Explore a Career in Healthcare Online Bundle, 3 Certificate Courses

Learn what it takes to have a successful career in healthcare


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Learn What it Takes to Have a Successful Career in Healthcare

Explore a Career in Medical Coding

Take your first step toward a lucrative career as a medical coder! In this course, you'll learn how to use the CPT manual and the ICD-10-CM to find medical codes for any disease, condition, treatment, or surgical procedure. This knowledge will help prepare you to work almost anywhere in the medical field—doctors' offices, clinics, public health facilities, hospitals, labs, nursing homes, insurance agencies, or even the comfort of your own home.

We'll go through each of the main systems of the human body—integumentary (skin), musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and male and female genitourinary—outlining the medical terminology, conditions, diseases, injuries, treatments, and procedures you'll see most often in each of those systems.

Along the way, we'll go through lots of real-world examples and coding exercises to get you using your coding tools in conjunction with your analytical skills to come up with just the right codes to describe any medical situation. In the process, you'll get all the hands-on experience you'll need to code medical insurance claims with confidence. By the end of this course, you'll know how to find your way through both the CPT manual and the ICD-10-CM manual, and you'll be well on your way to a career as a medical coder!

Explore a Career as an Administrative Medical Assistant

Learn what it takes to have a successful career as an administrative medical assistant in the exciting and high-demand world of healthcare.

In this course, you'll master the basics of scheduling patients' appointments, surgeries, and hospital admissions. In addition, you'll discover how to create, maintain, and file medical charts. You'll also find out how to verify patients' insurance, create encounter forms (charge tickets), post charges, obtain pre-authorizations from insurers, and schedule return visits.

After that, we'll go behind the scenes as you learn how to apply diagnostic and procedure codes to patients' accounts and bill their insurance companies. Next, we'll explore additional accounts receivable tasks including posting payments and adjustments, billing secondary insurance, and following up on unpaid insurance claims. You'll also learn what a day sheet is, why it's important, and how to keep track of all your patient accounts on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis.

Finally, we'll delve into the basics of keeping a medical office running smoothly—from ordering supplies to scheduling staff meetings and making travel arrangements.

If you're organized, you're a "people person," and you're interested in a secure job in the healthcare field, a career as an administrative medical assistant may be just what you're looking for. This course will set you on the path to that career and help you determine which aspect of medical information management—from patient contact to billing and coding—suits you best.

Explore a Career in Medical Transcription

Take your first step toward a lucrative career as a medical transcriptionist! In this course, you'll learn how to transcribe the most common medical reports used in both inpatient and outpatient settings. We'll review a lot of the grammar you might have forgotten since high school and apply it to the reports. This knowledge will help prepare you to work almost anywhere in the medical field—doctors' offices, clinics, public health facilities, and hospitals. With this foundation, you'll be set to advance your education so you can work as a subcontractor for a company that outsources transcription, or you can eventually even take on your own clients—all from the comfort of your own home.

We'll go through each of the nine main report types—their formatting requirements, the components of each one, and how they are used in the clinical setting. We'll review grammar points in every lesson, pointing out important elements that will make your reports perfect. You'll also gain important clinical knowledge of major disease processes that are essential to enhance your skill as a medical documentation specialist.

Along the way, we'll download a free transcriber that you'll use to listen to dictation, and we'll cover how to use it to produce the reports in your word processor. These hands-on exercises will give you the practice you'll need to determine if this field is for you. We'll also go through the options you'll have now and in the future by developing the skills of a medical transcriptionist. By the end of this course, you'll know the basic report types, have clinical knowledge of major diseases, be able to correct grammar from dictated reports on the fly, and know the next steps you'll need to take!

Course Fast Facts:

  • Learn Certificate in Explore a Career in Healthcare Suite in only 18 - 24 weeks
  • Approximately only 2 to 4 hours per week of study is required
  • This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  • Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  • You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  • You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  • You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Course I: Explore a Career in Medical Coding

There are 12 units of study

 Medical Coding Basics

In our first lesson, we'll explore the history of medical insurance and medical coding. After that, we'll take a few minutes to get familiar with the coding books and tools that medical coders use. We'll finish up the lesson with an important discussion about patient privacy and confidentiality.

Coding in the Real World

Today we'll take a close look at how medical professionals use medical codes in the real world. We'll get to know the common forms medical coders use and explore the different types of medical codes you'll find in your coding books. By the time you finish this lesson, you'll understand how the different types of codes come together on the claim form and how they tell the insurance company a complete story about any doctor-patient encounter.

Getting to Know Your CPT Manual

In this lesson, we'll take a detailed tour through the CPT manual where you'll find medical codes for the procedures and treatments doctors and other medical professionals provide their patients. You'll learn all about the CPT symbols, modifiers, and unlisted procedures. By the end of this lesson, you'll be looking up your first codes!

