Ultimate Understanding Adolescents Online Bundle, 10 Certificate Courses

The Most Comprehensive Understanding Adolescents Bundle


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Get Understanding Adolescents, Enhancing Language Development in Childhood, Guided Reading and Writing, Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom, Content Literacy: Grades 6-12, Differentiating K-12 Assessments, Teaching Smarter With SMART Boards, Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6, Teaching Writing: Grades K-3 and Speed Reading: Merrill Ream in this Bundle

1. Understanding Adolescents: Learn about understanding adolescents

Learn About the Many Physical, Emotional, and Cognitive Changes that Affect Teens
Yesterday, she was a sweet young girl. Today, you swear aliens have abducted her and put an evil twin in her place.

To know your kids is to love them. In this course, an experienced social worker will help you gain a deep understanding and appreciation of your adolescent's development and behavior. You'll uncover the secrets of the adolescent mind and gain valuable information on how they think, how they feel, and how their identities develop.

Parents, family members, child and youth workers, counselors and the like will all benefit from the information shared in this course.

You'll learn about the many physical, emotional, and cognitive changes that affect the teens in your life, and you'll understand the significance of these changes both for you and the adolescent. You'll look into relationships both in and outside of the home and the development of a teen's identity. You'll explore personality, moral development and the role of faith.

Finally, you'll gain an understanding as to how teens are affected by stress, including common defense mechanisms, coping techniques, and common mental health issues.

By the time you finish this Certificate in Understanding Adolescents Online Course, you should be very well-prepared to understand, appreciate, and meet the needs of the teens in your life.

2. Enhancing Language Development in Childhood: Learn about enhancing language development in childhood

Learn How to Enhance Language Development in Children
Follow your child's lead and have fun while enhancing language development!
In this fun and user-friendly course for parents, teachers, and caregivers, you will discover how children learn to process language and how they become proficient speakers and thinkers. This Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course will help you enrich your child's life by stimulating his or her continued speech, brain, and language development in an enjoyable, age-appropriate, and natural way.

3. Guided Reading and Writing: Learn about guided reading and writing

Learn How to Guide Your Students to Reading and Writing
Get the professional development training you need to improve student literacy as an accomplished teacher shares the secrets of turning guided reading strategies into opportunities for teaching writing. The road to literacy is also the road to ingenuity, invention, and imagination, and you'll soon learn how to take your students from groans to grins with creative lesson plans that really work!

We'll start our journey by talking about the reasons reading and writing are so difficult for students. Then we'll meet the total literacy framework and see how it mitigates literacy problems once and for all. Since this framework is based on guided reading lessons that flow naturally into writing challenges, you'll learn the recipe for a successful guided reading into writing lesson.

Once the framework is in place, we'll investigate a number of ways to modify this basic recipe for a variety of K-12 circumstances, wrapping up with a look at good writing habits and the traits of a productive writing conference. If you're looking for the right way to get students excited about the power of literacy, this Certificate in Guided Reading and Writing Online Course is for you!

4. Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom: Learn about Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom

Teach Reading in Enjoyable Way
Differentiated instruction tactics will help you understand how your students learn so you can teach in a way that makes sense to them. When you apply those tactics within the guided reading framework, which helps you lead students through new ways of approaching text, great things start to happen. The result is a classroom full of students who are able to negotiate increasingly challenging texts with unprecedented fluency.

This Certificate in Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom Online Course is critical for today's educators, who often have to teach on the run with limited resources and unlimited demands on their time. Get ready to reach your readers with ease in no time flat!

5.Content Literacy: Grades 6-12: Discover literacy development strategies that will make content come alive for each and every student!

Learn How to Develop Literacy Skills
Students must develop literacy skills in order to access, learn, and comprehend. And with the adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), teachers in all subject areas—science, humanities, history, social sciences, mathematics, and technology—are finding themselves actively involved in their students' literacy development, including skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. In this course, you'll discover literacy development strategies that will make content come alive for each and every student.

We'll review the new literacy standards to see how they relate to the content areas, and uncover the many ways adolescent development is connected to effective teaching. We'll explore differentiated education and see how easy it can be to deliver content to students at varying levels of literacy development. You'll also see how student learning centers can provide a valuable, real-world model of how content learning and literacy skill development can happen simultaneously in every classroom.

In addition, you'll analyze your current teaching practices to identify the effective literacy development that you're already doing. We'll work together to adapt some of your favorite lessons to enhance reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language development. By the end of the course, you'll be confident in your ability to utilize the best of what's new, keep the best of what you've already got, and enjoy being a great 21st-century teacher!

6. Differentiating K-12 Assessments: Assessment is the key to helping every student succeed!

Start Now To Learn Differentiating K-12 Assessments
Differentiated assessment is the key to helping every student succeed—and no matter what grade you're teaching, this course will give you the tools you need to gather your assessment data quickly and easily.

You'll begin by exploring strategies for performing pre-assessments, formative (ongoing) assessments, and summative assessments. Next, you'll discover how to identify and share learning goals, gather assessment information, adjust your instruction, and provide feedback to your students. Real-life examples will help you see how differentiated assessment provides direction for improvement, promotes confidence, and motivates your learners to do their best.

Whether you're a new or experienced teacher, you'll gain skill and confidence as you get hands-on practice in using a wide range of assessment techniques. By the time you've completed these lessons, you'll have a clear roadmap for differentiating your assessments and a wealth of practical ideas you can start using in your classroom right away.

7. Teaching Smarter With SMART Boards: Revolutionize Today's Classroom

Use SMART Boards to Engage Learners
SMART Boards are revolutionizing today's classroom. Using these exciting interactive whiteboards, you can create multimedia lessons that engage learners and address their diverse needs.

But having SMART Boards in the classroom and knowing how to use them to provide quality instruction are two different things! If you have a Smart Board in your classroom but have little training in using it, you may be wondering—"What on earth do I do with it?"

In this class, you'll discover how to create outstanding presentations with SMART Board and SMART Notebook technology. You'll explore the basics of using these tools and discover how to create your own SMART board lessons blending text, videos, and graphics. You'll also go beyond the bells and whistles and look at specific ways to use SMART technology to broaden your content and make your lessons accessible to all students. Finally, you'll get some simple trouble-shooting tips that will come in handy if your SMART board isn't acting as smart as it should.

By the time you're done with this course, you'll be an expert at using your new high-tech tools to plan SMART board lessons that provide engaging, thought-provoking, and easy-to-update material for today's media-savvy learners.

8. Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6: Master Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6

Learn Different Teaching Techniques in Writing Grades 4-6
In this Certificate in Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6 Online Course, you'll learn from an experienced educator how to motivate and assist developing writers. We'll begin with an overview of the writing basics, focusing on the importance of the task, audience, and purpose. Then we'll delve into how to organize your materials to create an inviting writing environment.

We'll discuss each step of teaching writing and the strategies you can use with your students. You'll also work on strengthening your students' writing using technology. Along the way, you'll develop engaging lessons for literary response, narrative writing, expository writing, and persuasive writing. We'll look at the characteristics of each type of writing, and you'll get practical suggestions for teaching them to your class.

Two writing approaches we'll cover, 6+1 Trait Writing and Writer's Workshop, will enable you to put everything you learn in this course into a workable format. You'll also discover the secrets of effective writing assessment as you learn about evaluation tools like portfolios and rubrics.

9. Teaching Writing: Grades K-3: Practical ideas to motivate students in your classroom!

Start Now To Learn Teaching Writing: Grades K-3
From the time that a young child picks up a crayon and makes marks on a paper to when an older child puts the finishing sentence on an autobiography or a poem, a young author is developing the skills that will be used for a lifetime. In this course, you'll examine the developmental stages of writing, from scribbling to the standard spelling stage, so that you can foster your students' skills and gently nudge them to grow as authors. This course is full of practical ideas that you can use to motivate students in your classroom.

You'll look at tools such as the writer's workshop, the six traits of writing, and genre studies for ways to teach students about writing. You'll see how each of these tools can be used by teachers to encourage early elementary writers. As your students become better writers, they will become better readers, and you'll see how well reading and writing instruction work together to support each other.

The course also covers ways to support the writers who struggle, whether due to a lack of motivation, fine motor skills, or ideas. And of course, you'll explore techniques for getting parents involved so that they can help with writing at home. By the end of the course, you'll have a new enthusiasm for teaching that will ignite your students' love of writing!

10. Speed Reading: Merrill Ream: Learn about Speed Reading: Merrill Ream

Learn The Skills and Techniques in Speed Reading and Profiency
Taught by acclaimed speed reading expert Dr. Merrill Ream, this Certificate in Speed Reading: Merrill Ream Online Course is a complete speed reading experience. Topics are presented in a logical progression with plenty of time to help you master the skills and techniques you'll need for lasting proficiency as a speed reader.

For comprehensive information on units of study click the units of study tab above.

This is an incredible opportunity to invest in yourself and your future, sharpen your training skills and learn what it takes to create your own success with Courses For Success Today!

Course Fast Facts:

  1. This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  2. Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  3. You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  4. You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  5. You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete each course receive a certificate of completion per course, with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

The Understanding Adolescents 10 Course Bundle includes the following courses, below is a summary of each course: 

Course 1 - Certificate in Understanding Adolescents Online Course

Introduction

In our first lesson, I'll explain the term adolescent development and familiarize you with some terminology. I'll also provide you with an overview of the three main stages of adolescence to help you become familiar with the tasks and milestones inherent in each stage.

Biological Development

Adolescence is a time of change. These changes occur on the outside as well as on the inside. For this lesson, we’re going to focus on some external changes, and one of the things we'll look at is puberty, the impact it can have on the adolescent, as well as how these changes can affect how you treat an adolescent.

Cognitive Development

In this lesson, we'll start looking at some of the internal changes kids experience during adolescence. As children's bodies take huge leaps forward, so do their brains as they learn and discover new ways of thinking and reasoning. This is cognitive development, which means how someone thinks, and that'll be our focus for this lesson.

Social Development I

The dreaded peer group. During today's lesson, we’ll take a close look at socialization, peers and peer groups, friends, intimacy, and social changes in your adolescent's behavior.

Social Development II

One of the things that changes most during adolescence is a child's family relationships and how family members interact with each other. In this lesson, we'll take a look at some of those changes and the impact this may have on both the adolescent and the family.

Emotional Development

Emotional development is one of the internal changes that evolves during adolescence. During today's lesson we’ll take a look at some aspects of emotions and their development, and the significance this may have for adolescent development.

Identity and Self-Concept

This is the “Who Am I?” lesson. Today, we'll explore how we think about ourselves, how our identity develops, what might influence our identity, and our self-concept.

Moral Development and Faith

Today's lesson is all about moral development and faith separate from religion. We'll look at how the changes to the adolescent play a role in their moral development. You'll become familiar with the overall thoughts, ideas and processes that seem common to adolescent moral development.

Stress

In this lesson, we're going to take a close look at stress, anxiety, frustration, and defense mechanisms. We'll explore how these things affect all of us and how some of this is demonstrated during adolescence.

Influences on Development

For this lesson, we'll adopt a slightly different format. Today, we'll look at four separate things: nature versus nurture, temperament, personality, and resiliency. The main thread carried throughout this lesson is how a better understanding of ourselves can help us to better understand others.

Adolescent Needs

Similar to the last lesson, today we'll look at a few more distinct topics. First we'll review some of the adolescent needs that we've discussed prior to this lesson, then we'll discuss chronic illness, gay and lesbian youth and the issues these individuals may be faced with, and finally a chapter highlighting parenting the adolescent.

When Something Goes Wrong

For our last lesson, we're going to stray from the normal to the abnormal part of adolescent development. The focus of this lesson will be a brief overview of disorders or conditions that are consistently viewed within the adolescent population.

Course 2 - Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course

Introduction

How do children learn language? Play! And not with flash cards, or anything else that you can buy. Children are born with a complete package of language-learning tools. The only accessory they need is you, helping them unlock their natural instincts for language. After reading this first section, you'll be using play and instinct to communicate soundlessly with a newborn, to help him fill his language-building toolbox, and to create a stimulating environment for language development.

First Play: Sounds & Signs

Imagine a database of sounds in your child’s brain. Where do these sounds come from? How does she file, sort, and choose to use these sounds to communicate? In today's lesson, we'll look at why her mind is made for these remarkable tasks, and you'll learn straightforward ways you can lend a hand (even in the form of sign language!). This lesson also includes a fascinating overview of brain and mouth anatomy.

Mama and Other First Real Words
You say, “Shelly just said, ‘ball’!” But your friend says, “Nah, that was just babbling.” Who's right? Does something count as a real word if it isn’t pronounced perfectly? In this lesson, we'll explore what makes a word real and how to interpret your child’s patterns of simplifying early language. You'll also start using a journal to uncover the rich potential in your child’s one- and two-word phrases.

