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How to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your ESL classroom


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How to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your ESL classroom

An Introduction to Teaching ESL/EFL

Would you like to increase your effectiveness as an English language teacher? Would you like to go beyond the well-known methods that often leave teachers frustrated with their one-size-fits-all approach? This course will take you on a fascinating exploration of what it means to be a teacher, how to understand who your students are and the needs they have, and how to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your classroom. You'll learn how you can choose and fine-tune the principles that exactly fit your teaching situation.

During the next six weeks, we'll rethink the traditional native vs. non-native speaker distinction, see why teaching English is so different from teaching other subjects, and explore innovative approaches like Communicative Language Teaching and the lexical approach. You'll gain new insights and ideas for teaching vocabulary, grammar, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You'll also discover what some of your options are in designing fair and accurate tests. And you'll learn how to keep learning and growing throughout your teaching career. Also, students who successfully complete this course will receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion.

So join us on this journey of becoming a more reflective and effective English language teacher!

Course materials are developed by Heinle I Cengage Learning, a global leader in ESL/EFL materials. Course content is approved by the TESOL Professional Development Committee so students who successfully complete this course receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion.  

Teaching ESL/EFL Vocabulary

Do you sometimes wonder if the vocabulary your textbook is teaching is really what your ESL students need to learn? Well, you're not alone. Many teachers long to have a more precise and effective way of helping their students learn English vocabulary, and in this course, I'll show you how.

Over the next six weeks, you'll discover what the different types of vocabulary are, as well as how to accurately assess what your students already know and what they need to learn. You'll also explore the most powerful way of teaching vocabulary as you teach ESL: across the four strands. These four strands include meaning-focused input (listening and reading), meaning-focused output (speaking and writing), language-focused (deliberate) learning, and fluency development.

You may be surprised to learn that you don't need to devote class time to all the types of vocabulary. Instead, you're better off teaching your students learning strategies with certain categories, and you'll get to fully delve into what these are too.

In addition, you'll find ways to evaluate how successful your vocabulary activities are, see how to teach vocabulary with content-based instruction, and explore how to monitor your students' learning. By the end of this course, you'll understand what makes a well-balanced vocabulary course and how to design one of your own!

Course materials are developed by Heinle I Cengage Learning, a global leader in ESL/EFL materials. Course content is approved by the TESOL Professional Development Committee so students who successfully complete this course receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion. 

Teaching ESL/EFL Grammar

In this course, you'll come to see English grammar as a three-dimensional process that's useful in bringing coherence, cohesion, and texture to writing and speech. We'll begin by considering seven definitions of grammar that we'll draw on throughout the course. We'll also discuss the differences between patterns and rules, and why second-language learners benefit from our instruction on both.

You'll learn why students need to understand the three dimensions of grammar—form, meaning, and use—and how seeing grammar as a dynamic and changing system helps students overcome many of their grammar challenges. You'll also see why teaching grammar in a way that makes it personally meaningful to your students brings the best results.

And since teaching isn't just about presenting lessons, we'll also go over the importance of "reading" your students—observing them to try to figure out what learning process they're using. We'll contrast rote or mechanical practice with meaningful practice, and we'll go over guidelines for creating activities and adapting your textbook exercises to get students working on the unique learning challenge presented by each different grammatical structure.

Toward the end of the course, we'll talk about what specific errors students make can indicate, and how they can help us pinpoint the unique challenges our students face so we can develop meaningful practice activities to help them meet those challenges. And we'll finish up the course by discussing ways that you can give valuable feedback to your students. Get ready to discover how to teach grammar in a way that's both effective and enjoyable for your students!

Course materials are developed by Heinle I Cengage Learning, a global leader in ESL/EFL materials. Course content is approved by the TESOL Professional Development Committee so students who successfully complete this course receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion.

Teaching ESL/EFL Reading

Did you realize that reading is one of the most important skills you can teach? The skill of reading not only gives your students what they need to be successful learners, but it also makes them more self-confident and eager to learn their whole life long. It's truly at the core of the other language skills—listening, speaking, writing, and grammar. In this course, you'll learn how to show your students the value of reading to motivate them to become strong readers.

Together, we'll explore the core skills of intensive reading. Then we'll examine extensive reading and how to integrate it into your curriculum. Next, we'll cover ways to bring vocabulary teaching into your reading classroom. You'll find out the difference between teaching comprehension and merely testing on it. They're not the same!

We'll also look at ways to help your students develop a fluent reading rate and use strategies for reading successfully. And we'll round out our time together by discussing how to plan effective lessons, design a strong reading curriculum, select appropriate reading materials, and assess students to encourage their growth.

If you would like to pass a passion for reading on to your students, then this is the course for you!

Course Fast Facts:

  • Learn Certificate in Teaching ESL Series in only 24 to 32 weeks
  • Approximately only 2 to 4 hours per week of study is required
  • This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  • Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  • You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  • You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  • You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Course I: Introduction to Teaching ESL/EFL

There are 12 units of study

What Is English and English Language Teaching?

The English language is everywhere—in music and movies, classrooms and airports, newspapers and e-mail. It's the language of both Shakespeare and Hollywood. So everyone knows what English is . . . or do they? Is it British, American, Canadian, or Australian? Is it harder to learn than other languages? In our first lesson, we'll explore the native vs. non-native distinction people often make about English speakers. We'll also look at how teaching English is different from teaching other subjects. And finally, we'll see which aspects of memory are most helpful in learning a language.

What Is Teaching?

What exactly is teaching? Have you given much thought to what kinds of roles you play in the classroom? Well, today you will! Teachers have many roles, including lesson planner, friend, authority, coach, assessor, and role model, just to name a few. In this lesson, you'll reflect on the different roles you play in the classroom, the role of English language teaching in your curriculum and community, and what factors should shape your particular style. After this lesson, you might agree that the best answer to, "What exactly is teaching?" is, "It depends!"

Who Are You Teaching?

As an English teacher, you naturally want to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your classroom. But how do you do this? First, you must answer the most important question of all: Who are you teaching? In this lesson, you'll think about the faces you see every day in your classroom. Are they younger or older? What life experiences and intellectual abilities do they bring with them? Why do they want to learn English? All these variables will impact how you teach, shaping your approach and the activities you choose. One thing's for sure: It's really not English we're teaching, but students.

What Have Been Some Popular Methods?

In this lesson, we'll take a look at some of the many methods people have used over the years to teach foreign languages. Some are hundreds of years old, while others are fairly new on the scene. As you'll see, though, all of them suffer from certain limitations. Are they useless to us then? Not at all. Today we'll explore how, even though the methods themselves may not help us much, we can still gain a lot from understanding the ideas that led to their creation.