Getting to Know Your ICD-9-CM

Similar to our last lesson, today we'll take a detailed tour through the other coding book we'll use in this course, the ICD-9-CM, which is where you'll find the codes for any disease, illness, condition, or symptom that a patient may have. You'll learn all about the ICD-9-CM's symbols, formatting, and other conventions; and you'll learn where to find E-codes and V-codes. By the end of this lesson, you'll begin to practice coding diagnoses.

Coding the Integumentary System

Today we'll begin a series of lessons that will take us in depth into just one body system at a time so we can discuss specific medical coding situations for each area of the human body. In this lesson, we'll explore the integumentary (skin) system. We'll review the code categories for the most common skin conditions, infections, injuries, and procedures, and then we'll practice coding cases that involve common skin problems.

Coding the Musculoskeletal System

In this lesson, you'll learn all about the musculoskeletal system and study some important musculoskeletal vocabulary. We'll review the code categories for the most common muscle and bone conditions and injuries, and then you'll learn how to code the procedures doctors use to treat common muscle and bone problems.

Coding the Respiratory System

Today we'll review the respiratory system, and you'll learn how to code the most common respiratory conditions and injuries. After that, you'll practice coding the most common respiratory procedures that doctors use on their patients.

Coding the Cardiovascular System

We'll explore the cardiovascular system in today's lesson. You'll learn how to code common heart, vein, and artery conditions and diseases, and then you'll learn how to code the procedures doctors use most often to treat these common diagnoses. And as we always do, we'll follow up our general discussion on cardiovascular diseases and procedures with lots of coding practice.

Coding the Digestive and Endocrine Systems

In this lesson, you'll learn all about the digestive system and the endocrine system. We'll begin by studying some important vocabulary for both systems, and then we'll review the code categories for the most common conditions, diseases, and injuries. After that, we'll explore the procedures doctors perform to fix digestive and endocrine system problems. We'll end up the lesson with some practice coding both systems.

Coding the Male and Female Genitourinary Systems

In the last of our system-specific lessons, today we'll review the male and female genitourinary systems; and learn how to code common conditions, diseases, and procedures for both systems. We'll also spend some time discussing maternity and childbirth and the special medical coding challenges you'll need to consider in those cases

Evaluation and Management (E/M) Codes

Ready to get to know Evaluation and Management codes? Today, you'll learn the three key components of any E/M service, and I'll provide you with some helpful charts you can use to narrow down an E/M code range to a final E/M code. And as you probably guessed, we'll end up the lesson with plenty of E/M coding practice!

Surgical Packages and Modifiers

In our final lesson, you'll find out what's included in a surgical package and what's not. You'll also learn all about modifiers, and find out why medical coders use them to let insurance companies know about special circumstances. Finally, you'll put everything you've learned throughout the course together by coding some practice scenarios that incorporate all of the different types of codes!

 

Course II: Explore a Career as an Administrative Medical Assistant

There are 12 units of study

The Medical Office and Administrative Medical Assistant
Looking for a fun, challenging job that’s always in demand? If so, AMA (administrative medical assisting) may be just the field for you! In this lesson, we’ll look at the exciting job opportunities for AMAs, the variety of careers they can choose from, and the different settings where they can work.
 
Ethics, the Law, and HIPAA
The law and medicine go hand-in-hand—so today we’ll look at the laws you’ll want to know if you become an AMA. We’ll cover everything from contracts to malpractice, and delve into HIPAA (a federal act that affects everyone in the health care field). In addition, we’ll take a quick peek at ethics and medical office etiquette.
 
Computers and Office Equipment
Today we’ll explore the office equipment and computer hardware you’re likely to use as an AMA. In addition, we’ll delve into software—both standard office programs and the specialized software we use in the field of medical information management.

Filing Processes and Equipment
If you think filing is a bore, this lesson will change your mind. You’ll discover what the rainbow of colored stickers on a medical file means, and you’ll even practice creating a patient chart yourself. You’ll also find out why medical offices love lateral files, and you’ll master the tricky rules of alphabetizing. (Yes, it’s more challenging than it looks!)
 
Records Management
Now that you’re an expert on the outside of a patient chart, it’s time to look inside. Today you’ll find out which forms go in a medical record, and just where you’ll put each one. In addition, you’ll learn about two styles of note-taking: SOAP and CHEDDAR. And finally, you’ll delve into the topic of medical record audits and find out the legal way to correct a patient’s chart.

Appointment Scheduling, Check-In, and Check-Out
It’s time to introduce the star of our show: the patient. Today you’ll learn everything about what we call a patient encounter. We’ll start by talking about the phone skills you can use to make appointments, handle questions, and soothe angry callers. Next, we’ll flip open the appointment book and explore the tricks for scheduling patients easily and efficiently. And finally, we’ll follow a patient’s visit from start to finish, and see how many tasks an AMA does during that appointment.
 