Understanding Before Speaking

Once you understand the mechanics of hearing and understanding, your role in encouraging language can be powerful, simple, and fun! Many caregivers ask at this stage when they should start to worry about language delays. In today's lesson, we'll soothe your concerns by discussing what to watch for, when to seek assistance (and from which type of specialist), and when to stop worrying and keep playing! We'll look through a list of typical first words that you can use to trace your child’s communication explosion.

Watching & Playing
Can you guess when a baby’s brain grows the most? How do you facilitate this growth? Again, the answer is play! In this lesson, we'll match favorite infant-caregiver games to the neurological functions they stimulate. You'll also learn how language affects the development of thinking skills, just as the function of thinking affects language development. Today we'll explore how to keep this circle of growth cycling.

Adding Pieces to Phrases

Your kiddo is talking, but you’re not done yet! Although two-word phrases, such as “get ball” certainly communicate an idea, your child will keep refining his sentences as he grows. Today you'll find out how to help him progress to past tense, contractions, pronouns, and conjunctions. You'll also learn about the fascinating thought processes behind questions. Don’t forget your journal!

Be A Natural Model
Wow–now we have listening, speaking, sounds, words, and sentences. What more is there? Lots! Is it still fun? Does she still need you? Of course! In today's lesson, we'll continue with a few more do's and don'ts for caregivers, emphasizing our favorite learning tool: games!

Making the Tongue Take Off

Expanding on our earlier anatomy lesson, today you'll learn how sounds depend on strong, agile mouth muscles. Before you start thinking about tongue push-ups, remember we always focus on maximizing the opportunities within natural interactions. A discussion of feeding—including your choices of bottles, cups, and straws—is key. We'll answer complex and controversial questions about pacifiers, sippy cups, and thumb sucking, and I'll provide some great tips for easing necessary transitions.

Playing With Sounds
Some sounds sound fun (like boing!), and some sounds feel fun (like zzzzzz). What does this kind of fun teach if it doesn't use precise words? In today's lesson, you'll find out what you're teaching when you encourage your little one to play with sounds. You'll also learn which speech games will help you make the connection from speech to reading.

Talking More

Now you know that speech, language, and communication are different, but related, topics. Using your knowledge of how sounds make language, in this lesson, you'll learn how language is used to communicate and connect with others. We call this social use of language. Today you'll learn how to help your talker become a conversationalist!

Appreciating Differences
Although children follow similar development processes, no two walk the same path. As more is discovered about learning, the lines between different, delayed, and disability grow foggier. Demystifying these terms is easier when you learn about different learning styles, and when you understand the styles used by you and your child. While you can’t eavesdrop on your child’s thoughts, what you learn in today's lesson will help you help her connect her learning style and her use of language.

A Word About Literature

Teaching a child the alphabet tends to be our first step toward reading, but is it where literacy begins? While this skill can be gratifying for adults to see, literacy begins in the brain and is nurtured with fun and games. As you've learned about language skills, literacy doesn’t come in a box from the store. When you understand instincts and use them in fun and play, they come from you.

Course 3 - Certificate in Guided Reading and Writing Online Course

Why Is It So Hard to Read and Write?
Have you ever wondered why so many of your students struggle to read and write? You're not alone! In this introductory lesson, we'll discuss why these two subjects are so hard for students and how we can make their lives a little easier. Get ready for some creative suggestions that you can read about today and use in the classroom tomorrow.

The Total Literacy Framework

In order to really help our struggling readers and writers, we need a framework for implementing positive change. The total literacy framework is just the thing: Guided reading, writing, engagement, and assessment are the components that make it so effective. The best part is that this framework allows us a lot of flexibility and opportunities for success as we meet diverse learner needs. We'll discuss guided reading, writing, and engagement in today's lesson and look at assessment next time.

Where Does Assessment Fit In?

Assessment is the part of the total literacy framework that drives instruction. After all, we need to know where students are academically and where they need to go before we can teach them effectively. So in today's lesson, let's take a look at fun and simple ways to assess students' reading and writing skills without taking up too much class time.

Recipe for a Guided Reading and Writing Lesson

Since a lot of our course is going to focus on turning guided reading lessons into writing opportunities within the total literacy framework, we need to begin with a basic guided reading and writing recipe. The recipe we'll go over in this lesson is one that you can easily modify for any K-12 setting, and it's dotted with examples from real classrooms where guided reading and writing are changing lives.

Writing Stories

Have you ever read a great story only to think, "I could write something better than that"? Well, guess what? Your students think the exact same thing. Why not give them an opportunity to write stories after reading great books during guided reading time? You'll learn all the tricks in this action-packed lesson.

Composing Nonfiction

Nonfiction is often thought of as the ugly stepsister to its more creative counterpart, fiction. However, with a little imagination, you can make nonfiction come alive in your classroom. And even better, you can help your students write compelling articles after they read nonfiction. In this lesson, you'll learn how you can make fiction's stepsister a little less ugly.

Writing Poetry

Some students absolutely hate reading and writing poetry, but they won't after you introduce the techniques we're going to discuss today! If you're eager to bring out the natural poet in your budding writers, this lesson will give you just the creative jumpstart you've been waiting for. As an added bonus, you'll take a tour of the different kinds of poetry that inspire students.

Developing Papers

Writing papers is never going to be the most interesting part of school, but it's always going to be necessary. So in this lesson, we'll discuss how to teach students to read research material and use it as a launch pad for papers that are clear and thought-provoking the first time around. We'll even discuss some techniques that make the whole process a little more enjoyable.

Crafting Ideas Across the Content Areas

One of the neat things about employing the total literacy framework is that we can extend it across the content areas. In today's lesson, you'll learn how to use guided reading and writing to your advantage whether you're teaching math, social studies, or science. The best part is that your students will learn that reading and writing are never isolated endeavors!

Reinforcing Good Writing Habits
Have you ever written something that was a little hard to understand? Even the best writers can find themselves struggling to make their point as clear as possible. So in this lesson, we'll go over how to teach students to craft their own style, hone their organization, and check for proper mechanics before they turn in any assignments.

Holding Writing Conferences
Writing conferences are a great chance to make sure students are successful as they turn reading into writing and writing into ideas. I'm always surprised at how much I can accomplish by taking only a few minutes a week to discuss a student's writing. In this lesson, we'll discuss the power of conferences and how to make the most of them.

Turning Small Successes Into Big Rewards
As we're building the total literacy framework in our classrooms, it's important to take time to encourage and inspire students by turning their small successes into big rewards. If you're looking for new strategies to motivate students and make reading and writing fun, you won't want to miss all the tips and tricks in this final lesson!

Course 4 - Certificate in Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom Online Course

Building a Balanced Library Framework
Have you ever wished you had a good way to reach your struggling readers? If so, you're probably ready to discover the secret that thousands of teachers are already using to transform their reading instruction: differentiated instruction combined with guided reading. We'll take our first look at it in this lesson, and I'll explain how blending these techniques will help you build a balanced literary framework that helps your students negotiate a variety of texts with success.

Getting to Know Your Readers
The first step in helping your students is getting to know who they are and how their minds work. In this lesson, you'll learn how to evaluate your students' readiness, interests, learning profiles, and social elements. Then you can use this information to drive meaningful, focused instruction that will help them see reading as a pleasure rather than a chore.

Planning Assessments
Assessment is at the heart of differentiated instruction because you have to know where your students are before you take them somewhere new. In today's lesson, learn how to plan quality pre-, ongoing, and summative assessments that will give you a clear picture of student learning. The best part of assessing students at multiple intervals is that you can tell what is working and what isn't, adjusting teaching strategies as you go.

Grouping Students
In this lesson, we'll discuss flexible groups, which are a mainstay in the differentiated classroom because they allow you to combine students for different reasons on different days. Sometimes you'll combine students based on interests and other times based on readiness or learning profile. However you use flexible groups, you'll appreciate the way this technique lets you accommodate a diversity of students.

Selecting Texts
When it comes to selecting the texts you'll teach, there are literally thousands of options. However, you can narrow them down considerably by understanding the criteria of good fiction and nonfiction texts. You'll be picking the right texts the first time after we finish this lesson.

Framing Your Before Reading
Did you know that a lot of the learning process hinges on what you do to prepare students before they actually start reading? That's what we'll discuss in this lesson. It's easy to just introduce a text and let students have at it, but if you plan the time before reading with activities that build anticipation and ground the text in prior learning, you'll be amazed by the results.

Reading the Text
How students read a text is a highly personal matter, but in the classroom, you have to direct reading to get the greatest results. In this lesson, you'll learn how to teach students the right way to read, to comprehend what they've just read, and to make inferences. The ultimate goal is helping your students have truly meaningful interactions with the text, and I've got just the tricks to help you through.

Navigating the After Reading Framework
Does learning end when students put a book down? I hope not! The time to really help students process the text and extend their learning in new avenues is after students finish reading and have the chance to start thinking for themselves. Today, we'll go over the after-reading framework, where you'll teach students to turn information into ideas as they go beyond the text and into the world.

Tiering With Ease
If you think of your classroom as a ladder, you'll realize that you have a lot of students on a lot of different rungs. In today's lesson, we'll explore tiering, which is a concept that helps you separate students based on their readiness, interests, or learning profiles. The trick is doing so without making students feel like they're more or less competent than others. Are you eager for the secrets? You'll master them in no time!

Anchoring Your Students to Extra Learning
What do you do with those extra 10 or 15 minutes at the end of a lesson or a school day? An increasingly popular idea is to anchor your students to the material they've learned by extending learning in new avenues. You can do this with games, writing prompts, or any number of other fun, creative activities. We'll explore lots of great ideas in today's lesson.

Crafting Independent Reading Projects
Your ultimate goal with the balanced literary framework is to create independent readers who are confident and capable of negotiating new texts with ease. In this lesson, you'll learn the basics of curriculum compacting, learning contracts, and individual projects, strategies to help your students transition to independence. You'll be amazed by how well students learn when they work more independently.

Putting the Puzzle Together
We'll finish up the course in this lesson by discussing the foundation that you build for classroom learning. Your attitude is everything. (That almost bears repeating!) Beyond that, you need to be able to encourage struggling readers and help parents extend the learning at home. Once your foundation is strong, you'll notice that both students and parents take the initiative to build positive reading experiences.

Course 5 - Certificate in Content Literacy: Grades 6-12 Online Course

Fundamentals of Adolescent Literacy
In our first lesson, we'll examine the difference between literacy and literature, and we'll look closely at the adolescent brain and find out how learning during that life stage is different than learning as a baby, child, or adult. You'll get a quick refresher on the concept of learning styles and discover how we can accommodate a diverse group of learners in a classroom. By the time the lesson is over, you'll be ready to explore the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and see how they address the need for grades 6-12 interdisciplinary literacy.

CCSS and Interdisciplinary Literacy
Today we'll explore the history and goals of the CCSS. You'll find out how the developers of the CCSS structured the standards to help prepare students for the 21st century workplace, and you'll see how interdisciplinary literacy fits into the standards. We'll walk through the document together and examine its parts. And finally, we'll discuss how you might use it when you prepare classroom activities.

Text Complexity
We know that students need to read more, and they need to read more complex texts. How would you explain what text complexity is? Today, we'll discuss the three aspects of text complexity as described in the CCSS. And by the end of the lesson, you'll see how you can use text complexity analysis in your content area classroom to help students develop their reading skills and more readily master your academic material.

Reading Strategies That Build Comprehension in the Content Areas
In this lesson, we'll take an in-depth look at the CCSS reading standards. First, we'll examine the reading anchor standards and see how they're articulated for different grade levels as students read both literature and informational texts. Then, we'll discuss practical examples of reading strategies that you can use in your own content area classroom. By the end of this lesson, you'll have a clear picture of how to use reading strategies to build comprehension in your content area.

Writing Strategies That Build Comprehension in the Content Areas
Today we'll explore the writing standards and see how the CCSS articulates them for different grade levels. We'll look at some practical writing strategies that are ideally suited for the content area classroom, and then we'll pop by Ms. X Ample's classroom to see one of those strategies in practice. We'll also examine some of the most common tricks of the trade among English Language Arts teachers, and you'll see how you can apply them to your classroom. After seeing what writing strategies look like in practice, you'll be inspired to try them yourself!

Speaking and Listening in the Content Areas
Don't assume your students have mastered their speaking and listening skills. Today we'll explore the Common Core State Standards for speaking and listening. You'll examine how the broad goals of the anchor standards are articulated for the 6-12 grade levels, and we'll take a close look at some speaking and listening activities that are ideally suited for the content area classroom. Along the way, we'll go over a few techniques for maintaining control in a conversational classroom.

Argumentation as Literacy Development
Most teenagers enjoy a good debate. There's nothing inherently wrong with this. In fact, we've all seen a well-argued debate lead to some pretty exciting outcomes. So let's take a close look at how argumentation is related to literacy and learn ways to reinforce and encourage the value of debate in your content area classroom.

Developing Academic Language in the Content Areas
Language is the basic building block of any society. It's how we communicate, and it's how we record events. In this lesson, we'll examine the CCSS goals for language development, and you'll learn how to help students achieve these goals in your own classroom.

