Human Physiology Online Bundle, 2 Certificate Courses

Learn everything from cell anatomy to human genetics


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Learn Everything from Cell Anatomy to Human Geneticss

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

In this online anatomy course we'll discuss everything from cell anatomy to human genetics to functions of the different organ systems. Each lesson includes information about specific disorders that sometimes happen to our bodies, and we'll also talk about some recent advances in medicine. By the end of this course, you'll have a greater appreciation and understanding of the marvelous complexity of the human body!

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

In this course, we'll cover some more advanced topics that we didn't have time for in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. We’ll cover histology, how the brain processes senses, cellular metabolism, and even pregnancy and childbirth.

Course Fast Facts:

  • Learn Certificate in Human Physiology Series in only 12 - 16 weeks
  • Approximately only 2 to 4 hours per week of study is required
  • This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  • Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  • You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  • You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  • You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete a Courses For Success online course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Course I: Human Anatomy and Physiology I

There are 12 units of study

Introduction to the Living Processes
Our first lesson will introduce you to the fascinating subject of human anatomy and physiology. Since chemical reactions drive all of our bodies' functions, we'll start by reviewing some basic chemistry. Then we'll discuss how the human body is organized and the four main types of molecules it contains. We'll even touch on a little history because humans used to have some pretty funny ideas about living organisms. Later, you'll learn why a living human being is so different from one who's died. Finally, we'll discuss homeostasis—that drive we have to keep many different variables (like temperature and blood pressure) within a narrow range. By the time you're done with this lesson, you'll be ready to learn more about the structure and function of our bodies.

The Human Cell
The smallest living unit of the body is the cell, and it's so amazing, it deserves a lesson of its own. Even though almost all cells are microscopic, they're jam-packed with many different kinds of organelles and surrounded by complex membranes. I think you'll be amazed at their complexity as we discuss their different functions. We'll also talk about how cells reproduce, and we'll finish up with a discussion on cancer—which is cell reproduction gone amok. 

Understanding Heredity
In this lesson, we'll tackle the subject of heredity. It's probably the most technical of all the lessons because we'll be exploring genetics. You'll learn how genes determine your physical and mental characteristics, and how your parents' genetic material determine these traits. You'll learn the important differences between reproductive cells and all of the other cells in the body. Then we'll spend some time talking about a man who lived in the 1800's—Gregor Mendel, the Father of Genetics—because his insights paved the way for our modern understanding of heredity. After that, we'll discuss some different genetic disorders as you learn about specific mutations in the genetic code that can cause problems. 

The Nervous System
We'll move on to the organ systems in today's lesson. We'll start with the one I find most interesting—the nervous system. You'll learn how it's organized, its different jobs, and the structures that make thinking, feeling, and moving possible. You'll also learn how the nervous system works when we think we're in danger or we've suddenly been affected by physical pain. We'll use our knowledge about chemistry in this chapter, too, as we talk about how nervous impulses are transmitted. Finally, we'll talk about some disorders of the nervous system—what causes them and their effects.

The Skeletal System
Our bones have several functions, and some aren't so obvious. For example, did you know that red blood cells are made in your bones? Or that bones store minerals that are essential for the function of your nerves and muscles? In today's lesson on the skeletal system, we'll explore the structure and function of bones, and then we'll talk about different types of joints and the amazing structure of your spinal column. You'll learn about some common disorders of this system and what you can do to keep your bones strong. 

The Muscular System
Like the skeletal system, the muscular system is crucial for movement, but it has other functions, too. We'll discuss them in detail in today's lesson. Muscles are also a lot more complicated than they appear, so we'll spend some time talking about both the structures that we can see and the structures that we can't see without a microscope. We'll go over some of the specific muscles in the body and how they work together to perform specific movements. You'll also learn why even simple movements involve chemical reactions and a close coordination between this system and the nervous system. In the last chapter, we'll look at several common injuries to different parts of the muscular system. 

The Respiratory System
We'll focus on the respiratory system in this lesson. As you're probably aware, it's the group of organs that allow you to get that crucial substance—oxygen—to all the cells in our body. But your respiratory system has some other functions that we'll touch on in this lesson. You'll learn about the anatomy of your respiratory organs and which muscles are crucial for breathing. You'll also become aware of the differences between ventilation, external respiration, internal respiration, and cellular respiration. And we'll talk about some illnesses that could affect your respiratory system, compromising your ability to breathe. 