Reception Area Tasks and Communication Skills
We’ll start this lesson in the waiting room, where you’ll learn more about the tasks a receptionist handles—from opening and closing a medical office to keeping the reception area ship-shape. After that, we’ll talk about some barriers to communicating effectively with patients, and you’ll discover ways to overcome them. We’ll end our lesson by looking at one of the fun and creative jobs that AMAs do: creating informational brochures and teaching aids.

Medical Insurance Basics
Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, commercial insurance—what does it all mean? In today’s lesson, you’ll find out! First, you’ll learn the meaning of terms like managed care, capitation, and fee-for-service.  Next, we’ll explore government programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Workers’ Compensation, and TRICARE. By the time you’re done, you’ll have a good feel for the many types of insurance an AMA handles every day.
 
The Medical Insurance Claim Form
Did you ever study an insurance claim form? If so, you know it contains dozens of mysterious questions and checkboxes. Well, today you’ll come face-to-face with one of these claim forms—and conquer it. By the end of our lesson, you’ll know how to fill in each field of the CMS-1500 claim form. In fact, you’ll even get to try it yourself!

Diagnostic Coding
Medical coding is a hot field for AMAs, so it’s a great specialty if you’re looking for job security. In today’s lesson, we’ll take a quick look at diagnostic coding and see why it’s both fun and challenging. We’ll take a tour through the ICD-9-CM, talk about the detective work involved in abstracting a diagnostic statement, and explore the steps of coding a diagnosis.

Procedural Coding
We’ll finish up our tour of medical coding today with an overview of procedural coding. First, you’ll learn all about a manual called the CPT and discover how to use it to code everything from surgeries to X-rays to acupuncture. After that, we’ll examine a second manual called the HCPCS (“hix-pix”), which contains codes for ambulances, root canals, and much more. We’ll also delve into anesthesia coding, a tricky but rewarding sub-specialty.

The Business Office
In our final lesson, we’ll visit the business office and talk about how AMAs keep track of the money coming in and going out. In addition, we’ll look at inventory control and supply ordering—two crucial jobs that help keep a medical office running smoothly. Finally, we’ll talk about managing a payroll and investigate several jobs that fall under the umbrella of human resources.

 

Course III: Explore a Career in Medical Transcription

There are 12 units of study

Introduction to Medical Transcription

In this first lesson, we'll look at the history of medical transcription as a career. You'll find out how the field has evolved into its modern form, and you'll explore the various skills and aptitudes that you'll need to succeed as a professional medical transcriptionist. You'll examine the type of work MTs produce, and we'll take a look at the MT's job today, where you might work, and what might be in store in the future for those working in this career field.

Tools of the Trade

We'll start today by discussing the MT's tools of the trade. We'll review a few of the reference books and discuss the types of Web sites that MTs use for research. Then we'll take a look at the hardware and software that today's MTs use on the job. I'll talk you through downloading the free software we'll use in this course, and then we'll go through a quick tour on how to use it. By the end of this lesson, you'll be sitting at your computer, listening to a real medical dictation audio file and looking at the Express Scribe software on your screen. As you listen to the medical report, you'll practice starting, pausing, and rewinding the audio as you tap away on the keyboard.

Understanding Medical Records

There are nine report types that medical professionals use most often in both hospitals and clinics. So in this lesson we'll go over a variety of examples of real medical reports. We'll also do a quick review of medical correspondence. Medical letters aren't much different from traditional letters, but since you might not have typed a traditional letter in a while, you might need a refresher. We'll finish the lesson with some specific tips about pathology reports and how to handle numbers and measurements. Then you'll practice transcribing a medical letter and a pathology report.

Listening Carefully

We'll spend this lesson going over how to listen most effectively, discussing the difference between hearing and active listening. We'll also touch on many of the issues that keep voice recognition systems from replacing humans, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms. Then we'll discuss how you can use phonetics and vowel sounds (as well as a few other tricks!) to help you figure out a word or phrase in a muddled recording. Then we'll talk a bit about the radiology department and radiology reports, and we'll finish up by practicing transcribing one in today's assignment.

Grammar, Sentence Structure, and Punctuation

Today we're going to talk about some subjects that might make you cringe a little: grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation. But I promise this will be a painless, maybe even enjoyable, journey through some of the basic principles of writing that will help you become a better MT. Then, in our Practice Corner, we'll talk a little more about SOAP notes and then turn our attention to infectious diseases and medications. You'll also have the chance to transcribe a SOAP note and a radiology report in the assignment that accompanies the lesson.

