Human Anatomy and Physiology (Self-Paced Tutorial) Online Certificate Course

Understand The Marvelous Complexity Of The Human Body

Human Anatomy and Physiology (Self-Paced Tutorial) Online Certificate Course

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Study Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course and Understand the Marvelous Complexity of the Human Body

Human Anatomy and Physiology explains the nature of matter and the principles of chemistry that are important to human physiology. You will learn principles of genetics and gain an understanding of how traits are passed from one generation to the next.

This course goes in-depth on how the circulatory and respiratory systems work together to provide our bodies with the oxygen our tissues need, and how they work together with the skin and kidneys to rid our bodies of wastes. You will learn how our bodies fight off diseases, and how our digestive system converts the food we eat into energy and the tissues of our bodies. You will spend time on the endocrine system, which supplies the hormones we need for our survival, and the reproductive system, that group of organs that allows life to be passed on to another generation.

In addition, each lesson includes information about specific disorders that sometimes happen to our bodies. By the end of this course, you will have a greater appreciation and understanding of the marvelous complexity of the human body.

What you will learn with our Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course

  • Introduction to the Living Processes
  • The Human Cell
  • Understanding Heredity
  • The Nervous System
  • The Skeletal System
  • The Muscular System
  • The Respiratory System
  • The Circulatory System
  • The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease
  • The Integumentary and Urinary Systems
  • The Digestive System
  • The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems

Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course - Requirements

The Human Anatomy and Physiology Course is delivered 100 percent online 24/7.

To successfully complete this course, a student must:

  • Have access to the internet and the necessary technical skills to navigate the online learning resources
  • Have access to any mobile device with internet connectivity (laptop, desktop, tablet)
  • Be a self-directed learner
  • Possess sound language and literacy skills

Quick Course Facts

  1. Course content is structured for easy comprehension
  2. Registered students gain unrestricted access to the Human Anatomy and Physiology Course
  3. All course material is available online 24/7 and can be accessed using any device
  4. Study online from anywhere in your own time at your own pace
  5. All students who complete the course will be awarded with a certificate of completion

For any additional questions please see our comprehensive FAQS tab above.

Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course Outline

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Living Processes

Chapter 1: Introduction

There are several approaches to studying the human body. This course would concentrate on structural anatomy. Systemic anatomy is the study of the physical arrangement of the organ systems of the body. Organ systems are collections of structures, such as the mouth, trachea, and lungs, that collaborate to perform a particular purpose, such as breathing.

Chapter 2: Atoms 101

The atom is the smallest total unit of matter. Elements are atoms of the same form. Four components make up 96 percent of our weight in the human body. Hydrogen (H), carbon (C), oxygen (O), and nitrogen (N) are the four elements (N). Smaller amounts of elements, on the other hand, are vitally necessary, and we will discuss them in this course.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Ions
  • Compounds
  • Energy
  • Enzymes

Chapter 3: Body Composition

Each molecule's characteristics are determined by the number and form of atoms present. Carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids are the four major groups of organic molecules present in the body. Organic compounds are made up of both carbon and hydrogen atoms.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Types of Molecules
  • Organelles and Cells
  • Tissues
  • Organs and Organ Systems

Chapter 4: Characteristics of Living Organisms

A recently deceased human being has the same form as a living human being, but there is a basic difference between the two bodies. Living organisms have lives, are composed of cells, require energy, expand, multiply, and react to their surroundings. While a dead body has cells, they do not use resources or perform any activities associated with life, such as development or reproduction.

Chapter 5: A Recap

Matter is made up of atoms, which are in turn made up of subatomic particles. Molecules are formed when two or more atoms join together. Organelles, or cell components, are made up of various types of molecules. Tissues are made up of similar cells that have been grouped together. Tissues combine to form cells, which collaborate to form organ systems. A living body is made up of all of the organ systems working together.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Understanding Homeostasis
  • Negative Feedback Systems

Lesson 2: The Human Cell

Chapter 1: Introduction

The composition and role of the cell will be discussed in this lecture. A human adult has trillions of them, and each one is a feat of innovation in and of itself. Cells have a variety of structures, but most are so thin that they cannot be seen without a microscope. The cell is the smallest living unit of the body, just as the atom is the smallest total unit of matter.