The Circulatory System
There's so much to learn about the circulatory system! In this lesson, we'll explore the composition of blood, the various blood cells, and the different kinds of blood vessels in your body. Of course, the heart is a crucial part of the circulatory system, so we'll talk about its chambers, valves, coronary vessels, and electrical system. You'll learn how blood travels around the body and its important functions. We'll spend some time on two of the most common health problems people experience—high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. You'll finish this lesson knowing the importance of taking care of this organ system. 

The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease
In today's very interesting lesson, you'll learn all about the disease-fighting ability of your body. Did you know that your body is constantly bombarded with germs that want to make you sick? We'll talk about that in this lesson, as well as some of the many ways your body fights back to keep you well. The human body also has a system of vessels (similar to blood vessels) called the lymphatic system. We'll talk about its disease-fighting role as well as some of its other functions. You'll learn about some of the other organs in your body that are involved in the battle against disease. At the end of this lesson, we'll talk about different ways the body's disease-fighting ability can be compromised and why sometimes the body turns on its own cells. 

The Integumentary and Urinary System
Today we'll take a close look at two different organ systems—the integumentary system (the skin) and the urinary system. Both of these systems work to get rid of waste products that would kill you if they were allowed to build up in your body. You'll learn, too, how important these two systems are in maintaining homeostasis. We'll spend quite a bit of time on the structure of these two systems. People are often surprised to learn how complex even the skin can be. And the structures of the urinary system, particularly the kidneys, are quite amazing. At the end of this lesson, you'll learn about kidney failure and the challenges of dialysis and kidney transplantation.

The Digestive System
You'll never think about food the same way again after this lesson on the digestive system! Just writing about it made me want to be a bit more careful about what I eat. You'll learn about all the different structures involved with converting food into the chemicals our bodies need to grow, repair tissues, and carry on all the functions of life. We'll also discuss the role of the three main types of foods and the importance of many different vitamins and minerals. When you finish this lesson, you'll understand the value of eating a variety of foods and how good food choices will enhance your health. We'll spend some time discussing two common digestive disorders, and then we'll talk about one of the most common kinds of cancer—colon cancer.

The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems
We'll end this course with a discussion about the endocrine and reproductive systems. You'll learn how the endocrine and nervous systems work together to regulate all of your body's functions. We'll discuss some specific endocrine glands, the hormones they produce, and how they influence each other. Homeostasis again becomes something important to talk about because of the crucial role of the endocrine system. We'll also cover both the female and male reproductive systems. You'll learn about their anatomy and how the endocrine system affects their organs, making reproduction possible. We'll end this chapter with a discussion about two fairly common disorders—diabetes and endometriosis.

 

Course II: Human Anatomy and Physiology II

There are 12 units of study

The Four Types of Tissues

In our first lesson, you'll learn about the four major types of tissues—epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous tissue. We'll go over their major characteristics, how they're named, their functions, and where they're located. You'll discover some hints on identifying some specific tissues with a microscope, and I'll explain why every organ in your body contains all four major types of tissues.

Cutaneous Sensation

In this lesson, we'll explore the topic of sensation as you learn about the sensations of touch, pressure, temperature, and pain. You'll discover the differences between free nerve endings, Merkel disks, Meissner corpuscles, root hair plexuses, and Pacinian corpuscles. We'll also talk about sensory adaptation and referred pain, and you'll learn where in the brain messages from sensory receptors end up. We'll end the lesson with a discussion of three disorders of cutaneous sensation—tactile defensiveness, congenital insensitivity to pain, and peripheral neuropathy.

The Senses of Proprioception and Equilibrium

Today, you'll learn about sensory receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs, and joint proprioceptors) that tell your brain how much tension is in your muscles and the position of your body parts. You'll learn why accurate information from these receptors is so important and how the brain uses their information to help you plan your movements. We'll also discuss the sense of equilibrium—that sense that lets you know if you're upright and if you're in danger of falling. You'll study the structures of the vestibular system and learn how they contribute to both static and dynamic equilibrium. I'll summarize this lesson by telling you what happens when a person experiences proprioceptive or vestibular dysfunction.

The Sense of Vision

Now it's time to learn about the physics of light and color and find out how light is bent and focused. Today, you'll learn about the composition of the eyes, including their three coverings and the structures inside the eyeballs. We'll talk about special sensory receptors called rod and cones, and how information they receive is sent to the brain and analyzed. We'll end this lesson with a discussion about three common eye disorders—glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration.