What Is Principled English Language Teaching?

If methods are too limiting, what can you use to guide you in your teaching? In this lesson, we'll focus on general principles that can guide your choice of classroom activities whatever your situation may be. You'll learn about Communicative Language Teaching, as well as a number of principles that experts have developed along the way. Of course, you're not limited to what others have done. Instead, you'll discover ways to select or even develop your own principles. And you'll find the freedom to choose the principles that are relevant to your teaching situation and let go of those that aren't.

How Do You Teach Vocabulary?

How do we define what a word is? By its spelling? By its pronunciation? By its dictionary meaning? As teachers of the English language, words are our stock-in-trade. We must teach vocabulary, because a language is made of its words. But we can't really teach the true meaning of words if we teach them in isolation and out of context. In this lesson, we'll look at several types of meaning you need to be aware of and explore some techniques for teaching vocabulary items in the most helpful way.

How Do You Teach Grammar?

No other aspect of language teaching is more misunderstood and disliked than grammar! Like it or not, though, grammar is the linguistic glue that holds words together. In this lesson, we'll look at interesting ways to teach grammar, including using listening, the lexical approach, the top-down approach, and context. These approaches will not only be useful and relevant, but they might even make grammar exciting for your students to learn!

How Do You Teach Listening and Speaking?

Listening and speaking come so naturally in our first language that it might seem hard to believe that we actually need to teach these skills in a second language. Natural or not, these two skills are exceedingly complex, and each demands special approaches and techniques. In this lesson, we'll look at how these skills differ, and then we'll examine ways to help students improve their listening comprehension and speaking abilities.

How Do You Teach Reading?

The majority of English learners around the world need to learn reading the most, yet this skill is probably taught the least. In this lesson, we'll look at different writing and spelling systems, the problems that come with the irregularities of English, and different types of reading skills. We'll also examine teaching techniques like skimming, scanning, and transcoding that can help students improve their reading comprehension and speed.

How Do You Teach Writing?

Millions of people around the world can speak perfectly well but can't read or write in their own language. A person needs years of schooling to develop strong writing skills—and it's even more challenging to learn to write in a second language. So today, we'll review the characteristics of good writing, and you'll get some ideas about how to make learning this skill a little less daunting for your students.

How Do You Assess Your Students?

Have you ever met a student who really likes to take tests? Probably not. And with all the work that goes into them, teachers like them even less! Yet we constantly need to assess, evaluate, and test to know what progress our students are making and where they may need help. In this lesson, you'll learn the key difference between mistakes and errors, get some ideas about how to offer correction, discover different types of tests, and see how to keep them fair, accurate, and relevant.

How Can You Become a More Reflective Teacher?

In our final lesson, we'll explore how to become more reflective and effective teachers. You'll learn how to become more expert and efficient, and you'll discover ways to gain insight into your vocation through watching and learning from other teachers, observing and evaluating yourself, and journaling. Finally, you'll see the great value in continuing your professional growth, becoming the great teacher you were meant to be!

 

Course II: Teaching ESL/EFL Vocabulary

There are 12 units of study

Where Do We Start?

Do you want to help your ESL/EFL students strengthen and expand their vocabulary? Then you've come to the right place! In this lesson, you'll discover where to start in the process. You'll get acquainted with the different types and levels of vocabulary, and you'll see how to discover just what vocabulary your students need to learn. You'll also learn ways to teach the words you're students will most need to know and how to handle the words they won't run into so often. There's a strategy to teaching vocabulary, and you'll start exploring it here!

What Makes a Balanced Course?

In today's lesson, you'll discover how to create a well-balanced vocabulary course. It involves balancing four strands: (1) meaning-focused input (listening and reading), (2) meaning-focused output (speaking and writing), (3) language-focused (or deliberate) learning, and (4) fluency development. You'll get a survey of each of these strands that will lay a solid foundation for exploring them in detail in the lessons that follow.

Strand 1: Meaning-Focused Input

There are two essential parts to the first strand of meaning-focused input: extensive reading and extensive listening. Today, we're going to dive into both of these, looking at their benefits and some of their challenges. You'll also learn about an essential resource that provides a wonderful foundation for vocabulary learning: graded readers.

Strand 2: Meaning-Focused Output

In today's lesson, we're going to look at some of the how-tos connected with the second strand: meaning-focused output. We'll concentrate mainly on speaking, because many teachers have a hard time picturing how they can teach their students vocabulary through a productive activity like speaking. But there's actually a lot you can do! You'll gain an understanding of how vocabulary learning takes place through negotiation and remembering. You'll get some springboard ideas that you can adapt into many different kinds of activities. And you'll see how to design your worksheets and speaking activities to maximize vocabulary learning.

Strand 3: Deliberate (Language-Focused) Learning

Deliberate, or language-focused, learning plays a very important role in any vocabulary course. It speeds up our students' rate of learning and helps them correct their own errors, and it makes our teaching even more effective. So in this lesson, we're going to look at some activities you can use with this important strand to help your students learn single words and multi-word units (like idioms and figures of speech).

Strand 4: Fluency Development

If your students can't use what they've learned, what real good is their knowledge? Today we're going to look at the strand that helps students be able to confidently use what they've learned: fluency. You'll see why it's so important to give 25% of your class time to fluency development and how you can do it with interesting and challenging listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities.

Vocabulary Strategies

The most effective way to help your students learn low-frequency vocabulary words is by equipping them with strategies. Today we're going to explore four of the most useful strategies: guessing from context, using word cards, analyzing word parts, and using the dictionary. With these strategies, you can put your students' learning in their control, helping them become effective and independent learners.

Academic and Technical Vocabulary

If you need to prepare your learners for high school or college, you'll need to equip them with two vital levels of vocabulary: academic and technical. But do you know how? In this lesson, you'll discover just what you need to do! To teach academic vocabulary, you'll use the very valuable Academic Word List (AWL) and teach it right across the four strands. With technical vocabulary, you'll provide your students with effective strategies for learning the words they need to know for their particular fields of study.

How Effective Are Your Vocabulary Activities?

How can you tell if your vocabulary activities are working well? That's the question we'll set about answering in today's lesson. We'll start by exploring the conditions that are necessary for our students to have deep and thoughtful learning. Then we'll look at two ways to analyze activities: through four questions, and through the involvement load hypothesis (this may sound scary, but it's really quite simple!). Finally, once we've see how to analyze activities, we'll discover how to improve them for maximum effectiveness.

Vocabulary in Content-Based Instruction

In today's lesson, we're going to explore some of the ways you can help your second-language learners cope with the vocabulary they'll be meeting in different content areas. Content-based instruction has two big challenges for your students: They not only have to learn about the subject, but they also have to learn the language to convey those content-matter ideas. We can make their learning load easier to bear by using well-constructed experience tasks, shared tasks, and guided tasks.