Chapter 2: The Cell's Membranes: Structure and Function

The cell membrane maintains the cell's integrity. It shields its contents from the outside world. The cell membrane is made up of double layers of phospholipid molecules. This bilayer's two outer surfaces draw water, while its two inner surfaces repel it. The polar ends are the outer ends of molecules that can bear an electric charge.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Transportation of Materials

Chapter 3: Inside the Cell

Although the organelles in various tissues differ greatly, their mechanisms and functions are identical. The nucleus, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, lysosomes, and mitochondria will all be analyzed. It may also discuss cilia and flagella, which are fibers formed from a cell's cytoskeleton.

Chapter 4: Cell Division

The majority of cells are very thin. This is significant because cells rely on diffusion to transfer oxygen and nutrients within their protoplasm. If the distances these molecules must cover are too great, the inner areas of the cell will die and suffer from oxygen starvation. Waste removal will be problematic as well.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Interphase: Premitosis
  • Prophase: Phase I
  • Metaphase: Phase II
  • Anaphase: Phase III
  • Telophase: Phase IV
  • Cytokinesis: Phase V

Chapter 5: Cancer: Development of Tumors

Cells, like factories, have quality control processes in operation. During cell division, the cell scans for complications that could result in dysfunctional cells on a regular basis. It ensures that exact copies of genes are created and that spindle fibers work properly. If the damage is irreversible, the cell dies by apoptosis.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Causes of Cancer
  • Cancer Treatment
  • Prevention

Lesson 3: Understanding Heredity

Chapter 1: Introduction to Heredity

If a person has an identical twin, any person on the planet has chromosomes that are unlike everyone else's. Nonetheless, humans are more alike than they realize. In reality, 99.9 percent of everyone's genetic material is similar. The 0.1 percent variation in their DNA accounts for all of the diversity among the billions of humans on the planet.

Chapter 2: How Genes Function

Genes are segments of these DNA threads that provide the instructions for creating all of the various substances and structures in our bodies. Genes often direct the creation of a new organism from a single fertilized cell, provide instructions for that organism's growth and maturation, allow cell repair, and control all of the processes associated with life.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Step 1: DNA contains the code to build proteins
  • Step 2: DNA transfers the code to a messenger RNA molecule
  • Step 3: mRNA leaves the nucleus and attaches to a ribosome
  • Step 4: tRNA brings amino acids to the ribosome
  • Step 5: Amino acids link together
  • Step 6: Ribosome releases the protein
  • Introns and Exons
  • Gene Activation

Chapter 3: Inheritance of Traits: Meiosis

This chapter will look at how the reproductive cells (gametes) divide again in order to produce a fertilized egg. It'll explain that they must have half the number of chromosomes of the rest of the body's cells. Meiosis is the process of separation that causes sperm and egg cells to have the right number of chromosomes.

Chapter 4: Patterns of Inheritance

Any of these biological rules were discovered by Gregor Mendel, a Roman Catholic monk who lived in central Europe from 1822 to 1884. He established hypotheses of how behaviors are passed on by families. He has been dubbed "The Father of Genetics" for his contributions to our understanding of inheritance patterns.

Chapter 5: Genetic Disorders

While Gregor Mendel's genetic theories were published in 1866, they were largely forgotten until 1900. Cell division was not observed by biologists until the 1890s, when improved microscopes were invented. They began to take Mendel's work seriously and recognized that his assumptions regarding succession were right.