The Sense of Hearing

In this lesson, you'll discover the physics of sound. You'll learn why sounds differ in pitch and loudness, and you'll find out about a quality of sound called color. We'll then talk about the different structures that make up the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. You'll learn what happens when sound waves enter the ear and how information from the ear travels to the brain for analysis. We'll end this lesson with a discussion of hearing loss.

The Senses of Smell and Taste

Today, we'll finish up our study of the senses with a discussion on the senses of smell and taste.  You’ll learn about the structures that respond to chemicals of smell and taste, and how the sensations of smell and taste are perceived in the brain.  We’ll also talk about disorders of both of these senses, and you’ll have an opportunity to perform a fun experiment to test the importance of smell to the perception of flavor.

Cellular Metabolism

In this lesson, we'll go over the fascinating topic of cellular metabolism—the chemical reactions that occur in your body’s cells. We’ll review the important concepts of homeostasis and negative feedback, and you’ll learn that homeostasis is maintained by thousands of chemical reactions that occur every second. Those chemical reactions either build larger molecules from smaller ones or break apart larger molecules into smaller ones, so we'll discuss what happens in those two major types of reactions. You’ll also learn about the capture and storage of energy, the role of enzymes in metabolic pathways, and disorders of cellular metabolism.

Water, Acids, Bases, and Salts

In today's lesson, we'll continue our study of important chemicals in the human body. We'll start out by reviewing the differences between atoms and ions, and the differences between ionic and covalent bonds. We'll then move on to a study of water, its unique properties, and its important functions. You'll learn that water breaks apart molecules called electrolytes, and that the three major types of electrolytes include acids, bases, and salts. We'll discuss the pH scale—a way to measure the degree of acidity in a substance, and you'll learn about the conditions called acidosis and alkalosis. We'll finish up the lesson with a discussion about imbalances of three important ions—sodium, potassium, and calcium.

Prenatal Development

Today, we'll go over the wonders of prenatal development. You’ll learn about the roles both men and women play in the creation of the zygote—the very first cell that starts a new human life. We’ll then follow that new creature through the amazing changes that happen during the first eight weeks after fertilization (the embryonic period). We’ll also discuss significant events that occur during the rest of the pregnancy (the fetal period). At the end of this lesson, I’ll tell you about some common causes of both male and female infertility.

Pregnancy, Childbirth, the Postpartum Period, and Breastfeeding

In this lesson, you'll learn about pregnancy from the mother's point of view. We'll start with a discussion about the placenta, and then we'll talk about the way pregnancy affects the mother's different organ systems. We'll also discuss the events of childbirth and what a mother experiences during the postpartum period. Many women choose to breastfeed (lactate), so I'll also tell you how breasts prepare for lactation, how milk is produced, and how it's secreted. We'll end this lesson with a discussion of a complication of pregnancy called gestational diabetes.

The Neonatal Period, Infancy, and Childhood

In today's lesson, we'll focus on the neonatal period, infancy, and childhood. We'll start with a discussion of normal circulation of blood in children and adults and compare that to circulation in the fetus. That's so you can understand the big changes that occur in the heart, blood vessels, and lungs as soon as a baby takes his first breath. We'll then talk about other changes in the first four weeks after birth (the neonatal period), and we'll move on to a discussion of reflexes and brain maturation during the first year and significant changes that occur during childhood. At the end of this lesson, you'll learn about a common developmental disorder in children called cerebral palsy.

Puberty, Adulthood, and Old Age

In our final lesson, we'll go over puberty, adulthood, and old age. You'll learn how hormones work during puberty and what physical changes occur during that time. We'll also discuss changes that occur during young adulthood and middle age and spend some time on menopause. I devote a chapter to the topic of senescence—the process of aging during the years 65 and over. In that chapter, you'll learn several reasons why getting older causes age-related changes. We'll end this lesson with a discussion of ways to slow down the aging process.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Adobe PDF plug - in ( a free download obtained at Adobe.com)

Email

Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in these courses gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. They have the flexibility to study at their own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. And they can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

New sessions of each course run every month. They last six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor facilitates every course; pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions.

About this Course

Learn Everything from Cell Anatomy to Human Geneticss

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

In this online anatomy course we'll discuss everything from cell anatomy to human genetics to functions of the different organ systems. Each lesson includes information about specific disorders that sometimes happen to our bodies, and we'll also talk about some recent advances in medicine. By the end of this course, you'll have a greater appreciation and understanding of the marvelous complexity of the human body!

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

In this course, we'll cover some more advanced topics that we didn't have time for in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. We’ll cover histology, how the brain processes senses, cellular metabolism, and even pregnancy and childbirth.