Technology and Literacy
Technology has significantly changed the way we teach. Today's lesson is all about integrating the CCSS technology standards into the content area classroom. You'll discover how content learning, classroom technology, and literacy development complement each other and can occur simultaneously. Worried you're not an IT person and don't have the technological skills to succeed? Don't be. We'll address that, too, and by the end of this lesson, you'll be ready to roll up your sleeves and dive headfirst into the technology deep end!

Student Learning Centers
Student learning centers are a valuable, real-world model of how content learning and literacy skill development can happen simultaneously in every classroom. In this lesson, you'll learn how to repurpose existing lesson activities as learning center activities, and you'll find out why this approach to working with students in the upper grades is a practical way to integrate literacy development and content learning.

Assessment: How Will I Know It's Working?
In today's lesson, you'll find out how content literacy affects formative assessments and summative assessments. You'll learn what formative assessment is and isn't, and you'll learn the three steps to a well-implemented formative assessment. We'll also look at how Ms. X Ample incorporates this type of assessment into her instruction. We'll discuss the five building blocks of formative assessment, and you'll learn some simple strategies you can use in your classroom. We'll also take a close look at summative assessments, and you'll find out about the two new assessment consortia that will administer standardizedtests: Smarter
Literacy Evolution in the Classroom
In our final lesson for this course, we'll make a plan to use the best of what's new, keep the best of what you've already got, and enjoy being a great 21st century teacher. We'll wrap up everything you've learned throughout this course, and we'll examine tools you can use to integrate the CCSS with your existing lesson plans and your school's curriculum.

Course 6 - Certificate in Differentiating K-12 Assessments Online Course

What Is Differentiated Assessment?

In your first lesson, you'll meet your instructor and find out how differentiating assessment means more than just increasing our students' end-of-year test scores. We'll start by looking at the four main principles behind differentiated assessment (DA). You'll get a taste of how DA works in a real classroom, and you'll see a powerful example of what this approach can do for students. You'll also receive some hands-on strategies for beginning to use DA in your own classroom. Your first step will be getting to know your students' multiple intelligences, learning styles, social and emotional factors, and personal interests, so you can meet them where they are and begin the process of increasing achievement.

Types of Assessment

In Lesson 2, you'll get an overview of the three different types of assessment: The pre-assessment helps us gauge what students already know. The formative assessment is what we use to monitor and adjust instruction while we're teaching. Finally, we give a summative assessment (traditionally a quiz, test, or project) to summarize learning to a point and assign grades. We'll also talk about ways to keep students who have already mastered the content engaged in learning through anchor activities

Identifying and Sharing Learning Goals

In this lesson, we'll focus on the first principle of DA: indentifying and sharing learning goals with students. We'll start by deconstructing content standards into student-friendly language to tell students what they need to know, understand, and do. This information goes into the KUD chart. We'll also investigate how the KUD chart becomes a checklist to differentiate instruction and a template for designing both pre- and summative assessments. Finally, we'll talk about how to share learning goals with students in ways that motivate them and make our expectations clear.

Completing the Assessment Puzzle

In Lesson 4, we'll look at the last three principles of DA: gathering evidence of understanding, adjusting instruction, and giving feedback to students. We'll start by seeing how you can use a versatile activity in different ways as a formative assessment, and then we'll explore how to use the information you gain from the assessment to adjust instruction. Specifically, you'll see examples of re-teaching in a different way and tiering instruction (adding more complex and less complex activities to accommodate students at different readiness levels). We'll also learn some tactics you can use to give students constructive, descriptive feedback.

Motivating Unmotivated Learners

Have you ever had a student who just didn't seem interested in learning? Today, we'll look at assessment strategies you can use to motivate the unmotivated learners in your classroom. You'll see how something as simple as a remote control can increase attention because it speaks students' digital language. We'll also explore how you can use seating arrangements and open-ended questions to encourage students to participate in classroom discussions. Finally, we'll investigate how you can use the jigsaw strategy to support or challenge learners in the classroom.

Inspiring "Average" Students

Do you have a Mediocre Melanie in your classroom? This student is satisfied with doing only what it takes to get by. She shows up, completes assignments, rarely asks questions, and simply takes up space in the classroom. Today, we'll see how one teacher uses an anticipation guide, the Question-Answer-Relationship strategy, and a visual display to promote learning in students previously satisfied with maintaining the status quo.

Challenging "Gifted" Students

Today, you'll meet Accelerated Alex. He seems to always be one step ahead of other students in the class, so it can be challenging to keep him interested. You'll see how you can use learning contracts and Think-Tac-Toe lessons to challenge him without being weighed down with grading all these individual assignments.

Supporting Struggling Students

In Lesson 8, we'll explore strategies to support students who are struggling to learn information without putting so much stress on them that they shut down. We'll talk about using snowball fights and every-pupil response strategies. You'll also see how you can divide students into groups according to the assessment information you collect from these strategies. This will give you more time to spend with struggling students while keeping the students who are getting it learning and engaged.

Increase Vocabulary, Increase Achievement

Assessing vocabulary doesn't have to be boring. In Lesson 9, you'll learn about engaging vocabulary assessment strategies you can use in your classroom. After all, the stronger students' vocabulary is, the better chance they will have of answering end-of-the-year assessment questions correctly. We'll investigate how the ABC Brainstorm, Most Important Words, What's My Name?, Find My Family, and List-Cluster-Title-Explain strategies bring vocabulary to life while fostering independence and transferring ownership of learning to your students at the same time.

Making the Grade

In Lesson 10, we'll take a look at something that's always a hot topic in the teaching world: grading. If you've ever felt lost while contemplating your grade book, this lesson is for you! You'll get advice to help you grade students against standards, not against each other. How do we really grade assignments? You might be surprised by an exercise that reveals how many of our expectations are implied. We'll look at how to use rubrics effectively to expose these implied expectations, and we'll finish by exploring some common grading practices to avoid. By the end of this lesson, you'll have the framework you need to assign grades with confidence.

Saving Time With DA

As we've been exploring DA ideas throughout this course, have you been thinking to yourself, "How will I ever fit all these extra tasks into my day?" You might be surprised at how little time you need (and how DA can actually save you time)! In today's lesson, we'll investigate how to find time to implement and document assessment practices. You'll see how one teacher uses Quick Check forms to quickly document the mastery levels for each student. We'll explore time-saving techniques to keep bulletin boards updated, and we'll talk about how an assessment menu helps with lesson planning. Finally, you'll learn three new formative assessment strategies that you can use with your students: Four Corners, Muddiest Point, and Lesson Summary. You'll be on the road to saving time in no time!

Road Map for Success

In Lesson 12, we'll bring your DA training full-circle as we look at how to cope with challenges, avoid burnout, and create a road map for successful implementation. This survival guide for busy teachers also includes some of my favorite management tips to streamline grading and choose what to selectively abandon. You'll learn how to transfer your new skills to the real world and see how the skills you've picked up can actually make your life easier while raising achievement at the same time.

Course 7 - Certificate in Teaching Smarter With SMART Boards Online Course

SMART Boards: More Than a Giant Whiteboard
We'll begin this first lesson by taking a close look at exactly what a SMART Board is and focusing on its interactivity potential. What often happens in the classroom is that teachers inherit a SMART Board but don't know what to do with it. As far as they can tell, it's not much more than a whiteboard. So that's what we'll focus on in this lesson: the SMART Board's interactivity potential and its myriad possibilities. At the end of this lesson, you'll be excited and eager to learn more.

Learners Today
As teachers, we cannot turn our backs on technology. Our students have grown up with it. When we look at today’s learners, we have to look at the whole picture, and that includes where they are with current technology. So, in this lesson, we'll talk about some of the more recent learning theories and where technology fits in with them. We’ll go over the different learning types, multiple intelligences, differentiated instruction, and constructivism. We’ll take each theory and see how technology can complement them all. Along the way, I’ll also share with you the difference between digital natives and digital immigrants, an understanding that could help you greatly in your approach to teaching.

Getting Started
Our goal for this lesson is to download the SMART Notebook software and install it on your computer. Once you have the software downloaded and installed, we'll talk about the equipment you'll need to get started. Then we'll cover how to connect your SMART Board to your computer and projector. When we finish with all those technical details, we can start taking a tour of the SMART Board and the SMART Notebook software. By the end of this lesson, you'll be well prepared to begin working with your SMART Board and the SMART Notebook software. Please keep in mind that you do not have to have a Smart Board to complete the work for this class. The SMART Notebook software is the only requirement. The software is the magic with the Smart Board, not the board itself. So, even if you are exploring the idea of using Smart Boards, you can use your computer and create amazing lessons to use later when you actually have a board.

How to Insert Words and Objects Onto Your SMART Board
In this lesson, we'll focus on how to write on the SMART Board, beginning with how to type on it. Then we'll talk about how to write using the collection of pens, how to make shapes, and how to use the eraser. Along the way, I'll share some examples to help illustrate how you can use each of these tools. My goal is to inspire you with some great ideas that you can incorporate into your own classroom.

Capture Tools and Tables
In this lesson, we're going to look at ways to make use of documents you already have. There are a couple of terrific tools to help you do just that: Smart Ink and Capture. Another tool you'll undoubtedly use often is the Table tool. I'm sure you use tables and charts all the time as a teaching tool. The SMART Notebook Table tool makes creating and manipulating tables super easy. And with its other cool features—like being able to cover individual cells until you're ready to reveal them—I'm betting you'll use Table the tool often. Learning how to use these tools will take you another step closer to SMART Board mastery.

The Gallery
In today’s lesson, we’ll focus on the SMART Board Gallery. In the Gallery, you’ll find manipulatives, clip art, images, and more to help you teach every subject area. You can even add your own images to the Gallery to tailor your lessons to your own wishes. We'll also explore two valuable components of the Gallery: Gallery Essentials and My Content. We’ll take an in-depth look at each of these tools so that you’ll be comfortable using them to create highly visual, interactive lessons that will engage and involve your students.

Lesson Activity Toolkit
In this lesson, we'll be digging into the Lesson Activity Toolkit to see what's there and how it can help you with your classroom instruction. With a simple drag and type, you can introduce, review, or enrich learning. We'll also spend some time working with the Page Sorter, Attachments tab, and Activity Builder tab. The Page Sorter is instrumental in helping you see where you are in your SMART Notebook file. It's also where you can group together parts of your file for more efficient access. The Attachments tab is a terrific way to use your own resources while maintaining continuity in your lessons. Finally, the Activity Builder tab allows you to create your own customized sorting activities. By the end of this lesson, you should feel like a pro in navigating all the sidebar tabs.

Finding Classroom-Ready Lessons
Knowing how the SMART Notebook software works and what the various tools do is not the most important thing when using your SMART Board. Once you have a solid understanding of how things work, it’s critical to shift your focus to content, not bells and whistles. In this lesson, we’re going to focus on finding effective lessons—ones that are already put together for you—to meet your curriculum requirements. I'll be sharing lots of resources to make your teaching life much easier.

Creating Notebook Lessons
Even when we use the Gallery and the Lesson Activity Toolkit, sometimes we still come up a little bit short. What do you do if you can’t find just the right lesson? That's what we'll focus on in this lesson: We’re going to discuss how to make your own SMART notebook lessons. You’ll learn how to create reveal and drag-and-drop experiences. Throughout this lesson, we’ll keep in mind the Marzano lesson design. We'll preview, chunk, and scaffold learning in any lesson we create. Most important of all, we’ll keep our eyes focused on content, not just adding more doodads and gadgets. As I share these tools with you, I’ll also be giving you some great lesson ideas.

Animation, Videos, and Sound
Students learn in different ways. In this lesson, you'll learn to make your SMART Notebook lessons even more visual and interactive. We'll concentrate on how to reach more learners by animating objects, adding your own images, and adding video and sound. Kids love animation and sound, and adding them will make your lessons that much more enticing. Plus, lessons with animation, video, and sound have the ability to reach every kind of learner.

Recording Lessons and Making Your Own Videos
Since videos have become so much a part of our daily experience, it only makes sense to use them in the classroom, too. SMART Notebook includes several multimedia functions to help make learning interactive. In this lesson, we’ll be learning how to use SMART Notebook’s Page Recorder, the SMART Recorder, and the SMART Video Player. Even though these features sound similar, they have distinct characteristics that give them unique utility. By the end of this lesson, you’ll be creating your own recordings and videos to elevate your classroom instruction to an even higher level.

Troubleshooting
Do you know what can stop you dead in your tracks when you’re using your SMART Board? When something doesn’t work. So in this lesson, I’m going to share with you some troubleshooting tips. Ideally, they’ll head off problems before they even arise. If not, this information will give you some quick and easy ways to get back on track. We’ll talk about some of the most common technical problems teachers run into when working with their SMART Boards. Then I’ll talk about fixes for operational problems, like when your board is placed too high for students to comfortably work on it. We’ll also look at a few more features of the SMART Notebook software. Then we’ll wrap up the course with a look at some additional tools that you might consider for use in the future.