Assessing Vocabulary Knowledge

Do you know the most effective ways of testing your students' vocabulary knowledge? That's what we'll be exploring today. In this lesson, we're going to tackle the following questions: What is our purpose for testing? What are the features of a good vocabulary test? What are the types of tests we can choose from? What aspects of vocabulary do we want to test on? By the time we're done, you'll find the answers to these - and a lot more!

Designing a Vocabulary Course

In our last lesson, we're going to explore a model that will help you in the course design process. You'll learn about what to look for when you analyze your students' needs and the classroom environment. And you'll also see how to incorporate important language-learning principles into your course. Goals are at the heart of design, so we'll be looking at those too. And you'll see how all of these areas can guide you when you choose your course content, decide on the teaching sequence, select your lesson format and presentation, and determine how to monitor and assess your students. And we'll wrap up by looking at how and why you should evaluate your course's effectiveness

 

Course III: Teaching ESL/EFL Grammar

There are 12 units of study

Defining Grammar

Grammar is an incredibly rich system for making meaning in a language. It's a subject that many people misunderstand, though, and that's something we should all be concerned about because if we don't see fully how grammar contributes to communication, then our students won't either. When students misunderstand grammar, they'll often develop a negative attitude toward studyinggrammar. We'll begin this first lesson by considering seven definitions of grammar, and we'll draw on all seven of these definitions later in this course. We'll also discuss the differences between patterns and rules, and why second-language learners benefit from our instruction on both patterns and the rules in the classroom.

The Three Dimensions of Grammar

Many people think of grammar structures as forms in a language. For instance, one form instructs us to place an s at the end of a noun if we want to make that noun plural. While there are indeed grammatical forms such as the plural s, there's more to grammar than form! In this lesson, you'll learn that grammar structures have meanings, and they have uses as well. This is very important to understand because grammar doesn't relate only to accuracy. It also relates to meaningfulness and appropriateness. We often teach grammar as forms that have meaning, but students don't often understand when or why to use particular structures. They wind up overusing them, under using them, or using them inappropriately. Students need to understand that there are three dimensions of grammar—form, meaning, and use—and that's what we'll discuss in today's lesson.

Grammaring

The title of this lesson is GrammaringGrammar + -ing. If you haven't heard the term before, don't be surprised. I coined it myself because I think adding the ing helps people understand that grammar isn't a fixed system of unchanging rules. On the contrary, grammatical rules and patterns change all the time! In this lesson, we'll talk about three ways that grammar is dynamic and changing. We'll also consider a long-time problem in language learning—the inert knowledge problem, where students appear to have learned something in class but can't use it outside of class for their own purposes. Finally, we'll talk about helping students overcome the inert knowledge problem by viewing grammar as a dynamic system and teaching it in a psychologically authentic way.

The Discourse Level of Grammar

When you think about grammar, you might think about rules that apply to sentences. Such rules might tell us the order of words in a phrase or in a sentence. But grammar goes beyond the sentence, too. Think about the sentences in a paragraph. There's an order they must follow to make sense, and grammar is what helps you to organize them! Today you'll learn the ways that people can use grammar to bring cohesion, coherence, and texture to what they're saying and writing. In the process, grammar helps to create organized wholes from written sentences and spoken utterances. Knowing how to create an organized whole out of sentences and utterances is very important for ESL and EFL students so they can learn to write and speak in a comprehensible way.

Lexicogrammar

Often people make a clear division between grammar structures and words. Grammar structures are patterns or formulas with open slots where the words go—it's up to you to add words to that structure. In this lesson, however, you'll see that grammar structures and words are actually interconnected. For one thing, the slots in certain grammatical patterns aren't really open, waiting for just any old word to fill them in. They can only be filled by particular words. Plus, certain grammar structures have characteristics that put them into the category of words, and some words have characteristics that would equally qualify them as grammar structures. So they can go either way as words or grammar structures. We'll talk about all of it in this lesson about lexicogrammar!

Reasons and Rules

If I asked you what you associate with the term "grammar," what would you say? I bet you'd say "rules." It's probably the most common association with grammar. Grammar rules are important in both language learning and teaching. I've taught grammar rules, and perhaps you have, too. I wouldn't want to do anything to discourage you from teaching rules. But in today's lesson, I hope to convince you that grammar has underlying reasons as well as rules. Reasons help you understand why rules are the way they are. Grammar isn't as arbitrary as you may have thought. You don't always have to tell your students, "That's just the way it is." Reasons will also help you understand the so-called "exceptions" to rules. Besides, reasons are broader than rules. If you understand a single reason, you'll understand a number of rules. Now, that sounds like a bargain, doesn't it?

The Challenge Principle

One of the problems that all teachers face is lack of time. There's never enough time to teach all you want your students to learn. You have to be selective. Now, you may be thinking selection becomes more difficult with a grammaring approach. After all, you've learned by now in this course that grammar is more complex than you may have thought. But in today's lesson, you'll learn an important principle as well. It's called the challenge principle. It's a principle for selecting what it is that you need to spend time on with your students. The challenge principle says that you should spend time focusing on the dimension of grammar that students find most challenging—it could be form, or meaning, or use. In this lesson, you'll learn how to apply the challenge principle to determine an instructional focus.

Learning Grammar

Teaching isn't only about presenting lessons. A large part of being a good teacher is "reading" your students. By "reading" your students, I mean observing them while they're learning—trying to figure out what learning process they're using. You'll also see that students have their own goals for what they want to learn and their own strategies for how they'll meet these goals. In this lesson, you'll learn about some of the learning processes that students use to grasp grammar. You'll also see that different students approach learning grammar in different ways. By the end of this lesson, you'll have acquired the knowledge what you need to be a better observer and manager of your students' learning. And, believe me; watching your students learn is one of the very special rewards of teaching!

Approaches to Teaching Grammar

In this lesson, we'll examine three different approaches to teaching grammar. We'll start with the traditional 3-P approach: present, practice, and produce—present a grammar structure, practice it, and then have your students produce it. We'll then contrast this traditional approach with a more recent proposal to focus on form within a communicative approach. I'll also talk about my grammaring approach. As you know by now, I believe that we need to teach grammar in a more dynamic fashion in order to overcome the inert knowledge problem. And my goal in this lesson is to convince you of that, too!