Style

We'll continue our examination of writing in this lesson by talking about style from the MT's perspective. When you're transcribing, you must follow editorial directions in spelling, capitalization, and typographical display. And it's those directions that are the style MTs need to be concerned about. I think you'll be surprised at how many different ways you can treat a single word. Should it be capitalized or lowercased? Should you abbreviate it, or should you spell it out? Should your numbers be in digit form or word form? These are the issues we'll be covering in this lesson. Finally, in our Practice Corner, we'll focus on the H&P report, and you'll have the chance to practice transcribing one.

Medical Terminology and Spelling

No matter what you transcribe, one thing is a given: Medical terminology will be a huge part of it. That's what we'll be focusing on today. One thing to remember is that dictators aren't perfect. They might say one word when they actually mean another. Or they might say a word that has a sound-alike word, like cystitome and cystotome. If you have a good understanding of medical terminology, you can pinpoint the correct word to make sure your transcription is accurate. Then, in our Practice Corner, I'll review the basic nature of heart disease and its treatment. We'll also take a close look at another common disease: diabetes.

Report Formatting and Word Processing

A critical component of the MT's work is the way you put your reports together. So in this lesson, we'll talk about how to break up your reports into sections with headings, subheadings, special line spacing, page breaks, and other formatting niceties. We'll also take a closer look at ways you can make your work easier by using word processing shortcuts, AutoText, macros, and templates. Mastering them will make you a faster and more efficient MT! In the Practice Corner, we'll focus on surgical reports. Surgical terminology is important to know, and it's also fascinating to take an inside look at what goes on in the operating room. The assignment for this lesson will include a surgical report to help you put to work all the new knowledge you've gained.

Checking Your Work

Another essential step in transcription is editing and proofreading your work. And that's what we'll concentrate on today. I'll start off by sharing some editing do's and don'ts as well as what to look for when you're proofreading. In our Practice Corner, we'll be covering a disease process that has, in some way, touched virtually everyone: cancer. Once you have an overview of cancer, we'll work on the consultation report. Physicians often ask specialists to further evaluate their patients, especially cancer patients. So this is a common report that you're likely to transcribe regularly. The assignment for this lesson includes a consult report to transcribe, and you'll also get to practice proofreading.

Classification Systems, and Discharge and Death Summaries

So far we've focused on the mechanical elements of medical transcription. But there is still a lot you need to know about clinical issues. So this will be a completely clinical lesson. We'll talk about classification systems and their transcription foibles. And now that you have the bones of grammar and style down, we're going to talk about some real bones. We'll begin by discussing information on fractures and spine levels. Finally, in our Practice Corner, we'll discuss discharge and death summaries. They are very similar reports, but we'll take a look at some of their subtle differences.

Infections, Blood, and Cells

This lesson will be similar to the last in that it covers lots of clinical issues. It won't all be clinical, however. There are a few miscellaneous things that I want to make sure I share with you. They don't really fit into neat categories, so I've put them all here. Once we finish with these miscellaneous items, we'll jump back into some clinical issues. We'll be talking specifically about infections. Then we'll turn our attention to smaller parts of the body—cells and blood. Then, in our Practice Corner, you'll see how everything you've learned can come together in an autopsy report. This is probably the longest, most comprehensive report you'll ever come across. And, of course, you'll have the chance to transcribe an autopsy report in the assignment!

The Nuts and Bolts of Working as an MT

By now you have the tools and the knowledge you need to dip your toe into the waters of medical transcription. But we still have a couple of big questions to answer. How do you manage your workload? Also, how do you establish yourself as a medical transcriptionist? And do you need more training? Today we'll discuss all the different ways you can work—everything from being an independent contractor all the way up to consultant work. We'll talk about additional training as well. Then we'll take a peek at some of the events on the horizon, and you'll see why this is an exciting time to enter the transcription field. For our final Practice Corner, we'll look at the Health Story Project. It's an initiative to develop standards for integrating narrative reports (like the ones you've been transcribing) into the electronic medical record in a meaningful way—giving them the ability to be searched and to extrapolate data like we have never been able to do before.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Adobe PDF plug - in ( a free download obtained at Adobe.com)

Email

Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in these courses gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. They have the flexibility to study at their own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. And they can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

New sessions of each course run every month. They last six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor facilitates every course; pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions.

About this Course

Learn What it Takes to Have a Successful Career in Healthcare

Explore a Career in Medical Coding

Take your first step toward a lucrative career as a medical coder! In this course, you'll learn how to use the CPT manual and the ICD-10-CM to find medical codes for any disease, condition, treatment, or surgical procedure. This knowledge will help prepare you to work almost anywhere in the medical field—doctors' offices, clinics, public health facilities, hospitals, labs, nursing homes, insurance agencies, or even the comfort of your own home.