Course 8 - Certificate in Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6 Online Course

Getting Started: Writing Basics

Begin a journey through the writing process with a look at your fellow travelers: your students! We'll discuss the types of writers that emerge in grades 4-6 and find ways to encourage and motivate them. You'll also explore the basics of teaching writing by learning how to create an engaging writing task with a specific audience and purpose. At the end of this lesson, you'll pack a writing suitcase to organize your materials and learn how to create a writer-friendly classroom.

The Writing Process: Part 1

Learn the importance of modeling your writing skills as you teach your students about the writing process. We'll start with an overview of the process and then focus on the first two steps in our writing journey: prewriting and drafting. Some intriguing superheroes will help your students learn effective prewriting techniques like brainstorming, freewriting, and mapping. And we'll wrap up our lesson with a friendly monster who will help you teach essay

The Writing Process: Part 2

Today we'll continue our travels through the writing process with a study of the last three steps: revising, editing, and publishing. You'll learn how to help students become confident peer revisers as they check papers for content and clarity while still respecting the author's sense of ownership. Next, we'll discuss how you can help students focus on writing mechanics during the editing step. In both revising and editing, you'll encourage your students to collaborate, coach, and correct. Finally, you'll find ways to let your students share their writing as their voices are fully realized in the publishing step.

Ways to Strengthen Writing

It's time to get out your barbells because this lesson is about strengthening your students' writing. We'll focus on specific strategies for constructing intriguing sentences that vary in length and style. To be strong writers, your students will need some nourishment, so we'll learn how to use a submarine sandwich to teach paragraph structure. Using this formula, your students will become proficient at writing topic sentences, supporting sentences with transitions, and concluding sentences. Finally, we'll see how to use technology as a tool for strengthening writing.

Enhancing Writing Instruction With Trade Books
Reading and writing have a natural relationship. When students connect these skills, they strengthen both abilities and enhance their learning. In this lesson, we're going to explore how to foster an eagerness for writing and teach writing skills using children's trade books. Then you'll discover and develop writing prompts that allow your students to effectively communicate their understanding of literature.

Narrative Writing

"Once upon a time . . ." Remember the wonderful books you read as a child? Today we'll bring that "once upon a time" magic into our students' lives as we help them see that good stories aren't just found in books—they're in each of us as well. Our topic is narrative writing, and we'll explore the skills students need to tell stories. You'll learn how to help students create memorable characters, vivid settings, and descriptive plots. Finally, we'll consider ways to expand your students' writing repertoire using different writing genres.

Expository Writing
Can you count how many research papers you've been asked to write? At some point, your students will certainly be given this assignment, so now's the time to teach them about expository writing. Expository writing is simply writing that explains or informs. In this lesson, we'll start by looking at three expository elements: focus, support, and structure. Next, you'll find ways to teach your students how to conduct research and take notes. Finally, you'll learn how to help them organize all of the information into an exceptional report.

Persuasive Writing

Our young students often feel unheard in an adult-dominated society. But with persuasive writing, they come to know that what they think matters and what they have to say can make a difference. That's a powerful motivation to write! Today you'll learn how to walk your students through the prewriting step, where they'll choose a topic, decide on a position statement, and research evidence that supports their view. Next, we'll help them learn to hook their readers in their introduction, use different persuasive appeals in the body of their essay, and leave a memorable impact with their conclusion. Finally, we'll help them avoid the pitfalls of certain fallacies that can undermine their efforts.

Writing Across the Curriculum
Writing isn't just for English class! It's a valuable tool to help your students learn other topics more deeply. In this lesson, as we explore writing across the curriculum, you'll learn how to provide plenty of writing opportunities in every subject area. We'll explore summary writing and journal writing as ways to write about a subject. And then we'll move on to writing projects that are unique for each content area. Finally, we'll finish with some engaging ideas for writing about famous people in any content area.

A Trait-Based Approach to Writing

Good, effective writing lets readers enjoy the journey with the writer, moving them toward a clear destination while blending the author's voice with the reader's emotions. The 6 + 1 Trait Writing method helps our students create a reciprocal relationship with their readers. Today you'll learn practical strategies for teaching the six writing traits: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Then you'll discover the "plus 1" and ways to make your students' writing presentations appealing. When students can pull all these traits together, they'll have writing that makes a memorable impression on their readers!

Writer's Workshop
In this lesson, we'll combine all the writing strategies we've learned and see how they fit into a Writer's Workshop. You'll be excited to discover how students can use the writing process, learn writing skills, practice different applications, and work collaboratively using the Writer's Workshop model. We'll divide our study of this teaching approach into three components: the mini-lesson, the small group and independent work time, and the sharing session. And an example of Writer's Workshop in action will help you visualize its use in your own classroom.

Writing Assessments

Assessment is the final topic for our course. However, it isn't the "end of the road" for your students' writing experiences. In this lesson, you'll learn that assessment is an ongoing process that you can use as a tool for improving both learning and teaching. We'll start with a comparison of traditional and alternative assessment options. Next, we'll focus on how to use authentic writing tasks and portfolios to assess writing. Finally, you'll learn how to develop and use rubrics so you'll be well-equipped to evaluate your students' writing.

Course 9 - Certificate in Teaching Writing: Grades K-3 Online Course

 Growing Young Writers

What makes teaching writing so important for our K-3 students? In our first lesson, we'll discuss the relevance of writing instruction in early elementary school, and we'll look at some practical ways to grow writers in our classrooms. We'll talk about providing role models and celebration and meeting students at their developmental and skill levels. We'll also visit some classrooms to see how teachers apply these strategies with their students!

Growing Talkers

Today we'll look carefully at the connections between oral language and writing. We'll discuss young children's varying literacy experiences at home and how this affects their work when they first enter elementary school; we'll look at specific ways oral language affects writing; and we'll examine strategies for helping students move from oral language to writing. We'll also pop into some K-3 classrooms to visit teachers in action!

Growing Scribblers

In this lesson, we'll begin to explore the developmental stages of writing, starting with the scribbling stage and moving on to the letter-like symbols stage. Then we'll visit a kindergarten classroom and a resource room to get some great tips for working with these young writers.

Growing Explorers

We'll continue our investigation of the developmental stages of writing today. In this lesson, we'll focus on the strings of letter stage and the beginning sounds stage. This is where students begin to explore writing with confidence, which is why we call these students explorers! And as we did in the last lesson, we'll pop into our kindergarten class and resource room to see how our teachers work with students in these two stages.

Growing Risk-takers

What does it mean to be a risk-taker? When it comes to writing, our young risk-takers are ready to make bold choices when they put their pens to the paper. Today we'll look at these two developmental stages: consonants represent words and initial, middle, and final sounds. We'll continue to see students increase their knowledge of sound to letters, learn how to incorporate vowels, and expand the details in their writing. And we'll discuss strategies you can use to help your students achieve this success!

Growing Butterflies

Today we'll explore the final two stages of developmental writing: transitional and standard spelling. The standard spelling stage is our goal for all students, although they'll always be works in progress as they move toward this goal. We'll learn ways to grow these budding butterflies, and we'll visit some classrooms to see teachers in action.

Writer's Workshop

There are many different ways to hold successful writer's workshops! And this will be our focus for this lesson: examining the writer's workshop as a tool to meet the diverse needs of all of our writers. We'll investigate the three components of a successful writer's workshop: the mini-lesson, writing time, and sharing time. And we'll visit with some of our teachers to see how they implement a writer's workshop and incorporate it into their curriculum!

The Six Traits of Writing

What does great writing look like? There's no easy answer to this question, of course. And that's just what we're going to discuss in today's lesson—how to define and teach the traits of great writing. The method we'll review in this lesson is called the six traits of writing. These traits consist of ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. We'll talk about how to teach these skills to writers at every developmental stage—and as usual, we'll visit some classrooms to see our teachers working with this method in action!

Conferencing With Students

In this lesson, we'll be discussing writing conferences. We'll talk about the different types of conferences and how to conduct effective conferences with students at varying developmental levels. We'll also examine rubrics and how to use them to assess student writing. And as always, we'll visit some of our writing coaches to see them working with students in action.

Navigating Roadblocks

So far, we've talked about the traits of good writing and helping students at different developmental stages. But what do we do to help those students who struggle with some of the physical aspects of writing? In this lesson, we'll talk about navigating roadblocks such as trouble with fine motor skills, posture, and stamina. We'll also discuss specific tactics for reversing letter reversals!

Getting Into Genres

Today's lesson is all about genres! We'll look at narrative, expository, procedural, persuasive, and transactional writing. First, we'll discuss how genre study motivates students and increases their writing and reading comprehension skills. Next, we'll carefully examine the components of each genre and how to support our young writers as they write in each of them. And finally, we'll see how our teachers incorporate these genres into their classroom instruction.

Teamwork Gets It "Write": Building the Home-School Connection

We're going to spend our final lesson discussing how to work with parents to support their young writers at home. We'll talk about how to have productive conferences with parents about their children's writing, and we'll examine answers to some common (and often tough!) parent questions. We'll also discuss a great activity you can organize for your students and their parents: Family Writing Night!

Course 10 - Certificate in Speed Reading: Merrill Ream Online Course

Introduction
On this first day of class, you'll read a story to evaluate your present reading rate. You'll learn how many words per minute you read now, and then we'll compare that number to what percent of the reading material you're really comprehending. You'll also get an opportunity to check out the speed reading accomplishments of some of my former students. Then, you'll complete an eye-span exercise to start you on the path toward becoming a speed reader!

Reading Against Time
In this lesson, you'll practice some basic reading eye movements and learn how they're important to the speed reading process. Then, you'll take a reading rate and comprehension test. Your results will give you a baseline that you can use to chart your speed reading progress in this course, lesson-by-lesson. From there, you can set goals to increase you reading rate while maintaining a good reading comprehension.

Speed Reading Activities
By now, you might feel that the activities you're using to master your speed reading skills are becoming routine and repetitive. So today, we'll talk about how and why you should continue doing the Regulated Reading, Timed Reading, and Assignment exercises to gain increased reading rates with good reading comprehension. Finally, you'll read some stories that are formatted to help you improve your speed.

Setting Goals
Today, we'll examine the retinal image phenomena and how it relates to a speed reader's eye movements. Speed reading is a skill that's best achieved by doing repetitive practice, so we'll continue working on those exercises that are helping you to improve your speed.

Overcoming Poor Reading Habits
You'll probably find it helpful to work on lesson activities in the same comfortable and familiar surroundings. In this lesson, we'll talk about eight bad reading habits that contribute to slow reading, then we'll explore how to overcome them. Finally, we'll review some terminology that's unique to speed reading.

Sixteen Good Speed Reading Practices
In this lesson, we'll look at 16 good speed reading practices you can apply to our course exercises and any other reading you do outside of class. We're at the midpoint in the course, so this is also a good time to compare your reading rate and comprehension scores with those of the former students you read about in Lesson 1. From there, we'll set goals for you to meet in the remaining lessons.

Skimming Techniques
You'll probably be reading pretty quickly by the time you reach this lesson, but how can you make sure your comprehension scores are keeping up? Today, we'll look at skills you'll need to work on to improve your comprehension. You'll find out what keys and identified parts are unique to all stories, and knowing those will help you to improve your comprehension. You'll be glad to learn that you already know a few speed reading skills and techniques as we continue to apply them to our course activities.

Measuring Reading Rates
Today, you'll practice speed reading skills and techniques in real-world reading materials outside of class. You'll learn a method you can use to measure your speed reading rates when you're reading such materials. At this point, you'll be eager to read outside materials, not just for their content, but to further develop your speed reading skills and techniques.

Speed Reading Styles
We're now ready to analyze your personal speed reading style. You'll once again compare your speed reading rate and comprehension scores with those of former students in Lesson 1 to see how you stack up against others. We'll also compare your current scores with the scores you recorded at the beginning of the course to see how far you've come!

Vocabulary and Comprehension Skills
Today, we'll look at eight word recognition vocabulary skills that you can work into your personal speed reading style. You'll learn how context clues and literal and inferential meanings in stories influence comprehension. All are part of the English language and fit right in with speed reading.

Assessing Your Progress
Today, we'll see if we can figure out which of your behavior patterns are most useful in your own speed reading style. First and foremost, you need flexibility to focus on improving your reading speed, then you need an experimental attitude to get rid of poor reading habits. We'll study how the time you put in and the effort you expend affect your speed reading progress.

Wrapping Up
In our last lesson, we'll look at your personal speed reading accomplishments, as well as your speed reading future. Form here on out, you're in the real world of reading. But you'll go into it with a lifelong speed reading skill. You'll learn how to adjust your personal speed reading style to any materials you read, because now you are a speed reader!

