infection remains minimal. Keeping a sterile, healing area entails avoiding infections that can be spread by pets and wildlife. Education and the use of reliable, efficient grooming practices are the keys to prevention, allowing humans to share more fun encounters with animals in a healthy manner.

Lesson 8: Tickborne Diseases

Chapter 1: Course Description

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain how ticks infect their host.
  • Identify how Lyme disease is spread.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease.
  • Discuss the methods for diagnosing and treating Lyme disease.
  • Describe other tickborne diseases found in the United States.
  • List ways to prevent tickborne diseases and properly remove a tick.

Ticks in the United States hold a wide range of viruses that can cause a host of human diseases. Lyme disorder is one of the most prevalent of these. Many tick-borne viruses are difficult to identify because their symptoms mimic those of other common illnesses. Tick-borne disease control entails avoiding tick-infested habitats, wearing protective footwear, and using mosquito repellents.

Chapter 2: Introduction

In the United States, there are many tick-borne diseases. Lyme disorder is the most well-known. However, over a dozen lesser-known tick-borne diseases have been reported in the United States, and about six tickborne diseases are present worldwide. This course focuses on tick-borne diseases in the United States, with a particular emphasis on the most well-known and prevalent.

Chapter 3: How Ticks Infect Their Hosts

Ticks are unable to fly or leap, so they must locate a host by settling on the tips of grasses and shrubs in a role known as "questing." Their lower legs grip the grass or trees, and their upper pairs of legs are outstretched, ready to leap onto a moving host. When the host brushes against the tick's resting place, the tick immediately climbs onto the host and searches for a place to bite the host to get its "blood meal."

Chapter 4: Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected deer tick (or blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus). The nymphal (immature) type of the tick is responsible for the majority of human cases. Adult ticks are about the size of a sesame seed, while nymphs are about the size of a poppy seed.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Incidence
  • How Is Lyme Disease Spread?
  • Signs and Symptoms
  • Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS)
  • Coinfections
  • Diagnosis and Treatment
  • Treatment
  • Vaccines

Chapter 5: Other Tickborne Diseases

Other common tick-borne diseases are summarized in the table below.

Chapter 6: Prevention of Tickborne Diseases

The most common way to avoid tick-borne diseases is to avoid tick habitats. In many regions and seasons, many ticks live in wooded, brushy, or grassy areas. Several care should be taken during outdoor activity to avoid ticks off the skin.

Chapter 7: Proper Removal of a Tick

  • To remove a tick, use a pointed (fine-tipped) tweezer. If you don’t have tweezers, put on gloves or cover your hands with tissue paper, and then use your fingers. Do not handle the tick with bare hands. Grab the tick's mouth parts close to the skin (the body will be above the skin), and slowly pull the tick straight out with steady outward pressure, until the tick lets go.
  • Do not grab the tick around its swollen belly or you could push infected fluid from the tick into your body.
  • Do not twist or jerk the tick because this can cause mouth parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth parts with tweezers.

Chapter 8: Summary

The effects of tick-borne diseases on an individual's health can vary from moderate to fatal. The symptoms will last for weeks or years and have a significant impact on any part of a person's life. Rapid and precise diagnosis, as well as successful therapies, are critical in deciding the outcome of these diseases.

Lesson 9: Emerging Global Infectious Diseases

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Lesson 1 - Infection Control Basics
Learn basic infection control procedures which are a vital part of health care and patient safety measures used by every member of the healthcare team both in the United States and globally.

Lesson 2 - Influenza: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention
Striking hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide every year, influenza can be prevented using a combination of techniques which you will learn in this course.

Lesson 3 - Pneumonia in Adults and Children
Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of the lungs. Globally, it is the leading killer of children under the age of 5 years. It is also common in the United States. There are several types of pneumonia, depending on the type of germ (bacteria, virus, or fungi) that causes it and you will learn to control and treat them in this course.

Lesson 4 - Tuberculosis
Despite advances in their treatment and prevention, tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB, or MDR-TB remain two of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. An ancient disease found in Egyptian mummies, TB and MDR-TB are increasingly difficult to treat, due, in part, to the emergence of drug-resistant strains of the disease and the resources necessary to fight the disease.

Lesson 5 - The ABCs of Hepatitis
All forms of hepatitis can have significant economic and social consequences since infected individuals can take weeks or months to recover and return to school, work, or their daily lives. Long-term consequences of the viruses vary but can include serious, chronic health consequences including cirrhosis and liver cancer. Prevention, early diagnosis, and effective treatment are essential in preventing the spread of these diseases.

Lesson 6 - HIV/AIDS Education for Health Care Professionals
Causing fear, guilt, and accusations, weakening the immune system and potentially leading to numerous infections, cancers, or death, HIV and AIDS remain international health issues. They require that health care providers be knowledgeable about the complex clinical aspects of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, as well as address ethical, cultural, and empowerment issues, and implement evolving infection control guidelines.

Lesson 7 - Zoonosis: Can Your Pet Make You Sick?
Pets and other animals can contribute to a healing environment with their companionship, assistance, sensory stimulation, need for exercise, sense of calmness, and level of acceptance that is often difficult to find from any other source. Yet many diseases can be spread from pets to people. These diseases, called zoonosis, can involve bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. People can also infect pets, as well. Maintaining a healing environment for all includes the prevention of infections from pets and other animals.

Lesson 8 - Tick-Borne Diseases
In the United States, ticks carry many different pathogens that can cause a variety of human diseases. One of the most common of these is Lyme disease. Many tickborne diseases are challenging to diagnose because their symptoms imitate other common illnesses. The prevention of tickborne disease involves avoidance of tick-infested areas, the appropriate use of proper clothing, and insect repellents.

Lesson 9 - Emerging Global Infectious Diseases
Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) present an ever-present threat to the health and livelihood of individuals, families, communities, and countries all over the world. The greatest burden of EIDs lies in developing countries and with infants and children who are the most vulnerable to these infections and the long-term consequences of their presence.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet.

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

1.  Who are Courses For Success?

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Our courses span across many categories including Academic, Animal, Beauty, Business, Career, Counseling, Creative & Media, Health & Therapy, Hobbies & Trades, IT, Personal Development, Sports & Fitness.

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Online learning is easy, if not easier than a traditional academic situation. By studying an online course, the usual boundaries caused by location and time constraints are eliminated, meaning you are free to study where and when you want at your own pace. Of course, you will need to be able to self-manage your time and be organized, but with our help, you’ll soon find yourself settling into a comfortable rhythm of study.

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Course Summary

Course ID: 007IDAICSP
Delivery Mode: Online
Access: 6 Weeks
Tutor Support: Yes
Time: Study at your own pace
Duration: 13 Hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

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