Course Fast Facts:

  • Learn Certificate in Human Physiology Series in only 12 - 16 weeks
  • Approximately only 2 to 4 hours per week of study is required
  • This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  • Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  • You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  • You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  • You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete a Courses For Success online course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Course I: Human Anatomy and Physiology I

There are 12 units of study

Introduction to the Living Processes
Our first lesson will introduce you to the fascinating subject of human anatomy and physiology. Since chemical reactions drive all of our bodies' functions, we'll start by reviewing some basic chemistry. Then we'll discuss how the human body is organized and the four main types of molecules it contains. We'll even touch on a little history because humans used to have some pretty funny ideas about living organisms. Later, you'll learn why a living human being is so different from one who's died. Finally, we'll discuss homeostasis—that drive we have to keep many different variables (like temperature and blood pressure) within a narrow range. By the time you're done with this lesson, you'll be ready to learn more about the structure and function of our bodies.

The Human Cell
The smallest living unit of the body is the cell, and it's so amazing, it deserves a lesson of its own. Even though almost all cells are microscopic, they're jam-packed with many different kinds of organelles and surrounded by complex membranes. I think you'll be amazed at their complexity as we discuss their different functions. We'll also talk about how cells reproduce, and we'll finish up with a discussion on cancer—which is cell reproduction gone amok. 

Understanding Heredity
In this lesson, we'll tackle the subject of heredity. It's probably the most technical of all the lessons because we'll be exploring genetics. You'll learn how genes determine your physical and mental characteristics, and how your parents' genetic material determine these traits. You'll learn the important differences between reproductive cells and all of the other cells in the body. Then we'll spend some time talking about a man who lived in the 1800's—Gregor Mendel, the Father of Genetics—because his insights paved the way for our modern understanding of heredity. After that, we'll discuss some different genetic disorders as you learn about specific mutations in the genetic code that can cause problems. 

The Nervous System
We'll move on to the organ systems in today's lesson. We'll start with the one I find most interesting—the nervous system. You'll learn how it's organized, its different jobs, and the structures that make thinking, feeling, and moving possible. You'll also learn how the nervous system works when we think we're in danger or we've suddenly been affected by physical pain. We'll use our knowledge about chemistry in this chapter, too, as we talk about how nervous impulses are transmitted. Finally, we'll talk about some disorders of the nervous system—what causes them and their effects.

The Skeletal System
Our bones have several functions, and some aren't so obvious. For example, did you know that red blood cells are made in your bones? Or that bones store minerals that are essential for the function of your nerves and muscles? In today's lesson on the skeletal system, we'll explore the structure and function of bones, and then we'll talk about different types of joints and the amazing structure of your spinal column. You'll learn about some common disorders of this system and what you can do to keep your bones strong. 

The Muscular System
Like the skeletal system, the muscular system is crucial for movement, but it has other functions, too. We'll discuss them in detail in today's lesson. Muscles are also a lot more complicated than they appear, so we'll spend some time talking about both the structures that we can see and the structures that we can't see without a microscope. We'll go over some of the specific muscles in the body and how they work together to perform specific movements. You'll also learn why even simple movements involve chemical reactions and a close coordination between this system and the nervous system. In the last chapter, we'll look at several common injuries to different parts of the muscular system. 

The Respiratory System
We'll focus on the respiratory system in this lesson. As you're probably aware, it's the group of organs that allow you to get that crucial substance—oxygen—to all the cells in our body. But your respiratory system has some other functions that we'll touch on in this lesson. You'll learn about the anatomy of your respiratory organs and which muscles are crucial for breathing. You'll also become aware of the differences between ventilation, external respiration, internal respiration, and cellular respiration. And we'll talk about some illnesses that could affect your respiratory system, compromising your ability to breathe. 

The Circulatory System
There's so much to learn about the circulatory system! In this lesson, we'll explore the composition of blood, the various blood cells, and the different kinds of blood vessels in your body. Of course, the heart is a crucial part of the circulatory system, so we'll talk about its chambers, valves, coronary vessels, and electrical system. You'll learn how blood travels around the body and its important functions. We'll spend some time on two of the most common health problems people experience—high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. You'll finish this lesson knowing the importance of taking care of this organ system. 