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

About this Course

Get Understanding Adolescents, Enhancing Language Development in Childhood, Guided Reading and Writing, Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom, Content Literacy: Grades 6-12, Differentiating K-12 Assessments, Teaching Smarter With SMART Boards, Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6, Teaching Writing: Grades K-3 and Speed Reading: Merrill Ream in this Bundle

1. Understanding Adolescents: Learn about understanding adolescents

Learn About the Many Physical, Emotional, and Cognitive Changes that Affect Teens
Yesterday, she was a sweet young girl. Today, you swear aliens have abducted her and put an evil twin in her place.

To know your kids is to love them. In this course, an experienced social worker will help you gain a deep understanding and appreciation of your adolescent's development and behavior. You'll uncover the secrets of the adolescent mind and gain valuable information on how they think, how they feel, and how their identities develop.

Parents, family members, child and youth workers, counselors and the like will all benefit from the information shared in this course.

You'll learn about the many physical, emotional, and cognitive changes that affect the teens in your life, and you'll understand the significance of these changes both for you and the adolescent. You'll look into relationships both in and outside of the home and the development of a teen's identity. You'll explore personality, moral development and the role of faith.

Finally, you'll gain an understanding as to how teens are affected by stress, including common defense mechanisms, coping techniques, and common mental health issues.

By the time you finish this Certificate in Understanding Adolescents Online Course, you should be very well-prepared to understand, appreciate, and meet the needs of the teens in your life.

2. Enhancing Language Development in Childhood: Learn about enhancing language development in childhood

Learn How to Enhance Language Development in Children
Follow your child's lead and have fun while enhancing language development!
In this fun and user-friendly course for parents, teachers, and caregivers, you will discover how children learn to process language and how they become proficient speakers and thinkers. This Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course will help you enrich your child's life by stimulating his or her continued speech, brain, and language development in an enjoyable, age-appropriate, and natural way.

3. Guided Reading and Writing: Learn about guided reading and writing

Learn How to Guide Your Students to Reading and Writing
Get the professional development training you need to improve student literacy as an accomplished teacher shares the secrets of turning guided reading strategies into opportunities for teaching writing. The road to literacy is also the road to ingenuity, invention, and imagination, and you'll soon learn how to take your students from groans to grins with creative lesson plans that really work!

We'll start our journey by talking about the reasons reading and writing are so difficult for students. Then we'll meet the total literacy framework and see how it mitigates literacy problems once and for all. Since this framework is based on guided reading lessons that flow naturally into writing challenges, you'll learn the recipe for a successful guided reading into writing lesson.

Once the framework is in place, we'll investigate a number of ways to modify this basic recipe for a variety of K-12 circumstances, wrapping up with a look at good writing habits and the traits of a productive writing conference. If you're looking for the right way to get students excited about the power of literacy, this Certificate in Guided Reading and Writing Online Course is for you!

4. Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom: Learn about Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom

Teach Reading in Enjoyable Way
Differentiated instruction tactics will help you understand how your students learn so you can teach in a way that makes sense to them. When you apply those tactics within the guided reading framework, which helps you lead students through new ways of approaching text, great things start to happen. The result is a classroom full of students who are able to negotiate increasingly challenging texts with unprecedented fluency.

This Certificate in Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom Online Course is critical for today's educators, who often have to teach on the run with limited resources and unlimited demands on their time. Get ready to reach your readers with ease in no time flat!

5.Content Literacy: Grades 6-12: Discover literacy development strategies that will make content come alive for each and every student!

Learn How to Develop Literacy Skills
Students must develop literacy skills in order to access, learn, and comprehend. And with the adoption of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), teachers in all subject areas—science, humanities, history, social sciences, mathematics, and technology—are finding themselves actively involved in their students' literacy development, including skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. In this course, you'll discover literacy development strategies that will make content come alive for each and every student.

We'll review the new literacy standards to see how they relate to the content areas, and uncover the many ways adolescent development is connected to effective teaching. We'll explore differentiated education and see how easy it can be to deliver content to students at varying levels of literacy development. You'll also see how student learning centers can provide a valuable, real-world model of how content learning and literacy skill development can happen simultaneously in every classroom.

In addition, you'll analyze your current teaching practices to identify the effective literacy development that you're already doing. We'll work together to adapt some of your favorite lessons to enhance reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language development. By the end of the course, you'll be confident in your ability to utilize the best of what's new, keep the best of what you've already got, and enjoy being a great 21st-century teacher!

6. Differentiating K-12 Assessments: Assessment is the key to helping every student succeed!

Start Now To Learn Differentiating K-12 Assessments
Differentiated assessment is the key to helping every student succeed—and no matter what grade you're teaching, this course will give you the tools you need to gather your assessment data quickly and easily.

You'll begin by exploring strategies for performing pre-assessments, formative (ongoing) assessments, and summative assessments. Next, you'll discover how to identify and share learning goals, gather assessment information, adjust your instruction, and provide feedback to your students. Real-life examples will help you see how differentiated assessment provides direction for improvement, promotes confidence, and motivates your learners to do their best.

Whether you're a new or experienced teacher, you'll gain skill and confidence as you get hands-on practice in using a wide range of assessment techniques. By the time you've completed these lessons, you'll have a clear roadmap for differentiating your assessments and a wealth of practical ideas you can start using in your classroom right away.

7. Teaching Smarter With SMART Boards: Revolutionize Today's Classroom

Use SMART Boards to Engage Learners
SMART Boards are revolutionizing today's classroom. Using these exciting interactive whiteboards, you can create multimedia lessons that engage learners and address their diverse needs.

But having SMART Boards in the classroom and knowing how to use them to provide quality instruction are two different things! If you have a Smart Board in your classroom but have little training in using it, you may be wondering—"What on earth do I do with it?"

In this class, you'll discover how to create outstanding presentations with SMART Board and SMART Notebook technology. You'll explore the basics of using these tools and discover how to create your own SMART board lessons blending text, videos, and graphics. You'll also go beyond the bells and whistles and look at specific ways to use SMART technology to broaden your content and make your lessons accessible to all students. Finally, you'll get some simple trouble-shooting tips that will come in handy if your SMART board isn't acting as smart as it should.

By the time you're done with this course, you'll be an expert at using your new high-tech tools to plan SMART board lessons that provide engaging, thought-provoking, and easy-to-update material for today's media-savvy learners.

8. Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6: Master Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6

Learn Different Teaching Techniques in Writing Grades 4-6
In this Certificate in Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6 Online Course, you'll learn from an experienced educator how to motivate and assist developing writers. We'll begin with an overview of the writing basics, focusing on the importance of the task, audience, and purpose. Then we'll delve into how to organize your materials to create an inviting writing environment.

We'll discuss each step of teaching writing and the strategies you can use with your students. You'll also work on strengthening your students' writing using technology. Along the way, you'll develop engaging lessons for literary response, narrative writing, expository writing, and persuasive writing. We'll look at the characteristics of each type of writing, and you'll get practical suggestions for teaching them to your class.

Two writing approaches we'll cover, 6+1 Trait Writing and Writer's Workshop, will enable you to put everything you learn in this course into a workable format. You'll also discover the secrets of effective writing assessment as you learn about evaluation tools like portfolios and rubrics.

9. Teaching Writing: Grades K-3: Practical ideas to motivate students in your classroom!

Start Now To Learn Teaching Writing: Grades K-3
From the time that a young child picks up a crayon and makes marks on a paper to when an older child puts the finishing sentence on an autobiography or a poem, a young author is developing the skills that will be used for a lifetime. In this course, you'll examine the developmental stages of writing, from scribbling to the standard spelling stage, so that you can foster your students' skills and gently nudge them to grow as authors. This course is full of practical ideas that you can use to motivate students in your classroom.

You'll look at tools such as the writer's workshop, the six traits of writing, and genre studies for ways to teach students about writing. You'll see how each of these tools can be used by teachers to encourage early elementary writers. As your students become better writers, they will become better readers, and you'll see how well reading and writing instruction work together to support each other.

The course also covers ways to support the writers who struggle, whether due to a lack of motivation, fine motor skills, or ideas. And of course, you'll explore techniques for getting parents involved so that they can help with writing at home. By the end of the course, you'll have a new enthusiasm for teaching that will ignite your students' love of writing!

10. Speed Reading: Merrill Ream: Learn about Speed Reading: Merrill Ream

Learn The Skills and Techniques in Speed Reading and Profiency
Taught by acclaimed speed reading expert Dr. Merrill Ream, this Certificate in Speed Reading: Merrill Ream Online Course is a complete speed reading experience. Topics are presented in a logical progression with plenty of time to help you master the skills and techniques you'll need for lasting proficiency as a speed reader.

For comprehensive information on units of study click the units of study tab above.

This is an incredible opportunity to invest in yourself and your future, sharpen your training skills and learn what it takes to create your own success with Courses For Success Today!

Course Fast Facts:

  1. This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  2. Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  3. You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  4. You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  5. You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete each course receive a certificate of completion per course, with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

The Understanding Adolescents 10 Course Bundle includes the following courses, below is a summary of each course: 

Course 1 - Certificate in Understanding Adolescents Online Course

Introduction

In our first lesson, I'll explain the term adolescent development and familiarize you with some terminology. I'll also provide you with an overview of the three main stages of adolescence to help you become familiar with the tasks and milestones inherent in each stage.

Biological Development

Adolescence is a time of change. These changes occur on the outside as well as on the inside. For this lesson, we’re going to focus on some external changes, and one of the things we'll look at is puberty, the impact it can have on the adolescent, as well as how these changes can affect how you treat an adolescent.

Cognitive Development

In this lesson, we'll start looking at some of the internal changes kids experience during adolescence. As children's bodies take huge leaps forward, so do their brains as they learn and discover new ways of thinking and reasoning. This is cognitive development, which means how someone thinks, and that'll be our focus for this lesson.

Social Development I

The dreaded peer group. During today's lesson, we’ll take a close look at socialization, peers and peer groups, friends, intimacy, and social changes in your adolescent's behavior.

Social Development II

One of the things that changes most during adolescence is a child's family relationships and how family members interact with each other. In this lesson, we'll take a look at some of those changes and the impact this may have on both the adolescent and the family.

Emotional Development

Emotional development is one of the internal changes that evolves during adolescence. During today's lesson we’ll take a look at some aspects of emotions and their development, and the significance this may have for adolescent development.

Identity and Self-Concept

This is the “Who Am I?” lesson. Today, we'll explore how we think about ourselves, how our identity develops, what might influence our identity, and our self-concept.

Moral Development and Faith

Today's lesson is all about moral development and faith separate from religion. We'll look at how the changes to the adolescent play a role in their moral development. You'll become familiar with the overall thoughts, ideas and processes that seem common to adolescent moral development.

Stress

In this lesson, we're going to take a close look at stress, anxiety, frustration, and defense mechanisms. We'll explore how these things affect all of us and how some of this is demonstrated during adolescence.

Influences on Development

For this lesson, we'll adopt a slightly different format. Today, we'll look at four separate things: nature versus nurture, temperament, personality, and resiliency. The main thread carried throughout this lesson is how a better understanding of ourselves can help us to better understand others.

Adolescent Needs

Similar to the last lesson, today we'll look at a few more distinct topics. First we'll review some of the adolescent needs that we've discussed prior to this lesson, then we'll discuss chronic illness, gay and lesbian youth and the issues these individuals may be faced with, and finally a chapter highlighting parenting the adolescent.

When Something Goes Wrong

For our last lesson, we're going to stray from the normal to the abnormal part of adolescent development. The focus of this lesson will be a brief overview of disorders or conditions that are consistently viewed within the adolescent population.

Course 2 - Certificate in Enhancing Language Development in Childhood Online Course

Introduction

How do children learn language? Play! And not with flash cards, or anything else that you can buy. Children are born with a complete package of language-learning tools. The only accessory they need is you, helping them unlock their natural instincts for language. After reading this first section, you'll be using play and instinct to communicate soundlessly with a newborn, to help him fill his language-building toolbox, and to create a stimulating environment for language development.

First Play: Sounds & Signs

Imagine a database of sounds in your child’s brain. Where do these sounds come from? How does she file, sort, and choose to use these sounds to communicate? In today's lesson, we'll look at why her mind is made for these remarkable tasks, and you'll learn straightforward ways you can lend a hand (even in the form of sign language!). This lesson also includes a fascinating overview of brain and mouth anatomy.

Mama and Other First Real Words
You say, “Shelly just said, ‘ball’!” But your friend says, “Nah, that was just babbling.” Who's right? Does something count as a real word if it isn’t pronounced perfectly? In this lesson, we'll explore what makes a word real and how to interpret your child’s patterns of simplifying early language. You'll also start using a journal to uncover the rich potential in your child’s one- and two-word phrases.

Understanding Before Speaking

Once you understand the mechanics of hearing and understanding, your role in encouraging language can be powerful, simple, and fun! Many caregivers ask at this stage when they should start to worry about language delays. In today's lesson, we'll soothe your concerns by discussing what to watch for, when to seek assistance (and from which type of specialist), and when to stop worrying and keep playing! We'll look through a list of typical first words that you can use to trace your child’s communication explosion.