Implicit and Explicit Teaching of Grammar

We can make a number of contrasts between learning grammar in your native language and learning grammar in another language. One of the important differences is that in learning your native language, you learn from experience—you learn implicitly. Second language learners, on the other hand, often learn grammar explicitly—by following explicit rules and explanations. In this lesson, I'll contrast the two—implicit learning and teaching, and explicit learning and teaching. We'll also discuss the important question about using grammatical terminology while you're teaching grammar. Using grammar terms can be useful to students, but let's not to lose sight of the fact that what we're trying to do is to help them achieve an ability to use grammar—not necessarily turn them into grammarians.

Creating Practice Activities to Teach Grammar

By now, you know that I believe that learning grammar should be an active process. The capacity to use grammar structures actively requires practice. In this lesson, we'll start off by contrasting rote or mechanical practice with meaningful practice. When people think of grammatical practice, they often think of drills. But today, you'll find out how to create meaningful practice activities that address the form, meaning, and use challenges in learning grammar. With these guidelines, you'll be able to create activities and adapt your textbook exercises so that your students are working on the unique learning challenge presented by each different grammatical structure. You can make your teaching process much more effective this way.

Errors and Feedback

With this lesson, we'll conclude our course. But we can't do that without taking up the important issue of giving feedback to our students, and that's the focus of this lesson. We'll start off by talking about what an error is. Recognizing what is and what isn't an error might not always be easy. Then, once we're satisfied that we've defined and detected an error, we'll need to go over what to do about it. This is actually a controversial area! I'll try to help by suggesting what sort of feedback students find most useful. Errors are also important windows into learners' minds—we can actually learn quite a lot from our learners' errors! You may find it amusing that one of the final questions we'll consider in this course has to do with learning. As you've no doubt seen throughout this course, I consider learning—learning about grammar, learning from our students, learning from each other—to be at the heart of good grammar teaching. So we'll conclude with a wish for the joy of learning.

 

Course IV: Teaching ESL/EFL Reading

There are 12 units of study

The Importance of Reading 

Just how important is reading in English language learning? I believe it's the most important skill, and by the end of this lesson, I think you will too! Today you'll discover how central reading is to all the other language skills: listening, speaking, writing, and grammar. You'll also explore ways to help your students and administrators become convinced of reading's value. And you'll learn about four things you can do to become a more effective reading teacher.

Motivation

How can you help motivate your students to read? This is a challenge for any teacher, but it can be especially tricky for English language teachers. In this lesson, you'll get some ideas about how you can determine your students' motivation level. You'll also explore a model for motivation, and you'll discover 10 strategies for motivating, engaging, and inspiring your students.

The Foundations of L1 and L2 Reading

In today's lesson, you'll become aware of the key issues that go into first and second language literacy for both children and adults. You'll learn about the important roles that phonemic awareness and phonics play in a child's learning. And you'll discover four vital factors involved in adults learning to read in English. We'll also explore the bilingual classroom and see its many benefits.

Intensive Reading

Have you ever wanted to spend focused time on certain reading skills with your students? Well, that's one of the many things intensive reading will allow you to do. Today you'll learn what intensive reading is and why it's so important. You'll also get a list of 29 reading skills you can choose from, as well as add to! And you'll get to explore several effective ways to teach these skills to your students and help them become strong and independent readers of English.

Extensive Reading

Would you like your students to build the habit of reading? To be something they'll enjoy—for a lifetime? The most effective way you can make reading be its own reward for your students is to teach them extensive reading. In today's lesson, you'll discover 10 characteristics of extensive reading, why it's so valuable, and how you can select appropriate reading materials. You'll also get some tips for making sure that your students are indeed learning, and you'll see how you can integrate extensive reading into your overall reading curriculum.

Vocabulary

Building your students' vocabulary involves a lot more than teaching them single words. In this lesson, you'll discover what else goes into it, and you'll uncover several myths connected with teaching it. I think you'll find some surprises here! You'll also understand how helpful high-frequency word lists can be to you, and you'll get to explore some activities that will spark your own ideas for teaching vocabulary.

Teaching Comprehension Skills

Do you realize that we often spend more time testing reading comprehension than on teaching our students how to understand what they're reading? It's essential for us to teach our learners how to think like good readers. So in this lesson, you'll explore four tools for developing your students' reading comprehension: think-aloud protocols, Questioning the Author (QtA), graphic organizers, and Justify Your Comprehension. It's all about making thinking visible!

Reading Rate

What is reading fluency? It's a combination of both comprehension and reading rate. Too often, we emphasize accuracy at the expense of reading rate. But you know what? The slower our students read, the less they'll really understand. In today's lesson, you'll discover what an optimal reading rate is, and you'll get the chance to explore three activities that will increase your students' reading speed and improve their comprehension. The result? More confident, fluent, and engaged readers!

Teaching Reading Strategies

In today's lesson, you'll learn the important difference between a reading strategy and a reading skill. You'll also get seven how-to's for teaching strategies, including using strategy clusters, strategy surveys, and strategy questions. With these tools at your fingertips, you'll help your students become more perceptive and successfully readers!

Lesson Planning

You can tie effective teaching directly to the planning and preparation you do. In this lesson, you'll see why you can't automatically default to a textbook for your lesson plan. You'll also discover the seven steps for successful lesson planning, including how to integrate other language skills into a reading lesson and how to create truly helpful objectives. We'll also explore how to sequence your lesson's activities and how to know if you and your students have met your objectives. I hope you'llplan to join us for this lesson!

Selecting Appropriate Materials

How can you choose a textbook that will meet your students' needs and help them meet their goals? That's what you'll learn in today's lesson! You'll begin by seeing what goes into designing a strong reading curriculum. Then you'll get 12 criteria for evaluating a textbook—whether you're selecting it or reviewing it. You'll also discover how to use a book's scope and sequence to help your students get familiar with the text they'll be using. And you'll come away with new ideas for supplementing your text with real-world resources.

Testing Reading Skills

In this lesson, we'll wrap up our course by looking at three different kinds of tests: formative, summative, and standardized. You'll discover how formative testing, or assessment, lets you give your students ongoing feedback so they can continually improve their performance. Plus, it will help you hone your teaching approach so you can better set your students up for success. You'll also explore how to write good summative tests, basing them solidly on your course objectives. Finally, you'll get some ideas for how to help your students prepare for standardized tests, especially the TOEFL and IELTS.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Adobe PDF plug - in ( a free download obtained at Adobe.com)

Email

Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in these courses gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. They have the flexibility to study at their own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. And they can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

New sessions of each course run every month. They last six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor facilitates every course; pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions.

About this Course

How to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your ESL classroom

An Introduction to Teaching ESL/EFL

Would you like to increase your effectiveness as an English language teacher? Would you like to go beyond the well-known methods that often leave teachers frustrated with their one-size-fits-all approach? This course will take you on a fascinating exploration of what it means to be a teacher, how to understand who your students are and the needs they have, and how to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your classroom. You'll learn how you can choose and fine-tune the principles that exactly fit your teaching situation.