The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease
In today's very interesting lesson, you'll learn all about the disease-fighting ability of your body. Did you know that your body is constantly bombarded with germs that want to make you sick? We'll talk about that in this lesson, as well as some of the many ways your body fights back to keep you well. The human body also has a system of vessels (similar to blood vessels) called the lymphatic system. We'll talk about its disease-fighting role as well as some of its other functions. You'll learn about some of the other organs in your body that are involved in the battle against disease. At the end of this lesson, we'll talk about different ways the body's disease-fighting ability can be compromised and why sometimes the body turns on its own cells. 

The Integumentary and Urinary System
Today we'll take a close look at two different organ systems—the integumentary system (the skin) and the urinary system. Both of these systems work to get rid of waste products that would kill you if they were allowed to build up in your body. You'll learn, too, how important these two systems are in maintaining homeostasis. We'll spend quite a bit of time on the structure of these two systems. People are often surprised to learn how complex even the skin can be. And the structures of the urinary system, particularly the kidneys, are quite amazing. At the end of this lesson, you'll learn about kidney failure and the challenges of dialysis and kidney transplantation.

The Digestive System
You'll never think about food the same way again after this lesson on the digestive system! Just writing about it made me want to be a bit more careful about what I eat. You'll learn about all the different structures involved with converting food into the chemicals our bodies need to grow, repair tissues, and carry on all the functions of life. We'll also discuss the role of the three main types of foods and the importance of many different vitamins and minerals. When you finish this lesson, you'll understand the value of eating a variety of foods and how good food choices will enhance your health. We'll spend some time discussing two common digestive disorders, and then we'll talk about one of the most common kinds of cancer—colon cancer.

The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems
We'll end this course with a discussion about the endocrine and reproductive systems. You'll learn how the endocrine and nervous systems work together to regulate all of your body's functions. We'll discuss some specific endocrine glands, the hormones they produce, and how they influence each other. Homeostasis again becomes something important to talk about because of the crucial role of the endocrine system. We'll also cover both the female and male reproductive systems. You'll learn about their anatomy and how the endocrine system affects their organs, making reproduction possible. We'll end this chapter with a discussion about two fairly common disorders—diabetes and endometriosis.

 

Course II: Human Anatomy and Physiology II

There are 12 units of study

The Four Types of Tissues

In our first lesson, you'll learn about the four major types of tissues—epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous tissue. We'll go over their major characteristics, how they're named, their functions, and where they're located. You'll discover some hints on identifying some specific tissues with a microscope, and I'll explain why every organ in your body contains all four major types of tissues.

Cutaneous Sensation

In this lesson, we'll explore the topic of sensation as you learn about the sensations of touch, pressure, temperature, and pain. You'll discover the differences between free nerve endings, Merkel disks, Meissner corpuscles, root hair plexuses, and Pacinian corpuscles. We'll also talk about sensory adaptation and referred pain, and you'll learn where in the brain messages from sensory receptors end up. We'll end the lesson with a discussion of three disorders of cutaneous sensation—tactile defensiveness, congenital insensitivity to pain, and peripheral neuropathy.

The Senses of Proprioception and Equilibrium

Today, you'll learn about sensory receptors (muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs, and joint proprioceptors) that tell your brain how much tension is in your muscles and the position of your body parts. You'll learn why accurate information from these receptors is so important and how the brain uses their information to help you plan your movements. We'll also discuss the sense of equilibrium—that sense that lets you know if you're upright and if you're in danger of falling. You'll study the structures of the vestibular system and learn how they contribute to both static and dynamic equilibrium. I'll summarize this lesson by telling you what happens when a person experiences proprioceptive or vestibular dysfunction.

The Sense of Vision

Now it's time to learn about the physics of light and color and find out how light is bent and focused. Today, you'll learn about the composition of the eyes, including their three coverings and the structures inside the eyeballs. We'll talk about special sensory receptors called rod and cones, and how information they receive is sent to the brain and analyzed. We'll end this lesson with a discussion about three common eye disorders—glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration.

The Sense of Hearing

In this lesson, you'll discover the physics of sound. You'll learn why sounds differ in pitch and loudness, and you'll find out about a quality of sound called color. We'll then talk about the different structures that make up the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. You'll learn what happens when sound waves enter the ear and how information from the ear travels to the brain for analysis. We'll end this lesson with a discussion of hearing loss.

The Senses of Smell and Taste

Today, we'll finish up our study of the senses with a discussion on the senses of smell and taste.  You’ll learn about the structures that respond to chemicals of smell and taste, and how the sensations of smell and taste are perceived in the brain.  We’ll also talk about disorders of both of these senses, and you’ll have an opportunity to perform a fun experiment to test the importance of smell to the perception of flavor.