Watching & Playing
Can you guess when a baby’s brain grows the most? How do you facilitate this growth? Again, the answer is play! In this lesson, we'll match favorite infant-caregiver games to the neurological functions they stimulate. You'll also learn how language affects the development of thinking skills, just as the function of thinking affects language development. Today we'll explore how to keep this circle of growth cycling.

Adding Pieces to Phrases

Your kiddo is talking, but you’re not done yet! Although two-word phrases, such as “get ball” certainly communicate an idea, your child will keep refining his sentences as he grows. Today you'll find out how to help him progress to past tense, contractions, pronouns, and conjunctions. You'll also learn about the fascinating thought processes behind questions. Don’t forget your journal!

Be A Natural Model
Wow–now we have listening, speaking, sounds, words, and sentences. What more is there? Lots! Is it still fun? Does she still need you? Of course! In today's lesson, we'll continue with a few more do's and don'ts for caregivers, emphasizing our favorite learning tool: games!

Making the Tongue Take Off

Expanding on our earlier anatomy lesson, today you'll learn how sounds depend on strong, agile mouth muscles. Before you start thinking about tongue push-ups, remember we always focus on maximizing the opportunities within natural interactions. A discussion of feeding—including your choices of bottles, cups, and straws—is key. We'll answer complex and controversial questions about pacifiers, sippy cups, and thumb sucking, and I'll provide some great tips for easing necessary transitions.

Playing With Sounds
Some sounds sound fun (like boing!), and some sounds feel fun (like zzzzzz). What does this kind of fun teach if it doesn't use precise words? In today's lesson, you'll find out what you're teaching when you encourage your little one to play with sounds. You'll also learn which speech games will help you make the connection from speech to reading.

Talking More

Now you know that speech, language, and communication are different, but related, topics. Using your knowledge of how sounds make language, in this lesson, you'll learn how language is used to communicate and connect with others. We call this social use of language. Today you'll learn how to help your talker become a conversationalist!

Appreciating Differences
Although children follow similar development processes, no two walk the same path. As more is discovered about learning, the lines between different, delayed, and disability grow foggier. Demystifying these terms is easier when you learn about different learning styles, and when you understand the styles used by you and your child. While you can’t eavesdrop on your child’s thoughts, what you learn in today's lesson will help you help her connect her learning style and her use of language.

A Word About Literature

Teaching a child the alphabet tends to be our first step toward reading, but is it where literacy begins? While this skill can be gratifying for adults to see, literacy begins in the brain and is nurtured with fun and games. As you've learned about language skills, literacy doesn’t come in a box from the store. When you understand instincts and use them in fun and play, they come from you.

Course 3 - Certificate in Guided Reading and Writing Online Course

Why Is It So Hard to Read and Write?
Have you ever wondered why so many of your students struggle to read and write? You're not alone! In this introductory lesson, we'll discuss why these two subjects are so hard for students and how we can make their lives a little easier. Get ready for some creative suggestions that you can read about today and use in the classroom tomorrow.

The Total Literacy Framework

In order to really help our struggling readers and writers, we need a framework for implementing positive change. The total literacy framework is just the thing: Guided reading, writing, engagement, and assessment are the components that make it so effective. The best part is that this framework allows us a lot of flexibility and opportunities for success as we meet diverse learner needs. We'll discuss guided reading, writing, and engagement in today's lesson and look at assessment next time.

Where Does Assessment Fit In?

Assessment is the part of the total literacy framework that drives instruction. After all, we need to know where students are academically and where they need to go before we can teach them effectively. So in today's lesson, let's take a look at fun and simple ways to assess students' reading and writing skills without taking up too much class time.

Recipe for a Guided Reading and Writing Lesson

Since a lot of our course is going to focus on turning guided reading lessons into writing opportunities within the total literacy framework, we need to begin with a basic guided reading and writing recipe. The recipe we'll go over in this lesson is one that you can easily modify for any K-12 setting, and it's dotted with examples from real classrooms where guided reading and writing are changing lives.

Writing Stories

Have you ever read a great story only to think, "I could write something better than that"? Well, guess what? Your students think the exact same thing. Why not give them an opportunity to write stories after reading great books during guided reading time? You'll learn all the tricks in this action-packed lesson.

Composing Nonfiction

Nonfiction is often thought of as the ugly stepsister to its more creative counterpart, fiction. However, with a little imagination, you can make nonfiction come alive in your classroom. And even better, you can help your students write compelling articles after they read nonfiction. In this lesson, you'll learn how you can make fiction's stepsister a little less ugly.

Writing Poetry

Some students absolutely hate reading and writing poetry, but they won't after you introduce the techniques we're going to discuss today! If you're eager to bring out the natural poet in your budding writers, this lesson will give you just the creative jumpstart you've been waiting for. As an added bonus, you'll take a tour of the different kinds of poetry that inspire students.

Developing Papers

Writing papers is never going to be the most interesting part of school, but it's always going to be necessary. So in this lesson, we'll discuss how to teach students to read research material and use it as a launch pad for papers that are clear and thought-provoking the first time around. We'll even discuss some techniques that make the whole process a little more enjoyable.

Crafting Ideas Across the Content Areas

One of the neat things about employing the total literacy framework is that we can extend it across the content areas. In today's lesson, you'll learn how to use guided reading and writing to your advantage whether you're teaching math, social studies, or science. The best part is that your students will learn that reading and writing are never isolated endeavors!

Reinforcing Good Writing Habits
Have you ever written something that was a little hard to understand? Even the best writers can find themselves struggling to make their point as clear as possible. So in this lesson, we'll go over how to teach students to craft their own style, hone their organization, and check for proper mechanics before they turn in any assignments.

Holding Writing Conferences
Writing conferences are a great chance to make sure students are successful as they turn reading into writing and writing into ideas. I'm always surprised at how much I can accomplish by taking only a few minutes a week to discuss a student's writing. In this lesson, we'll discuss the power of conferences and how to make the most of them.

Turning Small Successes Into Big Rewards
As we're building the total literacy framework in our classrooms, it's important to take time to encourage and inspire students by turning their small successes into big rewards. If you're looking for new strategies to motivate students and make reading and writing fun, you won't want to miss all the tips and tricks in this final lesson!

Course 4 - Certificate in Guided Reading: Differentiated Classroom Online Course

Building a Balanced Library Framework
Have you ever wished you had a good way to reach your struggling readers? If so, you're probably ready to discover the secret that thousands of teachers are already using to transform their reading instruction: differentiated instruction combined with guided reading. We'll take our first look at it in this lesson, and I'll explain how blending these techniques will help you build a balanced literary framework that helps your students negotiate a variety of texts with success.

Getting to Know Your Readers
The first step in helping your students is getting to know who they are and how their minds work. In this lesson, you'll learn how to evaluate your students' readiness, interests, learning profiles, and social elements. Then you can use this information to drive meaningful, focused instruction that will help them see reading as a pleasure rather than a chore.

Planning Assessments
Assessment is at the heart of differentiated instruction because you have to know where your students are before you take them somewhere new. In today's lesson, learn how to plan quality pre-, ongoing, and summative assessments that will give you a clear picture of student learning. The best part of assessing students at multiple intervals is that you can tell what is working and what isn't, adjusting teaching strategies as you go.

Grouping Students
In this lesson, we'll discuss flexible groups, which are a mainstay in the differentiated classroom because they allow you to combine students for different reasons on different days. Sometimes you'll combine students based on interests and other times based on readiness or learning profile. However you use flexible groups, you'll appreciate the way this technique lets you accommodate a diversity of students.

Selecting Texts
When it comes to selecting the texts you'll teach, there are literally thousands of options. However, you can narrow them down considerably by understanding the criteria of good fiction and nonfiction texts. You'll be picking the right texts the first time after we finish this lesson.

Framing Your Before Reading
Did you know that a lot of the learning process hinges on what you do to prepare students before they actually start reading? That's what we'll discuss in this lesson. It's easy to just introduce a text and let students have at it, but if you plan the time before reading with activities that build anticipation and ground the text in prior learning, you'll be amazed by the results.

Reading the Text
How students read a text is a highly personal matter, but in the classroom, you have to direct reading to get the greatest results. In this lesson, you'll learn how to teach students the right way to read, to comprehend what they've just read, and to make inferences. The ultimate goal is helping your students have truly meaningful interactions with the text, and I've got just the tricks to help you through.

Navigating the After Reading Framework
Does learning end when students put a book down? I hope not! The time to really help students process the text and extend their learning in new avenues is after students finish reading and have the chance to start thinking for themselves. Today, we'll go over the after-reading framework, where you'll teach students to turn information into ideas as they go beyond the text and into the world.

Tiering With Ease
If you think of your classroom as a ladder, you'll realize that you have a lot of students on a lot of different rungs. In today's lesson, we'll explore tiering, which is a concept that helps you separate students based on their readiness, interests, or learning profiles. The trick is doing so without making students feel like they're more or less competent than others. Are you eager for the secrets? You'll master them in no time!

Anchoring Your Students to Extra Learning
What do you do with those extra 10 or 15 minutes at the end of a lesson or a school day? An increasingly popular idea is to anchor your students to the material they've learned by extending learning in new avenues. You can do this with games, writing prompts, or any number of other fun, creative activities. We'll explore lots of great ideas in today's lesson.

Crafting Independent Reading Projects
Your ultimate goal with the balanced literary framework is to create independent readers who are confident and capable of negotiating new texts with ease. In this lesson, you'll learn the basics of curriculum compacting, learning contracts, and individual projects, strategies to help your students transition to independence. You'll be amazed by how well students learn when they work more independently.

Putting the Puzzle Together
We'll finish up the course in this lesson by discussing the foundation that you build for classroom learning. Your attitude is everything. (That almost bears repeating!) Beyond that, you need to be able to encourage struggling readers and help parents extend the learning at home. Once your foundation is strong, you'll notice that both students and parents take the initiative to build positive reading experiences.

Course 5 - Certificate in Content Literacy: Grades 6-12 Online Course

Fundamentals of Adolescent Literacy
In our first lesson, we'll examine the difference between literacy and literature, and we'll look closely at the adolescent brain and find out how learning during that life stage is different than learning as a baby, child, or adult. You'll get a quick refresher on the concept of learning styles and discover how we can accommodate a diverse group of learners in a classroom. By the time the lesson is over, you'll be ready to explore the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and see how they address the need for grades 6-12 interdisciplinary literacy.

CCSS and Interdisciplinary Literacy
Today we'll explore the history and goals of the CCSS. You'll find out how the developers of the CCSS structured the standards to help prepare students for the 21st century workplace, and you'll see how interdisciplinary literacy fits into the standards. We'll walk through the document together and examine its parts. And finally, we'll discuss how you might use it when you prepare classroom activities.

Text Complexity
We know that students need to read more, and they need to read more complex texts. How would you explain what text complexity is? Today, we'll discuss the three aspects of text complexity as described in the CCSS. And by the end of the lesson, you'll see how you can use text complexity analysis in your content area classroom to help students develop their reading skills and more readily master your academic material.

Reading Strategies That Build Comprehension in the Content Areas
In this lesson, we'll take an in-depth look at the CCSS reading standards. First, we'll examine the reading anchor standards and see how they're articulated for different grade levels as students read both literature and informational texts. Then, we'll discuss practical examples of reading strategies that you can use in your own content area classroom. By the end of this lesson, you'll have a clear picture of how to use reading strategies to build comprehension in your content area.

Writing Strategies That Build Comprehension in the Content Areas
Today we'll explore the writing standards and see how the CCSS articulates them for different grade levels. We'll look at some practical writing strategies that are ideally suited for the content area classroom, and then we'll pop by Ms. X Ample's classroom to see one of those strategies in practice. We'll also examine some of the most common tricks of the trade among English Language Arts teachers, and you'll see how you can apply them to your classroom. After seeing what writing strategies look like in practice, you'll be inspired to try them yourself!

Speaking and Listening in the Content Areas
Don't assume your students have mastered their speaking and listening skills. Today we'll explore the Common Core State Standards for speaking and listening. You'll examine how the broad goals of the anchor standards are articulated for the 6-12 grade levels, and we'll take a close look at some speaking and listening activities that are ideally suited for the content area classroom. Along the way, we'll go over a few techniques for maintaining control in a conversational classroom.

Argumentation as Literacy Development
Most teenagers enjoy a good debate. There's nothing inherently wrong with this. In fact, we've all seen a well-argued debate lead to some pretty exciting outcomes. So let's take a close look at how argumentation is related to literacy and learn ways to reinforce and encourage the value of debate in your content area classroom.

Developing Academic Language in the Content Areas
Language is the basic building block of any society. It's how we communicate, and it's how we record events. In this lesson, we'll examine the CCSS goals for language development, and you'll learn how to help students achieve these goals in your own classroom.