Lesson 4: The Nervous System

Chapter 1: Introduction

The brain, spinal cord, and all of the nerves within and outside of those systems comprise this system. It has three essential functions: it receives sensory input from all areas of the body, processes it, and stimulates muscles and glands to transfer or secrete substances. They may also partake in cognitive tasks, or reasoning processes, thanks to the nervous system.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems
  • PNS: Voluntary and Autonomic Subsystems

Chapter 2: Autonomic Subsystem: Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Division

The parasympathetic nervous system is made up of nerves that originate in the brain and the lowest portion of the spinal cord, the sacrum. This system's impulses appear to slow us down. The sympathetic system's nerves emerge from the spinal cord's lung, thoracic, and lower back, lumbar, areas. When we are in a fight or flight condition, this device speeds us up and becomes extremely triggered.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Brain Stem
  • Thalamus and Hypothalamus
  • The Cerebellum
  • The Cerebrum

Chapter 3: Structure of Nerves

Nerves protrude from the spinal cord in the same way as main branches protrude from the trunk of a tree. However, each nerve is made up of thousands of individual cells known as neurons. From the main branch, smaller and smaller branches of neurons emerge, before every muscle fiber, blood vessel, and gland is linked to a neuron.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Neurons of the Peripheral Nervous System
  • Neurons of the Central Nervous System
  • Structure of Neurons
  • Neuroglia

Chapter 4: The Reflex Arc

Reflex arcs allow muscles to contract incredibly rapidly in order to shield people from injury. They don't have to wait for a warning to reach the brain for examination before fleeing from something extremely painful. The discomfort is generally beneficial.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Synapse
  • The Nervous Impulse
  • The Role of the Brain

Chapter 5: Disorders of the Nervous System

Since neurons cannot differentiate, they do not regenerate as they die. When an accident or infection destroys or severely affects enough nerves, a person's ability to absorb and react to sensory input suffers. Disease may also damage neuroglia cells, so we'll start with a disease that attacks the neuroglia cells that generate myelin.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Alzheimer's Disease
  • Brain Tumors
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Brain Injuries
  • Peripheral Neuropathy

Lesson 5: The Skeletal System

Chapter 1: Introduction to the Skeletal System

Living cells in bones are surrounded by nonliving extracellular material. Each cell has its own little room, much like its own apartment.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Functions of the Skeletal System
  • Types of Bones

Chapter 2: Types of Joints

Since fibrous joints are bound by thick connective tissue that makes very little mobility, they are either immobile or only partially movable. Sutures bind the flat bones in the skull, which is an example of a fibrous joint. The radius and ulna bones of the forearm both form a fibrous joint, although they are further apart than the bones that form sutures.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of Synovial Joints

Chapter 3: Axial and Appendicular Skeletons

The skeleton, like the nervous system, is divided into two sections: the axial skeleton and the appendicular skeleton. The bones that support the head, spine, and trunk comprise the axial skeleton. The skull, the vertebral spine, the lungs, and the breastbone are among them.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Skull
  • The Vertebral Column
  • The Thoracic Cage
  • Appendicular Skeleton

Chapter 4: Anatomy of a Long Bone

The bone's shaft is called the diaphysis. It is a hollow tube made mainly of thick compressed bone. The medullary cavity, which is located inside the diaphysis, contains red or yellow bone marrow.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Bone as Connective Tissue
  • The Bone Matrix
  • Cancellous and Compact Bone Tissue
  • Blood-Making Cells

Chapter 5: Bone and Joint Disorders

This final chapter on the skeletal system would go through some of the most serious bone and joint conditions that can cause problems for people. Most individuals, for example, experience osteoarthritis to a degree as they age.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Scoliosis

Lesson 6: The Muscular System

Chapter 1: Introduction

 Muscle tissue is one of the four major groups of tissues in the body, and there are three types of muscle tissue: skeletal, smooth, and cardiac. Smooth muscle is located in the organ walls, while cardiac muscle is found in the heart. Remember that the autonomic nervous system controls both heart and smooth muscle, while the voluntary nervous system controls skeletal muscle.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Muscle Tissue
  • Muscle Function