During the next six weeks, we'll rethink the traditional native vs. non-native speaker distinction, see why teaching English is so different from teaching other subjects, and explore innovative approaches like Communicative Language Teaching and the lexical approach. You'll gain new insights and ideas for teaching vocabulary, grammar, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You'll also discover what some of your options are in designing fair and accurate tests. And you'll learn how to keep learning and growing throughout your teaching career. Also, students who successfully complete this course will receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion.

So join us on this journey of becoming a more reflective and effective English language teacher!

Course materials are developed by Heinle I Cengage Learning, a global leader in ESL/EFL materials. Course content is approved by the TESOL Professional Development Committee so students who successfully complete this course receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion.  

Teaching ESL/EFL Vocabulary

Do you sometimes wonder if the vocabulary your textbook is teaching is really what your ESL students need to learn? Well, you're not alone. Many teachers long to have a more precise and effective way of helping their students learn English vocabulary, and in this course, I'll show you how.

Over the next six weeks, you'll discover what the different types of vocabulary are, as well as how to accurately assess what your students already know and what they need to learn. You'll also explore the most powerful way of teaching vocabulary as you teach ESL: across the four strands. These four strands include meaning-focused input (listening and reading), meaning-focused output (speaking and writing), language-focused (deliberate) learning, and fluency development.

You may be surprised to learn that you don't need to devote class time to all the types of vocabulary. Instead, you're better off teaching your students learning strategies with certain categories, and you'll get to fully delve into what these are too.

In addition, you'll find ways to evaluate how successful your vocabulary activities are, see how to teach vocabulary with content-based instruction, and explore how to monitor your students' learning. By the end of this course, you'll understand what makes a well-balanced vocabulary course and how to design one of your own!

Course materials are developed by Heinle I Cengage Learning, a global leader in ESL/EFL materials. Course content is approved by the TESOL Professional Development Committee so students who successfully complete this course receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion. 

Teaching ESL/EFL Grammar

In this course, you'll come to see English grammar as a three-dimensional process that's useful in bringing coherence, cohesion, and texture to writing and speech. We'll begin by considering seven definitions of grammar that we'll draw on throughout the course. We'll also discuss the differences between patterns and rules, and why second-language learners benefit from our instruction on both.

You'll learn why students need to understand the three dimensions of grammar—form, meaning, and use—and how seeing grammar as a dynamic and changing system helps students overcome many of their grammar challenges. You'll also see why teaching grammar in a way that makes it personally meaningful to your students brings the best results.

And since teaching isn't just about presenting lessons, we'll also go over the importance of "reading" your students—observing them to try to figure out what learning process they're using. We'll contrast rote or mechanical practice with meaningful practice, and we'll go over guidelines for creating activities and adapting your textbook exercises to get students working on the unique learning challenge presented by each different grammatical structure.

Toward the end of the course, we'll talk about what specific errors students make can indicate, and how they can help us pinpoint the unique challenges our students face so we can develop meaningful practice activities to help them meet those challenges. And we'll finish up the course by discussing ways that you can give valuable feedback to your students. Get ready to discover how to teach grammar in a way that's both effective and enjoyable for your students!

Course materials are developed by Heinle I Cengage Learning, a global leader in ESL/EFL materials. Course content is approved by the TESOL Professional Development Committee so students who successfully complete this course receive a TESOL Certificate of Completion.

Teaching ESL/EFL Reading

Did you realize that reading is one of the most important skills you can teach? The skill of reading not only gives your students what they need to be successful learners, but it also makes them more self-confident and eager to learn their whole life long. It's truly at the core of the other language skills—listening, speaking, writing, and grammar. In this course, you'll learn how to show your students the value of reading to motivate them to become strong readers.

Together, we'll explore the core skills of intensive reading. Then we'll examine extensive reading and how to integrate it into your curriculum. Next, we'll cover ways to bring vocabulary teaching into your reading classroom. You'll find out the difference between teaching comprehension and merely testing on it. They're not the same!

We'll also look at ways to help your students develop a fluent reading rate and use strategies for reading successfully. And we'll round out our time together by discussing how to plan effective lessons, design a strong reading curriculum, select appropriate reading materials, and assess students to encourage their growth.

If you would like to pass a passion for reading on to your students, then this is the course for you!

Course Fast Facts:

  • Learn Certificate in Teaching ESL Series in only 24 to 32 weeks
  • Approximately only 2 to 4 hours per week of study is required
  • This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  • Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  • You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  • You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  • You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Course I: Introduction to Teaching ESL/EFL

There are 12 units of study

What Is English and English Language Teaching?

The English language is everywhere—in music and movies, classrooms and airports, newspapers and e-mail. It's the language of both Shakespeare and Hollywood. So everyone knows what English is . . . or do they? Is it British, American, Canadian, or Australian? Is it harder to learn than other languages? In our first lesson, we'll explore the native vs. non-native distinction people often make about English speakers. We'll also look at how teaching English is different from teaching other subjects. And finally, we'll see which aspects of memory are most helpful in learning a language.

What Is Teaching?

What exactly is teaching? Have you given much thought to what kinds of roles you play in the classroom? Well, today you will! Teachers have many roles, including lesson planner, friend, authority, coach, assessor, and role model, just to name a few. In this lesson, you'll reflect on the different roles you play in the classroom, the role of English language teaching in your curriculum and community, and what factors should shape your particular style. After this lesson, you might agree that the best answer to, "What exactly is teaching?" is, "It depends!"

Who Are You Teaching?

As an English teacher, you naturally want to choose the most appropriate materials and activities for your classroom. But how do you do this? First, you must answer the most important question of all: Who are you teaching? In this lesson, you'll think about the faces you see every day in your classroom. Are they younger or older? What life experiences and intellectual abilities do they bring with them? Why do they want to learn English? All these variables will impact how you teach, shaping your approach and the activities you choose. One thing's for sure: It's really not English we're teaching, but students.

What Have Been Some Popular Methods?

In this lesson, we'll take a look at some of the many methods people have used over the years to teach foreign languages. Some are hundreds of years old, while others are fairly new on the scene. As you'll see, though, all of them suffer from certain limitations. Are they useless to us then? Not at all. Today we'll explore how, even though the methods themselves may not help us much, we can still gain a lot from understanding the ideas that led to their creation.

What Is Principled English Language Teaching?