Technology and Literacy
Technology has significantly changed the way we teach. Today's lesson is all about integrating the CCSS technology standards into the content area classroom. You'll discover how content learning, classroom technology, and literacy development complement each other and can occur simultaneously. Worried you're not an IT person and don't have the technological skills to succeed? Don't be. We'll address that, too, and by the end of this lesson, you'll be ready to roll up your sleeves and dive headfirst into the technology deep end!

Student Learning Centers
Student learning centers are a valuable, real-world model of how content learning and literacy skill development can happen simultaneously in every classroom. In this lesson, you'll learn how to repurpose existing lesson activities as learning center activities, and you'll find out why this approach to working with students in the upper grades is a practical way to integrate literacy development and content learning.

Assessment: How Will I Know It's Working?
In today's lesson, you'll find out how content literacy affects formative assessments and summative assessments. You'll learn what formative assessment is and isn't, and you'll learn the three steps to a well-implemented formative assessment. We'll also look at how Ms. X Ample incorporates this type of assessment into her instruction. We'll discuss the five building blocks of formative assessment, and you'll learn some simple strategies you can use in your classroom. We'll also take a close look at summative assessments, and you'll find out about the two new assessment consortia that will administer standardizedtests: Smarter
Literacy Evolution in the Classroom
In our final lesson for this course, we'll make a plan to use the best of what's new, keep the best of what you've already got, and enjoy being a great 21st century teacher. We'll wrap up everything you've learned throughout this course, and we'll examine tools you can use to integrate the CCSS with your existing lesson plans and your school's curriculum.

Course 6 - Certificate in Differentiating K-12 Assessments Online Course

What Is Differentiated Assessment?

In your first lesson, you'll meet your instructor and find out how differentiating assessment means more than just increasing our students' end-of-year test scores. We'll start by looking at the four main principles behind differentiated assessment (DA). You'll get a taste of how DA works in a real classroom, and you'll see a powerful example of what this approach can do for students. You'll also receive some hands-on strategies for beginning to use DA in your own classroom. Your first step will be getting to know your students' multiple intelligences, learning styles, social and emotional factors, and personal interests, so you can meet them where they are and begin the process of increasing achievement.

Types of Assessment

In Lesson 2, you'll get an overview of the three different types of assessment: The pre-assessment helps us gauge what students already know. The formative assessment is what we use to monitor and adjust instruction while we're teaching. Finally, we give a summative assessment (traditionally a quiz, test, or project) to summarize learning to a point and assign grades. We'll also talk about ways to keep students who have already mastered the content engaged in learning through anchor activities

Identifying and Sharing Learning Goals

In this lesson, we'll focus on the first principle of DA: indentifying and sharing learning goals with students. We'll start by deconstructing content standards into student-friendly language to tell students what they need to know, understand, and do. This information goes into the KUD chart. We'll also investigate how the KUD chart becomes a checklist to differentiate instruction and a template for designing both pre- and summative assessments. Finally, we'll talk about how to share learning goals with students in ways that motivate them and make our expectations clear.

Completing the Assessment Puzzle

In Lesson 4, we'll look at the last three principles of DA: gathering evidence of understanding, adjusting instruction, and giving feedback to students. We'll start by seeing how you can use a versatile activity in different ways as a formative assessment, and then we'll explore how to use the information you gain from the assessment to adjust instruction. Specifically, you'll see examples of re-teaching in a different way and tiering instruction (adding more complex and less complex activities to accommodate students at different readiness levels). We'll also learn some tactics you can use to give students constructive, descriptive feedback.

Motivating Unmotivated Learners

Have you ever had a student who just didn't seem interested in learning? Today, we'll look at assessment strategies you can use to motivate the unmotivated learners in your classroom. You'll see how something as simple as a remote control can increase attention because it speaks students' digital language. We'll also explore how you can use seating arrangements and open-ended questions to encourage students to participate in classroom discussions. Finally, we'll investigate how you can use the jigsaw strategy to support or challenge learners in the classroom.

Inspiring "Average" Students

Do you have a Mediocre Melanie in your classroom? This student is satisfied with doing only what it takes to get by. She shows up, completes assignments, rarely asks questions, and simply takes up space in the classroom. Today, we'll see how one teacher uses an anticipation guide, the Question-Answer-Relationship strategy, and a visual display to promote learning in students previously satisfied with maintaining the status quo.

Challenging "Gifted" Students

Today, you'll meet Accelerated Alex. He seems to always be one step ahead of other students in the class, so it can be challenging to keep him interested. You'll see how you can use learning contracts and Think-Tac-Toe lessons to challenge him without being weighed down with grading all these individual assignments.

Supporting Struggling Students

In Lesson 8, we'll explore strategies to support students who are struggling to learn information without putting so much stress on them that they shut down. We'll talk about using snowball fights and every-pupil response strategies. You'll also see how you can divide students into groups according to the assessment information you collect from these strategies. This will give you more time to spend with struggling students while keeping the students who are getting it learning and engaged.

Increase Vocabulary, Increase Achievement

Assessing vocabulary doesn't have to be boring. In Lesson 9, you'll learn about engaging vocabulary assessment strategies you can use in your classroom. After all, the stronger students' vocabulary is, the better chance they will have of answering end-of-the-year assessment questions correctly. We'll investigate how the ABC Brainstorm, Most Important Words, What's My Name?, Find My Family, and List-Cluster-Title-Explain strategies bring vocabulary to life while fostering independence and transferring ownership of learning to your students at the same time.

Making the Grade

In Lesson 10, we'll take a look at something that's always a hot topic in the teaching world: grading. If you've ever felt lost while contemplating your grade book, this lesson is for you! You'll get advice to help you grade students against standards, not against each other. How do we really grade assignments? You might be surprised by an exercise that reveals how many of our expectations are implied. We'll look at how to use rubrics effectively to expose these implied expectations, and we'll finish by exploring some common grading practices to avoid. By the end of this lesson, you'll have the framework you need to assign grades with confidence.

Saving Time With DA

As we've been exploring DA ideas throughout this course, have you been thinking to yourself, "How will I ever fit all these extra tasks into my day?" You might be surprised at how little time you need (and how DA can actually save you time)! In today's lesson, we'll investigate how to find time to implement and document assessment practices. You'll see how one teacher uses Quick Check forms to quickly document the mastery levels for each student. We'll explore time-saving techniques to keep bulletin boards updated, and we'll talk about how an assessment menu helps with lesson planning. Finally, you'll learn three new formative assessment strategies that you can use with your students: Four Corners, Muddiest Point, and Lesson Summary. You'll be on the road to saving time in no time!

Road Map for Success

In Lesson 12, we'll bring your DA training full-circle as we look at how to cope with challenges, avoid burnout, and create a road map for successful implementation. This survival guide for busy teachers also includes some of my favorite management tips to streamline grading and choose what to selectively abandon. You'll learn how to transfer your new skills to the real world and see how the skills you've picked up can actually make your life easier while raising achievement at the same time.

Course 7 - Certificate in Teaching Smarter With SMART Boards Online Course

SMART Boards: More Than a Giant Whiteboard
We'll begin this first lesson by taking a close look at exactly what a SMART Board is and focusing on its interactivity potential. What often happens in the classroom is that teachers inherit a SMART Board but don't know what to do with it. As far as they can tell, it's not much more than a whiteboard. So that's what we'll focus on in this lesson: the SMART Board's interactivity potential and its myriad possibilities. At the end of this lesson, you'll be excited and eager to learn more.

Learners Today
As teachers, we cannot turn our backs on technology. Our students have grown up with it. When we look at today’s learners, we have to look at the whole picture, and that includes where they are with current technology. So, in this lesson, we'll talk about some of the more recent learning theories and where technology fits in with them. We’ll go over the different learning types, multiple intelligences, differentiated instruction, and constructivism. We’ll take each theory and see how technology can complement them all. Along the way, I’ll also share with you the difference between digital natives and digital immigrants, an understanding that could help you greatly in your approach to teaching.

Getting Started
Our goal for this lesson is to download the SMART Notebook software and install it on your computer. Once you have the software downloaded and installed, we'll talk about the equipment you'll need to get started. Then we'll cover how to connect your SMART Board to your computer and projector. When we finish with all those technical details, we can start taking a tour of the SMART Board and the SMART Notebook software. By the end of this lesson, you'll be well prepared to begin working with your SMART Board and the SMART Notebook software. Please keep in mind that you do not have to have a Smart Board to complete the work for this class. The SMART Notebook software is the only requirement. The software is the magic with the Smart Board, not the board itself. So, even if you are exploring the idea of using Smart Boards, you can use your computer and create amazing lessons to use later when you actually have a board.

How to Insert Words and Objects Onto Your SMART Board
In this lesson, we'll focus on how to write on the SMART Board, beginning with how to type on it. Then we'll talk about how to write using the collection of pens, how to make shapes, and how to use the eraser. Along the way, I'll share some examples to help illustrate how you can use each of these tools. My goal is to inspire you with some great ideas that you can incorporate into your own classroom.

Capture Tools and Tables
In this lesson, we're going to look at ways to make use of documents you already have. There are a couple of terrific tools to help you do just that: Smart Ink and Capture. Another tool you'll undoubtedly use often is the Table tool. I'm sure you use tables and charts all the time as a teaching tool. The SMART Notebook Table tool makes creating and manipulating tables super easy. And with its other cool features—like being able to cover individual cells until you're ready to reveal them—I'm betting you'll use Table the tool often. Learning how to use these tools will take you another step closer to SMART Board mastery.

The Gallery
In today’s lesson, we’ll focus on the SMART Board Gallery. In the Gallery, you’ll find manipulatives, clip art, images, and more to help you teach every subject area. You can even add your own images to the Gallery to tailor your lessons to your own wishes. We'll also explore two valuable components of the Gallery: Gallery Essentials and My Content. We’ll take an in-depth look at each of these tools so that you’ll be comfortable using them to create highly visual, interactive lessons that will engage and involve your students.

Lesson Activity Toolkit
In this lesson, we'll be digging into the Lesson Activity Toolkit to see what's there and how it can help you with your classroom instruction. With a simple drag and type, you can introduce, review, or enrich learning. We'll also spend some time working with the Page Sorter, Attachments tab, and Activity Builder tab. The Page Sorter is instrumental in helping you see where you are in your SMART Notebook file. It's also where you can group together parts of your file for more efficient access. The Attachments tab is a terrific way to use your own resources while maintaining continuity in your lessons. Finally, the Activity Builder tab allows you to create your own customized sorting activities. By the end of this lesson, you should feel like a pro in navigating all the sidebar tabs.

Finding Classroom-Ready Lessons
Knowing how the SMART Notebook software works and what the various tools do is not the most important thing when using your SMART Board. Once you have a solid understanding of how things work, it’s critical to shift your focus to content, not bells and whistles. In this lesson, we’re going to focus on finding effective lessons—ones that are already put together for you—to meet your curriculum requirements. I'll be sharing lots of resources to make your teaching life much easier.

Creating Notebook Lessons
Even when we use the Gallery and the Lesson Activity Toolkit, sometimes we still come up a little bit short. What do you do if you can’t find just the right lesson? That's what we'll focus on in this lesson: We’re going to discuss how to make your own SMART notebook lessons. You’ll learn how to create reveal and drag-and-drop experiences. Throughout this lesson, we’ll keep in mind the Marzano lesson design. We'll preview, chunk, and scaffold learning in any lesson we create. Most important of all, we’ll keep our eyes focused on content, not just adding more doodads and gadgets. As I share these tools with you, I’ll also be giving you some great lesson ideas.

Animation, Videos, and Sound
Students learn in different ways. In this lesson, you'll learn to make your SMART Notebook lessons even more visual and interactive. We'll concentrate on how to reach more learners by animating objects, adding your own images, and adding video and sound. Kids love animation and sound, and adding them will make your lessons that much more enticing. Plus, lessons with animation, video, and sound have the ability to reach every kind of learner.

Recording Lessons and Making Your Own Videos
Since videos have become so much a part of our daily experience, it only makes sense to use them in the classroom, too. SMART Notebook includes several multimedia functions to help make learning interactive. In this lesson, we’ll be learning how to use SMART Notebook’s Page Recorder, the SMART Recorder, and the SMART Video Player. Even though these features sound similar, they have distinct characteristics that give them unique utility. By the end of this lesson, you’ll be creating your own recordings and videos to elevate your classroom instruction to an even higher level.

Troubleshooting
Do you know what can stop you dead in your tracks when you’re using your SMART Board? When something doesn’t work. So in this lesson, I’m going to share with you some troubleshooting tips. Ideally, they’ll head off problems before they even arise. If not, this information will give you some quick and easy ways to get back on track. We’ll talk about some of the most common technical problems teachers run into when working with their SMART Boards. Then I’ll talk about fixes for operational problems, like when your board is placed too high for students to comfortably work on it. We’ll also look at a few more features of the SMART Notebook software. Then we’ll wrap up the course with a look at some additional tools that you might consider for use in the future.