We'll go through each of the main systems of the human body—integumentary (skin), musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and male and female genitourinary—outlining the medical terminology, conditions, diseases, injuries, treatments, and procedures you'll see most often in each of those systems.

Along the way, we'll go through lots of real-world examples and coding exercises to get you using your coding tools in conjunction with your analytical skills to come up with just the right codes to describe any medical situation. In the process, you'll get all the hands-on experience you'll need to code medical insurance claims with confidence. By the end of this course, you'll know how to find your way through both the CPT manual and the ICD-10-CM manual, and you'll be well on your way to a career as a medical coder!

Explore a Career as an Administrative Medical Assistant

Learn what it takes to have a successful career as an administrative medical assistant in the exciting and high-demand world of healthcare.

In this course, you'll master the basics of scheduling patients' appointments, surgeries, and hospital admissions. In addition, you'll discover how to create, maintain, and file medical charts. You'll also find out how to verify patients' insurance, create encounter forms (charge tickets), post charges, obtain pre-authorizations from insurers, and schedule return visits.

After that, we'll go behind the scenes as you learn how to apply diagnostic and procedure codes to patients' accounts and bill their insurance companies. Next, we'll explore additional accounts receivable tasks including posting payments and adjustments, billing secondary insurance, and following up on unpaid insurance claims. You'll also learn what a day sheet is, why it's important, and how to keep track of all your patient accounts on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis.

Finally, we'll delve into the basics of keeping a medical office running smoothly—from ordering supplies to scheduling staff meetings and making travel arrangements.

If you're organized, you're a "people person," and you're interested in a secure job in the healthcare field, a career as an administrative medical assistant may be just what you're looking for. This course will set you on the path to that career and help you determine which aspect of medical information management—from patient contact to billing and coding—suits you best.

Explore a Career in Medical Transcription

Take your first step toward a lucrative career as a medical transcriptionist! In this course, you'll learn how to transcribe the most common medical reports used in both inpatient and outpatient settings. We'll review a lot of the grammar you might have forgotten since high school and apply it to the reports. This knowledge will help prepare you to work almost anywhere in the medical field—doctors' offices, clinics, public health facilities, and hospitals. With this foundation, you'll be set to advance your education so you can work as a subcontractor for a company that outsources transcription, or you can eventually even take on your own clients—all from the comfort of your own home.

We'll go through each of the nine main report types—their formatting requirements, the components of each one, and how they are used in the clinical setting. We'll review grammar points in every lesson, pointing out important elements that will make your reports perfect. You'll also gain important clinical knowledge of major disease processes that are essential to enhance your skill as a medical documentation specialist.

Along the way, we'll download a free transcriber that you'll use to listen to dictation, and we'll cover how to use it to produce the reports in your word processor. These hands-on exercises will give you the practice you'll need to determine if this field is for you. We'll also go through the options you'll have now and in the future by developing the skills of a medical transcriptionist. By the end of this course, you'll know the basic report types, have clinical knowledge of major diseases, be able to correct grammar from dictated reports on the fly, and know the next steps you'll need to take!

Course Fast Facts:

  • Learn Certificate in Explore a Career in Healthcare Suite in only 18 - 24 weeks
  • Approximately only 2 to 4 hours per week of study is required
  • This course is delivered 100% on-line and is accessible 24/7 from any computer or smartphone
  • Instructors lead each course and you will be able to interact with them and ask questions
  • You can study from home or at work at your own pace in your own time
  • You can download printer friendly course material or save for viewing off line
  • You will be awarded a certificate at completion of this course

How to study online course?

Upon enrolment an automated welcome email will be sent to you (please check your junk email inbox if not received as this is an automated email), in order for you to access your online course, which is Available 24/7 on any computer or smart mobile device. New courses start every month to ensure that we have the correct ratio of students to tutors available, please ensure you select a starting date when you go through our shopping cart, at checkout. The course is easy to follow and understand.

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

Course I: Explore a Career in Medical Coding

There are 12 units of study

 Medical Coding Basics

In our first lesson, we'll explore the history of medical insurance and medical coding. After that, we'll take a few minutes to get familiar with the coding books and tools that medical coders use. We'll finish up the lesson with an important discussion about patient privacy and confidentiality.

Coding in the Real World

Today we'll take a close look at how medical professionals use medical codes in the real world. We'll get to know the common forms medical coders use and explore the different types of medical codes you'll find in your coding books. By the time you finish this lesson, you'll understand how the different types of codes come together on the claim form and how they tell the insurance company a complete story about any doctor-patient encounter.

Getting to Know Your CPT Manual

In this lesson, we'll take a detailed tour through the CPT manual where you'll find medical codes for the procedures and treatments doctors and other medical professionals provide their patients. You'll learn all about the CPT symbols, modifiers, and unlisted procedures. By the end of this lesson, you'll be looking up your first codes!