If methods are too limiting, what can you use to guide you in your teaching? In this lesson, we'll focus on general principles that can guide your choice of classroom activities whatever your situation may be. You'll learn about Communicative Language Teaching, as well as a number of principles that experts have developed along the way. Of course, you're not limited to what others have done. Instead, you'll discover ways to select or even develop your own principles. And you'll find the freedom to choose the principles that are relevant to your teaching situation and let go of those that aren't.

How Do You Teach Vocabulary?

How do we define what a word is? By its spelling? By its pronunciation? By its dictionary meaning? As teachers of the English language, words are our stock-in-trade. We must teach vocabulary, because a language is made of its words. But we can't really teach the true meaning of words if we teach them in isolation and out of context. In this lesson, we'll look at several types of meaning you need to be aware of and explore some techniques for teaching vocabulary items in the most helpful way.

How Do You Teach Grammar?

No other aspect of language teaching is more misunderstood and disliked than grammar! Like it or not, though, grammar is the linguistic glue that holds words together. In this lesson, we'll look at interesting ways to teach grammar, including using listening, the lexical approach, the top-down approach, and context. These approaches will not only be useful and relevant, but they might even make grammar exciting for your students to learn!

How Do You Teach Listening and Speaking?

Listening and speaking come so naturally in our first language that it might seem hard to believe that we actually need to teach these skills in a second language. Natural or not, these two skills are exceedingly complex, and each demands special approaches and techniques. In this lesson, we'll look at how these skills differ, and then we'll examine ways to help students improve their listening comprehension and speaking abilities.

How Do You Teach Reading?

The majority of English learners around the world need to learn reading the most, yet this skill is probably taught the least. In this lesson, we'll look at different writing and spelling systems, the problems that come with the irregularities of English, and different types of reading skills. We'll also examine teaching techniques like skimming, scanning, and transcoding that can help students improve their reading comprehension and speed.

How Do You Teach Writing?

Millions of people around the world can speak perfectly well but can't read or write in their own language. A person needs years of schooling to develop strong writing skills—and it's even more challenging to learn to write in a second language. So today, we'll review the characteristics of good writing, and you'll get some ideas about how to make learning this skill a little less daunting for your students.

How Do You Assess Your Students?

Have you ever met a student who really likes to take tests? Probably not. And with all the work that goes into them, teachers like them even less! Yet we constantly need to assess, evaluate, and test to know what progress our students are making and where they may need help. In this lesson, you'll learn the key difference between mistakes and errors, get some ideas about how to offer correction, discover different types of tests, and see how to keep them fair, accurate, and relevant.

How Can You Become a More Reflective Teacher?

In our final lesson, we'll explore how to become more reflective and effective teachers. You'll learn how to become more expert and efficient, and you'll discover ways to gain insight into your vocation through watching and learning from other teachers, observing and evaluating yourself, and journaling. Finally, you'll see the great value in continuing your professional growth, becoming the great teacher you were meant to be!

 

Course II: Teaching ESL/EFL Vocabulary

There are 12 units of study

Where Do We Start?

Do you want to help your ESL/EFL students strengthen and expand their vocabulary? Then you've come to the right place! In this lesson, you'll discover where to start in the process. You'll get acquainted with the different types and levels of vocabulary, and you'll see how to discover just what vocabulary your students need to learn. You'll also learn ways to teach the words you're students will most need to know and how to handle the words they won't run into so often. There's a strategy to teaching vocabulary, and you'll start exploring it here!

What Makes a Balanced Course?

In today's lesson, you'll discover how to create a well-balanced vocabulary course. It involves balancing four strands: (1) meaning-focused input (listening and reading), (2) meaning-focused output (speaking and writing), (3) language-focused (or deliberate) learning, and (4) fluency development. You'll get a survey of each of these strands that will lay a solid foundation for exploring them in detail in the lessons that follow.

Strand 1: Meaning-Focused Input

There are two essential parts to the first strand of meaning-focused input: extensive reading and extensive listening. Today, we're going to dive into both of these, looking at their benefits and some of their challenges. You'll also learn about an essential resource that provides a wonderful foundation for vocabulary learning: graded readers.

Strand 2: Meaning-Focused Output

In today's lesson, we're going to look at some of the how-tos connected with the second strand: meaning-focused output. We'll concentrate mainly on speaking, because many teachers have a hard time picturing how they can teach their students vocabulary through a productive activity like speaking. But there's actually a lot you can do! You'll gain an understanding of how vocabulary learning takes place through negotiation and remembering. You'll get some springboard ideas that you can adapt into many different kinds of activities. And you'll see how to design your worksheets and speaking activities to maximize vocabulary learning.

Strand 3: Deliberate (Language-Focused) Learning

Deliberate, or language-focused, learning plays a very important role in any vocabulary course. It speeds up our students' rate of learning and helps them correct their own errors, and it makes our teaching even more effective. So in this lesson, we're going to look at some activities you can use with this important strand to help your students learn single words and multi-word units (like idioms and figures of speech).

Strand 4: Fluency Development

If your students can't use what they've learned, what real good is their knowledge? Today we're going to look at the strand that helps students be able to confidently use what they've learned: fluency. You'll see why it's so important to give 25% of your class time to fluency development and how you can do it with interesting and challenging listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities.

Vocabulary Strategies

The most effective way to help your students learn low-frequency vocabulary words is by equipping them with strategies. Today we're going to explore four of the most useful strategies: guessing from context, using word cards, analyzing word parts, and using the dictionary. With these strategies, you can put your students' learning in their control, helping them become effective and independent learners.

Academic and Technical Vocabulary

If you need to prepare your learners for high school or college, you'll need to equip them with two vital levels of vocabulary: academic and technical. But do you know how? In this lesson, you'll discover just what you need to do! To teach academic vocabulary, you'll use the very valuable Academic Word List (AWL) and teach it right across the four strands. With technical vocabulary, you'll provide your students with effective strategies for learning the words they need to know for their particular fields of study.

How Effective Are Your Vocabulary Activities?

How can you tell if your vocabulary activities are working well? That's the question we'll set about answering in today's lesson. We'll start by exploring the conditions that are necessary for our students to have deep and thoughtful learning. Then we'll look at two ways to analyze activities: through four questions, and through the involvement load hypothesis (this may sound scary, but it's really quite simple!). Finally, once we've see how to analyze activities, we'll discover how to improve them for maximum effectiveness.

Vocabulary in Content-Based Instruction

In today's lesson, we're going to explore some of the ways you can help your second-language learners cope with the vocabulary they'll be meeting in different content areas. Content-based instruction has two big challenges for your students: They not only have to learn about the subject, but they also have to learn the language to convey those content-matter ideas. We can make their learning load easier to bear by using well-constructed experience tasks, shared tasks, and guided tasks.