Course 8 - Certificate in Teaching Writing: Grades 4-6 Online Course

Getting Started: Writing Basics

Begin a journey through the writing process with a look at your fellow travelers: your students! We'll discuss the types of writers that emerge in grades 4-6 and find ways to encourage and motivate them. You'll also explore the basics of teaching writing by learning how to create an engaging writing task with a specific audience and purpose. At the end of this lesson, you'll pack a writing suitcase to organize your materials and learn how to create a writer-friendly classroom.

The Writing Process: Part 1

Learn the importance of modeling your writing skills as you teach your students about the writing process. We'll start with an overview of the process and then focus on the first two steps in our writing journey: prewriting and drafting. Some intriguing superheroes will help your students learn effective prewriting techniques like brainstorming, freewriting, and mapping. And we'll wrap up our lesson with a friendly monster who will help you teach essay

The Writing Process: Part 2

Today we'll continue our travels through the writing process with a study of the last three steps: revising, editing, and publishing. You'll learn how to help students become confident peer revisers as they check papers for content and clarity while still respecting the author's sense of ownership. Next, we'll discuss how you can help students focus on writing mechanics during the editing step. In both revising and editing, you'll encourage your students to collaborate, coach, and correct. Finally, you'll find ways to let your students share their writing as their voices are fully realized in the publishing step.

Ways to Strengthen Writing

It's time to get out your barbells because this lesson is about strengthening your students' writing. We'll focus on specific strategies for constructing intriguing sentences that vary in length and style. To be strong writers, your students will need some nourishment, so we'll learn how to use a submarine sandwich to teach paragraph structure. Using this formula, your students will become proficient at writing topic sentences, supporting sentences with transitions, and concluding sentences. Finally, we'll see how to use technology as a tool for strengthening writing.

Enhancing Writing Instruction With Trade Books
Reading and writing have a natural relationship. When students connect these skills, they strengthen both abilities and enhance their learning. In this lesson, we're going to explore how to foster an eagerness for writing and teach writing skills using children's trade books. Then you'll discover and develop writing prompts that allow your students to effectively communicate their understanding of literature.

Narrative Writing

"Once upon a time . . ." Remember the wonderful books you read as a child? Today we'll bring that "once upon a time" magic into our students' lives as we help them see that good stories aren't just found in books—they're in each of us as well. Our topic is narrative writing, and we'll explore the skills students need to tell stories. You'll learn how to help students create memorable characters, vivid settings, and descriptive plots. Finally, we'll consider ways to expand your students' writing repertoire using different writing genres.

Expository Writing
Can you count how many research papers you've been asked to write? At some point, your students will certainly be given this assignment, so now's the time to teach them about expository writing. Expository writing is simply writing that explains or informs. In this lesson, we'll start by looking at three expository elements: focus, support, and structure. Next, you'll find ways to teach your students how to conduct research and take notes. Finally, you'll learn how to help them organize all of the information into an exceptional report.

Persuasive Writing

Our young students often feel unheard in an adult-dominated society. But with persuasive writing, they come to know that what they think matters and what they have to say can make a difference. That's a powerful motivation to write! Today you'll learn how to walk your students through the prewriting step, where they'll choose a topic, decide on a position statement, and research evidence that supports their view. Next, we'll help them learn to hook their readers in their introduction, use different persuasive appeals in the body of their essay, and leave a memorable impact with their conclusion. Finally, we'll help them avoid the pitfalls of certain fallacies that can undermine their efforts.

Writing Across the Curriculum
Writing isn't just for English class! It's a valuable tool to help your students learn other topics more deeply. In this lesson, as we explore writing across the curriculum, you'll learn how to provide plenty of writing opportunities in every subject area. We'll explore summary writing and journal writing as ways to write about a subject. And then we'll move on to writing projects that are unique for each content area. Finally, we'll finish with some engaging ideas for writing about famous people in any content area.

A Trait-Based Approach to Writing

Good, effective writing lets readers enjoy the journey with the writer, moving them toward a clear destination while blending the author's voice with the reader's emotions. The 6 + 1 Trait Writing method helps our students create a reciprocal relationship with their readers. Today you'll learn practical strategies for teaching the six writing traits: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Then you'll discover the "plus 1" and ways to make your students' writing presentations appealing. When students can pull all these traits together, they'll have writing that makes a memorable impression on their readers!

Writer's Workshop
In this lesson, we'll combine all the writing strategies we've learned and see how they fit into a Writer's Workshop. You'll be excited to discover how students can use the writing process, learn writing skills, practice different applications, and work collaboratively using the Writer's Workshop model. We'll divide our study of this teaching approach into three components: the mini-lesson, the small group and independent work time, and the sharing session. And an example of Writer's Workshop in action will help you visualize its use in your own classroom.

Writing Assessments

Assessment is the final topic for our course. However, it isn't the "end of the road" for your students' writing experiences. In this lesson, you'll learn that assessment is an ongoing process that you can use as a tool for improving both learning and teaching. We'll start with a comparison of traditional and alternative assessment options. Next, we'll focus on how to use authentic writing tasks and portfolios to assess writing. Finally, you'll learn how to develop and use rubrics so you'll be well-equipped to evaluate your students' writing.

Course 9 - Certificate in Teaching Writing: Grades K-3 Online Course

 Growing Young Writers

What makes teaching writing so important for our K-3 students? In our first lesson, we'll discuss the relevance of writing instruction in early elementary school, and we'll look at some practical ways to grow writers in our classrooms. We'll talk about providing role models and celebration and meeting students at their developmental and skill levels. We'll also visit some classrooms to see how teachers apply these strategies with their students!

Growing Talkers

Today we'll look carefully at the connections between oral language and writing. We'll discuss young children's varying literacy experiences at home and how this affects their work when they first enter elementary school; we'll look at specific ways oral language affects writing; and we'll examine strategies for helping students move from oral language to writing. We'll also pop into some K-3 classrooms to visit teachers in action!

Growing Scribblers

In this lesson, we'll begin to explore the developmental stages of writing, starting with the scribbling stage and moving on to the letter-like symbols stage. Then we'll visit a kindergarten classroom and a resource room to get some great tips for working with these young writers.

Growing Explorers

We'll continue our investigation of the developmental stages of writing today. In this lesson, we'll focus on the strings of letter stage and the beginning sounds stage. This is where students begin to explore writing with confidence, which is why we call these students explorers! And as we did in the last lesson, we'll pop into our kindergarten class and resource room to see how our teachers work with students in these two stages.

Growing Risk-takers

What does it mean to be a risk-taker? When it comes to writing, our young risk-takers are ready to make bold choices when they put their pens to the paper. Today we'll look at these two developmental stages: consonants represent words and initial, middle, and final sounds. We'll continue to see students increase their knowledge of sound to letters, learn how to incorporate vowels, and expand the details in their writing. And we'll discuss strategies you can use to help your students achieve this success!

Growing Butterflies

Today we'll explore the final two stages of developmental writing: transitional and standard spelling. The standard spelling stage is our goal for all students, although they'll always be works in progress as they move toward this goal. We'll learn ways to grow these budding butterflies, and we'll visit some classrooms to see teachers in action.

Writer's Workshop

There are many different ways to hold successful writer's workshops! And this will be our focus for this lesson: examining the writer's workshop as a tool to meet the diverse needs of all of our writers. We'll investigate the three components of a successful writer's workshop: the mini-lesson, writing time, and sharing time. And we'll visit with some of our teachers to see how they implement a writer's workshop and incorporate it into their curriculum!

The Six Traits of Writing

What does great writing look like? There's no easy answer to this question, of course. And that's just what we're going to discuss in today's lesson—how to define and teach the traits of great writing. The method we'll review in this lesson is called the six traits of writing. These traits consist of ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. We'll talk about how to teach these skills to writers at every developmental stage—and as usual, we'll visit some classrooms to see our teachers working with this method in action!

Conferencing With Students

In this lesson, we'll be discussing writing conferences. We'll talk about the different types of conferences and how to conduct effective conferences with students at varying developmental levels. We'll also examine rubrics and how to use them to assess student writing. And as always, we'll visit some of our writing coaches to see them working with students in action.

Navigating Roadblocks

So far, we've talked about the traits of good writing and helping students at different developmental stages. But what do we do to help those students who struggle with some of the physical aspects of writing? In this lesson, we'll talk about navigating roadblocks such as trouble with fine motor skills, posture, and stamina. We'll also discuss specific tactics for reversing letter reversals!

Getting Into Genres

Today's lesson is all about genres! We'll look at narrative, expository, procedural, persuasive, and transactional writing. First, we'll discuss how genre study motivates students and increases their writing and reading comprehension skills. Next, we'll carefully examine the components of each genre and how to support our young writers as they write in each of them. And finally, we'll see how our teachers incorporate these genres into their classroom instruction.

Teamwork Gets It "Write": Building the Home-School Connection

We're going to spend our final lesson discussing how to work with parents to support their young writers at home. We'll talk about how to have productive conferences with parents about their children's writing, and we'll examine answers to some common (and often tough!) parent questions. We'll also discuss a great activity you can organize for your students and their parents: Family Writing Night!

Course 10 - Certificate in Speed Reading: Merrill Ream Online Course

Introduction
On this first day of class, you'll read a story to evaluate your present reading rate. You'll learn how many words per minute you read now, and then we'll compare that number to what percent of the reading material you're really comprehending. You'll also get an opportunity to check out the speed reading accomplishments of some of my former students. Then, you'll complete an eye-span exercise to start you on the path toward becoming a speed reader!

Reading Against Time
In this lesson, you'll practice some basic reading eye movements and learn how they're important to the speed reading process. Then, you'll take a reading rate and comprehension test. Your results will give you a baseline that you can use to chart your speed reading progress in this course, lesson-by-lesson. From there, you can set goals to increase you reading rate while maintaining a good reading comprehension.

Speed Reading Activities
By now, you might feel that the activities you're using to master your speed reading skills are becoming routine and repetitive. So today, we'll talk about how and why you should continue doing the Regulated Reading, Timed Reading, and Assignment exercises to gain increased reading rates with good reading comprehension. Finally, you'll read some stories that are formatted to help you improve your speed.

Setting Goals
Today, we'll examine the retinal image phenomena and how it relates to a speed reader's eye movements. Speed reading is a skill that's best achieved by doing repetitive practice, so we'll continue working on those exercises that are helping you to improve your speed.

Overcoming Poor Reading Habits
You'll probably find it helpful to work on lesson activities in the same comfortable and familiar surroundings. In this lesson, we'll talk about eight bad reading habits that contribute to slow reading, then we'll explore how to overcome them. Finally, we'll review some terminology that's unique to speed reading.

Sixteen Good Speed Reading Practices
In this lesson, we'll look at 16 good speed reading practices you can apply to our course exercises and any other reading you do outside of class. We're at the midpoint in the course, so this is also a good time to compare your reading rate and comprehension scores with those of the former students you read about in Lesson 1. From there, we'll set goals for you to meet in the remaining lessons.

Skimming Techniques
You'll probably be reading pretty quickly by the time you reach this lesson, but how can you make sure your comprehension scores are keeping up? Today, we'll look at skills you'll need to work on to improve your comprehension. You'll find out what keys and identified parts are unique to all stories, and knowing those will help you to improve your comprehension. You'll be glad to learn that you already know a few speed reading skills and techniques as we continue to apply them to our course activities.

Measuring Reading Rates
Today, you'll practice speed reading skills and techniques in real-world reading materials outside of class. You'll learn a method you can use to measure your speed reading rates when you're reading such materials. At this point, you'll be eager to read outside materials, not just for their content, but to further develop your speed reading skills and techniques.

Speed Reading Styles
We're now ready to analyze your personal speed reading style. You'll once again compare your speed reading rate and comprehension scores with those of former students in Lesson 1 to see how you stack up against others. We'll also compare your current scores with the scores you recorded at the beginning of the course to see how far you've come!

Vocabulary and Comprehension Skills
Today, we'll look at eight word recognition vocabulary skills that you can work into your personal speed reading style. You'll learn how context clues and literal and inferential meanings in stories influence comprehension. All are part of the English language and fit right in with speed reading.

Assessing Your Progress
Today, we'll see if we can figure out which of your behavior patterns are most useful in your own speed reading style. First and foremost, you need flexibility to focus on improving your reading speed, then you need an experimental attitude to get rid of poor reading habits. We'll study how the time you put in and the effort you expend affect your speed reading progress.

Wrapping Up
In our last lesson, we'll look at your personal speed reading accomplishments, as well as your speed reading future. Form here on out, you're in the real world of reading. But you'll go into it with a lifelong speed reading skill. You'll learn how to adjust your personal speed reading style to any materials you read, because now you are a speed reader!

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

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Course Summary

Course ID No.: 007una10CB
Delivery Mode: Online
Course Access: 6-8 Weeks Per Course
Time required: 240 Hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

Start Dates

This course is available to begin on the following dates

  • 17 July
  • 14 August
  • 11 September
  • 16 October

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