Cellular Metabolism

In this lesson, we'll go over the fascinating topic of cellular metabolism—the chemical reactions that occur in your body’s cells. We’ll review the important concepts of homeostasis and negative feedback, and you’ll learn that homeostasis is maintained by thousands of chemical reactions that occur every second. Those chemical reactions either build larger molecules from smaller ones or break apart larger molecules into smaller ones, so we'll discuss what happens in those two major types of reactions. You’ll also learn about the capture and storage of energy, the role of enzymes in metabolic pathways, and disorders of cellular metabolism.

Water, Acids, Bases, and Salts

In today's lesson, we'll continue our study of important chemicals in the human body. We'll start out by reviewing the differences between atoms and ions, and the differences between ionic and covalent bonds. We'll then move on to a study of water, its unique properties, and its important functions. You'll learn that water breaks apart molecules called electrolytes, and that the three major types of electrolytes include acids, bases, and salts. We'll discuss the pH scale—a way to measure the degree of acidity in a substance, and you'll learn about the conditions called acidosis and alkalosis. We'll finish up the lesson with a discussion about imbalances of three important ions—sodium, potassium, and calcium.

Prenatal Development

Today, we'll go over the wonders of prenatal development. You’ll learn about the roles both men and women play in the creation of the zygote—the very first cell that starts a new human life. We’ll then follow that new creature through the amazing changes that happen during the first eight weeks after fertilization (the embryonic period). We’ll also discuss significant events that occur during the rest of the pregnancy (the fetal period). At the end of this lesson, I’ll tell you about some common causes of both male and female infertility.

Pregnancy, Childbirth, the Postpartum Period, and Breastfeeding

In this lesson, you'll learn about pregnancy from the mother's point of view. We'll start with a discussion about the placenta, and then we'll talk about the way pregnancy affects the mother's different organ systems. We'll also discuss the events of childbirth and what a mother experiences during the postpartum period. Many women choose to breastfeed (lactate), so I'll also tell you how breasts prepare for lactation, how milk is produced, and how it's secreted. We'll end this lesson with a discussion of a complication of pregnancy called gestational diabetes.

The Neonatal Period, Infancy, and Childhood

In today's lesson, we'll focus on the neonatal period, infancy, and childhood. We'll start with a discussion of normal circulation of blood in children and adults and compare that to circulation in the fetus. That's so you can understand the big changes that occur in the heart, blood vessels, and lungs as soon as a baby takes his first breath. We'll then talk about other changes in the first four weeks after birth (the neonatal period), and we'll move on to a discussion of reflexes and brain maturation during the first year and significant changes that occur during childhood. At the end of this lesson, you'll learn about a common developmental disorder in children called cerebral palsy.

Puberty, Adulthood, and Old Age

In our final lesson, we'll go over puberty, adulthood, and old age. You'll learn how hormones work during puberty and what physical changes occur during that time. We'll also discuss changes that occur during young adulthood and middle age and spend some time on menopause. I devote a chapter to the topic of senescence—the process of aging during the years 65 and over. In that chapter, you'll learn several reasons why getting older causes age-related changes. We'll end this lesson with a discussion of ways to slow down the aging process.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Adobe PDF plug - in ( a free download obtained at Adobe.com)

Email

Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in these courses gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. They have the flexibility to study at their own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. And they can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

New sessions of each course run every month. They last six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor facilitates every course; pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions.

We provide a 7 Day Money Back Refund on all Courses

Now Only US$399 Save US$801 (67%)
OFF RRP US$1200
Delivery Method Online
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Special Offer

 

Receive The Personal Success Training Program FREE, When You Purchase This Course - Limited Time Remaining!  (Value $600)

 

The Personal Success Training Program Helps You Stay Focused To Achieve Your Goals!
Benefits:
  • How to layout a Success Plan.
  • Get where you want to be in life.
  • How to unclutter your mind to succeed.
  • Achieve your dreams using your imagination.
  • How to have faith in yourself.
Features:
  • 12 month online access,  24/7 anywhere.
  • Complement your individual course purchase.
  • Internationally recognized by the IAOTS.
  • Thousands of positive reviews.
  • Limited Time Offer - Ends Soon.
 

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Course Summary

Course ID No.: 007HPS
Delivery Mode: Online
Course Access: 12 - 16 weeks
Tutor Support: Yes
Time required: 48 hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

Start Dates

This course is available to begin on the following dates

  • 17 July
  • 14 August
  • 11 September
  • 16 October

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