Assessing Vocabulary Knowledge

Do you know the most effective ways of testing your students' vocabulary knowledge? That's what we'll be exploring today. In this lesson, we're going to tackle the following questions: What is our purpose for testing? What are the features of a good vocabulary test? What are the types of tests we can choose from? What aspects of vocabulary do we want to test on? By the time we're done, you'll find the answers to these - and a lot more!

Designing a Vocabulary Course

In our last lesson, we're going to explore a model that will help you in the course design process. You'll learn about what to look for when you analyze your students' needs and the classroom environment. And you'll also see how to incorporate important language-learning principles into your course. Goals are at the heart of design, so we'll be looking at those too. And you'll see how all of these areas can guide you when you choose your course content, decide on the teaching sequence, select your lesson format and presentation, and determine how to monitor and assess your students. And we'll wrap up by looking at how and why you should evaluate your course's effectiveness

 

Course III: Teaching ESL/EFL Grammar

There are 12 units of study

Defining Grammar

Grammar is an incredibly rich system for making meaning in a language. It's a subject that many people misunderstand, though, and that's something we should all be concerned about because if we don't see fully how grammar contributes to communication, then our students won't either. When students misunderstand grammar, they'll often develop a negative attitude toward studyinggrammar. We'll begin this first lesson by considering seven definitions of grammar, and we'll draw on all seven of these definitions later in this course. We'll also discuss the differences between patterns and rules, and why second-language learners benefit from our instruction on both patterns and the rules in the classroom.

The Three Dimensions of Grammar

Many people think of grammar structures as forms in a language. For instance, one form instructs us to place an s at the end of a noun if we want to make that noun plural. While there are indeed grammatical forms such as the plural s, there's more to grammar than form! In this lesson, you'll learn that grammar structures have meanings, and they have uses as well. This is very important to understand because grammar doesn't relate only to accuracy. It also relates to meaningfulness and appropriateness. We often teach grammar as forms that have meaning, but students don't often understand when or why to use particular structures. They wind up overusing them, under using them, or using them inappropriately. Students need to understand that there are three dimensions of grammar—form, meaning, and use—and that's what we'll discuss in today's lesson.

Grammaring

The title of this lesson is GrammaringGrammar + -ing. If you haven't heard the term before, don't be surprised. I coined it myself because I think adding the ing helps people understand that grammar isn't a fixed system of unchanging rules. On the contrary, grammatical rules and patterns change all the time! In this lesson, we'll talk about three ways that grammar is dynamic and changing. We'll also consider a long-time problem in language learning—the inert knowledge problem, where students appear to have learned something in class but can't use it outside of class for their own purposes. Finally, we'll talk about helping students overcome the inert knowledge problem by viewing grammar as a dynamic system and teaching it in a psychologically authentic way.

The Discourse Level of Grammar

When you think about grammar, you might think about rules that apply to sentences. Such rules might tell us the order of words in a phrase or in a sentence. But grammar goes beyond the sentence, too. Think about the sentences in a paragraph. There's an order they must follow to make sense, and grammar is what helps you to organize them! Today you'll learn the ways that people can use grammar to bring cohesion, coherence, and texture to what they're saying and writing. In the process, grammar helps to create organized wholes from written sentences and spoken utterances. Knowing how to create an organized whole out of sentences and utterances is very important for ESL and EFL students so they can learn to write and speak in a comprehensible way.

Lexicogrammar

Often people make a clear division between grammar structures and words. Grammar structures are patterns or formulas with open slots where the words go—it's up to you to add words to that structure. In this lesson, however, you'll see that grammar structures and words are actually interconnected. For one thing, the slots in certain grammatical patterns aren't really open, waiting for just any old word to fill them in. They can only be filled by particular words. Plus, certain grammar structures have characteristics that put them into the category of words, and some words have characteristics that would equally qualify them as grammar structures. So they can go either way as words or grammar structures. We'll talk about all of it in this lesson about lexicogrammar!

Reasons and Rules

If I asked you what you associate with the term "grammar," what would you say? I bet you'd say "rules." It's probably the most common association with grammar. Grammar rules are important in both language learning and teaching. I've taught grammar rules, and perhaps you have, too. I wouldn't want to do anything to discourage you from teaching rules. But in today's lesson, I hope to convince you that grammar has underlying reasons as well as rules. Reasons help you understand why rules are the way they are. Grammar isn't as arbitrary as you may have thought. You don't always have to tell your students, "That's just the way it is." Reasons will also help you understand the so-called "exceptions" to rules. Besides, reasons are broader than rules. If you understand a single reason, you'll understand a number of rules. Now, that sounds like a bargain, doesn't it?

The Challenge Principle

One of the problems that all teachers face is lack of time. There's never enough time to teach all you want your students to learn. You have to be selective. Now, you may be thinking selection becomes more difficult with a grammaring approach. After all, you've learned by now in this course that grammar is more complex than you may have thought. But in today's lesson, you'll learn an important principle as well. It's called the challenge principle. It's a principle for selecting what it is that you need to spend time on with your students. The challenge principle says that you should spend time focusing on the dimension of grammar that students find most challenging—it could be form, or meaning, or use. In this lesson, you'll learn how to apply the challenge principle to determine an instructional focus.

Learning Grammar

Teaching isn't only about presenting lessons. A large part of being a good teacher is "reading" your students. By "reading" your students, I mean observing them while they're learning—trying to figure out what learning process they're using. You'll also see that students have their own goals for what they want to learn and their own strategies for how they'll meet these goals. In this lesson, you'll learn about some of the learning processes that students use to grasp grammar. You'll also see that different students approach learning grammar in different ways. By the end of this lesson, you'll have acquired the knowledge what you need to be a better observer and manager of your students' learning. And, believe me; watching your students learn is one of the very special rewards of teaching!

Approaches to Teaching Grammar

In this lesson, we'll examine three different approaches to teaching grammar. We'll start with the traditional 3-P approach: present, practice, and produce—present a grammar structure, practice it, and then have your students produce it. We'll then contrast this traditional approach with a more recent proposal to focus on form within a communicative approach. I'll also talk about my grammaring approach. As you know by now, I believe that we need to teach grammar in a more dynamic fashion in order to overcome the inert knowledge problem. And my goal in this lesson is to convince you of that, too!

Implicit and Explicit Teaching of Grammar

We can make a number of contrasts between learning grammar in your native language and learning grammar in another language. One of the important differences is that in learning your native language, you learn from experience—you learn implicitly. Second language learners, on the other hand, often learn grammar explicitly—by following explicit rules and explanations. In this lesson, I'll contrast the two—implicit learning and teaching, and explicit learning and teaching. We'll also discuss the important question about using grammatical terminology while you're teaching grammar. Using grammar terms can be useful to students, but let's not to lose sight of the fact that what we're trying to do is to help them achieve an ability to use grammar—not necessarily turn them into grammarians.