Getting to Know Your ICD-9-CM

Similar to our last lesson, today we'll take a detailed tour through the other coding book we'll use in this course, the ICD-9-CM, which is where you'll find the codes for any disease, illness, condition, or symptom that a patient may have. You'll learn all about the ICD-9-CM's symbols, formatting, and other conventions; and you'll learn where to find E-codes and V-codes. By the end of this lesson, you'll begin to practice coding diagnoses.

Coding the Integumentary System

Today we'll begin a series of lessons that will take us in depth into just one body system at a time so we can discuss specific medical coding situations for each area of the human body. In this lesson, we'll explore the integumentary (skin) system. We'll review the code categories for the most common skin conditions, infections, injuries, and procedures, and then we'll practice coding cases that involve common skin problems.

Coding the Musculoskeletal System

In this lesson, you'll learn all about the musculoskeletal system and study some important musculoskeletal vocabulary. We'll review the code categories for the most common muscle and bone conditions and injuries, and then you'll learn how to code the procedures doctors use to treat common muscle and bone problems.

Coding the Respiratory System

Today we'll review the respiratory system, and you'll learn how to code the most common respiratory conditions and injuries. After that, you'll practice coding the most common respiratory procedures that doctors use on their patients.

Coding the Cardiovascular System

We'll explore the cardiovascular system in today's lesson. You'll learn how to code common heart, vein, and artery conditions and diseases, and then you'll learn how to code the procedures doctors use most often to treat these common diagnoses. And as we always do, we'll follow up our general discussion on cardiovascular diseases and procedures with lots of coding practice.

Coding the Digestive and Endocrine Systems

In this lesson, you'll learn all about the digestive system and the endocrine system. We'll begin by studying some important vocabulary for both systems, and then we'll review the code categories for the most common conditions, diseases, and injuries. After that, we'll explore the procedures doctors perform to fix digestive and endocrine system problems. We'll end up the lesson with some practice coding both systems.

Coding the Male and Female Genitourinary Systems

In the last of our system-specific lessons, today we'll review the male and female genitourinary systems; and learn how to code common conditions, diseases, and procedures for both systems. We'll also spend some time discussing maternity and childbirth and the special medical coding challenges you'll need to consider in those cases

Evaluation and Management (E/M) Codes

Ready to get to know Evaluation and Management codes? Today, you'll learn the three key components of any E/M service, and I'll provide you with some helpful charts you can use to narrow down an E/M code range to a final E/M code. And as you probably guessed, we'll end up the lesson with plenty of E/M coding practice!

Surgical Packages and Modifiers

In our final lesson, you'll find out what's included in a surgical package and what's not. You'll also learn all about modifiers, and find out why medical coders use them to let insurance companies know about special circumstances. Finally, you'll put everything you've learned throughout the course together by coding some practice scenarios that incorporate all of the different types of codes!

 

Course II: Explore a Career as an Administrative Medical Assistant

There are 12 units of study

The Medical Office and Administrative Medical Assistant
Looking for a fun, challenging job that’s always in demand? If so, AMA (administrative medical assisting) may be just the field for you! In this lesson, we’ll look at the exciting job opportunities for AMAs, the variety of careers they can choose from, and the different settings where they can work.
 
Ethics, the Law, and HIPAA
The law and medicine go hand-in-hand—so today we’ll look at the laws you’ll want to know if you become an AMA. We’ll cover everything from contracts to malpractice, and delve into HIPAA (a federal act that affects everyone in the health care field). In addition, we’ll take a quick peek at ethics and medical office etiquette.
 
Computers and Office Equipment
Today we’ll explore the office equipment and computer hardware you’re likely to use as an AMA. In addition, we’ll delve into software—both standard office programs and the specialized software we use in the field of medical information management.

Filing Processes and Equipment
If you think filing is a bore, this lesson will change your mind. You’ll discover what the rainbow of colored stickers on a medical file means, and you’ll even practice creating a patient chart yourself. You’ll also find out why medical offices love lateral files, and you’ll master the tricky rules of alphabetizing. (Yes, it’s more challenging than it looks!)
 
Records Management
Now that you’re an expert on the outside of a patient chart, it’s time to look inside. Today you’ll find out which forms go in a medical record, and just where you’ll put each one. In addition, you’ll learn about two styles of note-taking: SOAP and CHEDDAR. And finally, you’ll delve into the topic of medical record audits and find out the legal way to correct a patient’s chart.

Appointment Scheduling, Check-In, and Check-Out
It’s time to introduce the star of our show: the patient. Today you’ll learn everything about what we call a patient encounter. We’ll start by talking about the phone skills you can use to make appointments, handle questions, and soothe angry callers. Next, we’ll flip open the appointment book and explore the tricks for scheduling patients easily and efficiently. And finally, we’ll follow a patient’s visit from start to finish, and see how many tasks an AMA does during that appointment.
 
Reception Area Tasks and Communication Skills
We’ll start this lesson in the waiting room, where you’ll learn more about the tasks a receptionist handles—from opening and closing a medical office to keeping the reception area ship-shape. After that, we’ll talk about some barriers to communicating effectively with patients, and you’ll discover ways to overcome them. We’ll end our lesson by looking at one of the fun and creative jobs that AMAs do: creating informational brochures and teaching aids.

Medical Insurance Basics
Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, commercial insurance—what does it all mean? In today’s lesson, you’ll find out! First, you’ll learn the meaning of terms like managed care, capitation, and fee-for-service.  Next, we’ll explore government programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Workers’ Compensation, and TRICARE. By the time you’re done, you’ll have a good feel for the many types of insurance an AMA handles every day.
 
The Medical Insurance Claim Form
Did you ever study an insurance claim form? If so, you know it contains dozens of mysterious questions and checkboxes. Well, today you’ll come face-to-face with one of these claim forms—and conquer it. By the end of our lesson, you’ll know how to fill in each field of the CMS-1500 claim form. In fact, you’ll even get to try it yourself!

Diagnostic Coding
Medical coding is a hot field for AMAs, so it’s a great specialty if you’re looking for job security. In today’s lesson, we’ll take a quick look at diagnostic coding and see why it’s both fun and challenging. We’ll take a tour through the ICD-9-CM, talk about the detective work involved in abstracting a diagnostic statement, and explore the steps of coding a diagnosis.

Procedural Coding
We’ll finish up our tour of medical coding today with an overview of procedural coding. First, you’ll learn all about a manual called the CPT and discover how to use it to code everything from surgeries to X-rays to acupuncture. After that, we’ll examine a second manual called the HCPCS (“hix-pix”), which contains codes for ambulances, root canals, and much more. We’ll also delve into anesthesia coding, a tricky but rewarding sub-specialty.

The Business Office
In our final lesson, we’ll visit the business office and talk about how AMAs keep track of the money coming in and going out. In addition, we’ll look at inventory control and supply ordering—two crucial jobs that help keep a medical office running smoothly. Finally, we’ll talk about managing a payroll and investigate several jobs that fall under the umbrella of human resources.

 

Course III: Explore a Career in Medical Transcription

There are 12 units of study

Introduction to Medical Transcription

In this first lesson, we'll look at the history of medical transcription as a career. You'll find out how the field has evolved into its modern form, and you'll explore the various skills and aptitudes that you'll need to succeed as a professional medical transcriptionist. You'll examine the type of work MTs produce, and we'll take a look at the MT's job today, where you might work, and what might be in store in the future for those working in this career field.

Tools of the Trade

We'll start today by discussing the MT's tools of the trade. We'll review a few of the reference books and discuss the types of Web sites that MTs use for research. Then we'll take a look at the hardware and software that today's MTs use on the job. I'll talk you through downloading the free software we'll use in this course, and then we'll go through a quick tour on how to use it. By the end of this lesson, you'll be sitting at your computer, listening to a real medical dictation audio file and looking at the Express Scribe software on your screen. As you listen to the medical report, you'll practice starting, pausing, and rewinding the audio as you tap away on the keyboard.

Understanding Medical Records

There are nine report types that medical professionals use most often in both hospitals and clinics. So in this lesson we'll go over a variety of examples of real medical reports. We'll also do a quick review of medical correspondence. Medical letters aren't much different from traditional letters, but since you might not have typed a traditional letter in a while, you might need a refresher. We'll finish the lesson with some specific tips about pathology reports and how to handle numbers and measurements. Then you'll practice transcribing a medical letter and a pathology report.

Listening Carefully

We'll spend this lesson going over how to listen most effectively, discussing the difference between hearing and active listening. We'll also touch on many of the issues that keep voice recognition systems from replacing humans, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms. Then we'll discuss how you can use phonetics and vowel sounds (as well as a few other tricks!) to help you figure out a word or phrase in a muddled recording. Then we'll talk a bit about the radiology department and radiology reports, and we'll finish up by practicing transcribing one in today's assignment.

Grammar, Sentence Structure, and Punctuation

Today we're going to talk about some subjects that might make you cringe a little: grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation. But I promise this will be a painless, maybe even enjoyable, journey through some of the basic principles of writing that will help you become a better MT. Then, in our Practice Corner, we'll talk a little more about SOAP notes and then turn our attention to infectious diseases and medications. You'll also have the chance to transcribe a SOAP note and a radiology report in the assignment that accompanies the lesson.