Creating Practice Activities to Teach Grammar

By now, you know that I believe that learning grammar should be an active process. The capacity to use grammar structures actively requires practice. In this lesson, we'll start off by contrasting rote or mechanical practice with meaningful practice. When people think of grammatical practice, they often think of drills. But today, you'll find out how to create meaningful practice activities that address the form, meaning, and use challenges in learning grammar. With these guidelines, you'll be able to create activities and adapt your textbook exercises so that your students are working on the unique learning challenge presented by each different grammatical structure. You can make your teaching process much more effective this way.

Errors and Feedback

With this lesson, we'll conclude our course. But we can't do that without taking up the important issue of giving feedback to our students, and that's the focus of this lesson. We'll start off by talking about what an error is. Recognizing what is and what isn't an error might not always be easy. Then, once we're satisfied that we've defined and detected an error, we'll need to go over what to do about it. This is actually a controversial area! I'll try to help by suggesting what sort of feedback students find most useful. Errors are also important windows into learners' minds—we can actually learn quite a lot from our learners' errors! You may find it amusing that one of the final questions we'll consider in this course has to do with learning. As you've no doubt seen throughout this course, I consider learning—learning about grammar, learning from our students, learning from each other—to be at the heart of good grammar teaching. So we'll conclude with a wish for the joy of learning.

 

Course IV: Teaching ESL/EFL Reading

There are 12 units of study

The Importance of Reading 

Just how important is reading in English language learning? I believe it's the most important skill, and by the end of this lesson, I think you will too! Today you'll discover how central reading is to all the other language skills: listening, speaking, writing, and grammar. You'll also explore ways to help your students and administrators become convinced of reading's value. And you'll learn about four things you can do to become a more effective reading teacher.

Motivation

How can you help motivate your students to read? This is a challenge for any teacher, but it can be especially tricky for English language teachers. In this lesson, you'll get some ideas about how you can determine your students' motivation level. You'll also explore a model for motivation, and you'll discover 10 strategies for motivating, engaging, and inspiring your students.

The Foundations of L1 and L2 Reading

In today's lesson, you'll become aware of the key issues that go into first and second language literacy for both children and adults. You'll learn about the important roles that phonemic awareness and phonics play in a child's learning. And you'll discover four vital factors involved in adults learning to read in English. We'll also explore the bilingual classroom and see its many benefits.

Intensive Reading

Have you ever wanted to spend focused time on certain reading skills with your students? Well, that's one of the many things intensive reading will allow you to do. Today you'll learn what intensive reading is and why it's so important. You'll also get a list of 29 reading skills you can choose from, as well as add to! And you'll get to explore several effective ways to teach these skills to your students and help them become strong and independent readers of English.

Extensive Reading

Would you like your students to build the habit of reading? To be something they'll enjoy—for a lifetime? The most effective way you can make reading be its own reward for your students is to teach them extensive reading. In today's lesson, you'll discover 10 characteristics of extensive reading, why it's so valuable, and how you can select appropriate reading materials. You'll also get some tips for making sure that your students are indeed learning, and you'll see how you can integrate extensive reading into your overall reading curriculum.

Vocabulary

Building your students' vocabulary involves a lot more than teaching them single words. In this lesson, you'll discover what else goes into it, and you'll uncover several myths connected with teaching it. I think you'll find some surprises here! You'll also understand how helpful high-frequency word lists can be to you, and you'll get to explore some activities that will spark your own ideas for teaching vocabulary.

Teaching Comprehension Skills

Do you realize that we often spend more time testing reading comprehension than on teaching our students how to understand what they're reading? It's essential for us to teach our learners how to think like good readers. So in this lesson, you'll explore four tools for developing your students' reading comprehension: think-aloud protocols, Questioning the Author (QtA), graphic organizers, and Justify Your Comprehension. It's all about making thinking visible!

Reading Rate

What is reading fluency? It's a combination of both comprehension and reading rate. Too often, we emphasize accuracy at the expense of reading rate. But you know what? The slower our students read, the less they'll really understand. In today's lesson, you'll discover what an optimal reading rate is, and you'll get the chance to explore three activities that will increase your students' reading speed and improve their comprehension. The result? More confident, fluent, and engaged readers!

Teaching Reading Strategies

In today's lesson, you'll learn the important difference between a reading strategy and a reading skill. You'll also get seven how-to's for teaching strategies, including using strategy clusters, strategy surveys, and strategy questions. With these tools at your fingertips, you'll help your students become more perceptive and successfully readers!

Lesson Planning

You can tie effective teaching directly to the planning and preparation you do. In this lesson, you'll see why you can't automatically default to a textbook for your lesson plan. You'll also discover the seven steps for successful lesson planning, including how to integrate other language skills into a reading lesson and how to create truly helpful objectives. We'll also explore how to sequence your lesson's activities and how to know if you and your students have met your objectives. I hope you'llplan to join us for this lesson!

Selecting Appropriate Materials

How can you choose a textbook that will meet your students' needs and help them meet their goals? That's what you'll learn in today's lesson! You'll begin by seeing what goes into designing a strong reading curriculum. Then you'll get 12 criteria for evaluating a textbook—whether you're selecting it or reviewing it. You'll also discover how to use a book's scope and sequence to help your students get familiar with the text they'll be using. And you'll come away with new ideas for supplementing your text with real-world resources.

Testing Reading Skills

In this lesson, we'll wrap up our course by looking at three different kinds of tests: formative, summative, and standardized. You'll discover how formative testing, or assessment, lets you give your students ongoing feedback so they can continually improve their performance. Plus, it will help you hone your teaching approach so you can better set your students up for success. You'll also explore how to write good summative tests, basing them solidly on your course objectives. Finally, you'll get some ideas for how to help your students prepare for standardized tests, especially the TOEFL and IELTS.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Adobe PDF plug - in ( a free download obtained at Adobe.com)

Email

Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in these courses gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. They have the flexibility to study at their own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. And they can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

New sessions of each course run every month. They last six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor facilitates every course; pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions.

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  • How to have faith in yourself.
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  • 12 month online access,  24/7 anywhere.
  • Complement your individual course purchase.
  • Internationally recognized by the IAOTS.
  • Thousands of positive reviews.
  • Limited Time Offer - Ends Soon.
 

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Course Summary

Course ID No.: 007TESLS
Delivery Mode: Online
Course Access: 24 to 32 weeks
Tutor Support: Yes
Time required: 96 hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

Start Dates

This course is available to begin on the following dates

  • 17 July
  • 14 August
  • 11 September
  • 16 October

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