Style

We'll continue our examination of writing in this lesson by talking about style from the MT's perspective. When you're transcribing, you must follow editorial directions in spelling, capitalization, and typographical display. And it's those directions that are the style MTs need to be concerned about. I think you'll be surprised at how many different ways you can treat a single word. Should it be capitalized or lowercased? Should you abbreviate it, or should you spell it out? Should your numbers be in digit form or word form? These are the issues we'll be covering in this lesson. Finally, in our Practice Corner, we'll focus on the H&P report, and you'll have the chance to practice transcribing one.

Medical Terminology and Spelling

No matter what you transcribe, one thing is a given: Medical terminology will be a huge part of it. That's what we'll be focusing on today. One thing to remember is that dictators aren't perfect. They might say one word when they actually mean another. Or they might say a word that has a sound-alike word, like cystitome and cystotome. If you have a good understanding of medical terminology, you can pinpoint the correct word to make sure your transcription is accurate. Then, in our Practice Corner, I'll review the basic nature of heart disease and its treatment. We'll also take a close look at another common disease: diabetes.

Report Formatting and Word Processing

A critical component of the MT's work is the way you put your reports together. So in this lesson, we'll talk about how to break up your reports into sections with headings, subheadings, special line spacing, page breaks, and other formatting niceties. We'll also take a closer look at ways you can make your work easier by using word processing shortcuts, AutoText, macros, and templates. Mastering them will make you a faster and more efficient MT! In the Practice Corner, we'll focus on surgical reports. Surgical terminology is important to know, and it's also fascinating to take an inside look at what goes on in the operating room. The assignment for this lesson will include a surgical report to help you put to work all the new knowledge you've gained.

Checking Your Work

Another essential step in transcription is editing and proofreading your work. And that's what we'll concentrate on today. I'll start off by sharing some editing do's and don'ts as well as what to look for when you're proofreading. In our Practice Corner, we'll be covering a disease process that has, in some way, touched virtually everyone: cancer. Once you have an overview of cancer, we'll work on the consultation report. Physicians often ask specialists to further evaluate their patients, especially cancer patients. So this is a common report that you're likely to transcribe regularly. The assignment for this lesson includes a consult report to transcribe, and you'll also get to practice proofreading.

Classification Systems, and Discharge and Death Summaries

So far we've focused on the mechanical elements of medical transcription. But there is still a lot you need to know about clinical issues. So this will be a completely clinical lesson. We'll talk about classification systems and their transcription foibles. And now that you have the bones of grammar and style down, we're going to talk about some real bones. We'll begin by discussing information on fractures and spine levels. Finally, in our Practice Corner, we'll discuss discharge and death summaries. They are very similar reports, but we'll take a look at some of their subtle differences.

Infections, Blood, and Cells

This lesson will be similar to the last in that it covers lots of clinical issues. It won't all be clinical, however. There are a few miscellaneous things that I want to make sure I share with you. They don't really fit into neat categories, so I've put them all here. Once we finish with these miscellaneous items, we'll jump back into some clinical issues. We'll be talking specifically about infections. Then we'll turn our attention to smaller parts of the body—cells and blood. Then, in our Practice Corner, you'll see how everything you've learned can come together in an autopsy report. This is probably the longest, most comprehensive report you'll ever come across. And, of course, you'll have the chance to transcribe an autopsy report in the assignment!

The Nuts and Bolts of Working as an MT

By now you have the tools and the knowledge you need to dip your toe into the waters of medical transcription. But we still have a couple of big questions to answer. How do you manage your workload? Also, how do you establish yourself as a medical transcriptionist? And do you need more training? Today we'll discuss all the different ways you can work—everything from being an independent contractor all the way up to consultant work. We'll talk about additional training as well. Then we'll take a peek at some of the events on the horizon, and you'll see why this is an exciting time to enter the transcription field. For our final Practice Corner, we'll look at the Health Story Project. It's an initiative to develop standards for integrating narrative reports (like the ones you've been transcribing) into the electronic medical record in a meaningful way—giving them the ability to be searched and to extrapolate data like we have never been able to do before.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet. 

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

MAC/iOS

  • OSX/iOS 6 or later
  • Modern and up to date browser (Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Adobe PDF plug - in ( a free download obtained at Adobe.com)

Email

Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in these courses gain valuable knowledge at their convenience. They have the flexibility to study at their own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. And they can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

New sessions of each course run every month. They last six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor facilitates every course; pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions.

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Course Summary

Course ID No.: 007EACIHS
Delivery Mode: Online
Course Access: 18 - 24 weeks
Tutor Support: Yes
Time required: 72 hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate of Completion

Start Dates

This course is available to begin on the following dates

  • 17 July
  • 14 August
  • 11 September
  • 16 October

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