Chapter 2: Muscle Anatomy

The muscle belly, the main part of the muscle, contains thousands of individual muscle fibers, or cells. Muscle fibers are bundled together in coils analogous to how nerves are arranged in a nerve. However, since muscle fibers remain within the muscle belly, it could be more useful to think of them as straws packed together in this situation.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • A Movement of the Upper Limb

Chapter 3: Concentric and Eccentric Contractions

The biceps and brachialis used a concentric contraction as people bent their elbow. As muscle fibers are activated, they shorten and bring the bones closely together. A joint's angle is reduced as a result of this. Eccentric contractions are widely used.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • A Movement of the Lower Limb
  • Abdominal Muscles
  • Back and Neck Muscles

Chapter 4: The Motor Unit

When muscles contract, the nervous and neural systems collaborate. The spinal cord is the origin of motor nerves, which carry signals to skeletal muscles. Their axons communicate with individual muscle fibers through branches. They will branch a few or thousands of times, regulating a few or thousands of muscle fibers.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Motor Memory
  • Shortening of the Muscle Fibers

Chapter 5: Injuries to the Muscular System

The muscle system is particularly vulnerable to athletic or overuse injuries, but our bodies have an unusual way of defending it. Tendons are the structures that attach muscles to bones. They have sensory systems called Golgi tendon organs located in them. These monitor the amount of tension on the tendon.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Tendonitis
  • Muscle Strain
  • Bruising
  • Acute Compartment Syndrome
  • Myositis Ossificans
  • Muscle Atrophy

Lesson 7: The Respiratory System

Chapter 1: Introduction

Respiration actually corresponds to four distinct processes. Different scholars use different terminology to describe the same systems. When they breathe, air flows into and out of their lungs. That would be referred to as ventilation. Then there is a gas exchange between the air in the lungs and the blood, mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide. This is known as external respiration.

Chapter 2: The Nose

When a human inhale, air typically reaches their respiratory system through their nostrils. The nasal cavities are reached through the nostrils. They are separated by a septum in the nasal cavity. The septum's backbone is composed of bone, but the front section is made of cartilage. This gives it a lot of leeway.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Moving on Down
  • And on into the Lungs

Chapter 3: Ventilation

The scientific term for the actual process of drawing air into and moving it out of the lungs is ventilation.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Pleura
  • Inspiration
  • Expiration

Chapter 4: External Respiration

External respiration is the next step in the process. This is the gas exchange in the alveoli, the small balloons at the ends of the airways.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Internal Respiration
  • Cellular Respiration
  • The Brain's Role

Chapter 5: Disorders of the Respiratory System

The respiratory system is continually vulnerable to bacteria, but humans have several systems in place to shield them from respiratory illnesses. The common cold is the most common and least dangerous, but it can escalate to something more severe in people with poor health.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Bronchitis
  • Pneumonia
  • Tuberculosis
  • Asthma

Lesson 8: The Circulatory System

Chapter 1: Introduction

The circulatory system is made up of the heart and all of the blood vessels in the body. The heart is a living organ that pumps blood into 60,000 miles of spinning and rotating blood vessels. It beats about 100,000 times every 24 hours, never stopping.

Chapter 2: The Heart

Broken heart, heart ache, rubbed the heart—all expressions that demonstrate how much the heart is synonymous with feeling. And heart symbols are frequently used to signify love, especially romantic love. The brain is the true center of human emotions, but the heart is also a remarkable organ. It's a pump that's more powerful and long-lasting than anything man has ever made.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of the Heart
  • The Heart's Electrical System
  • The Heart's Blood Vessels

Chapter 3: Path of Human Blood

Remember that, with the exception of the pulmonary arteries, an artery is a kind of blood vessel that transports oxygenated blood. The aorta, which has several branches, is the largest trunk. These branches thin out until they are thin-walled capillaries that cause molecules to diffuse in and out.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Major Blood Vessels
  • Anatomy of Blood Vessels

Chapter 4: Functions of Blood

Blood acts as a delivery medium by transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide. However, these are not the only compounds that blood transports. Blood takes up nutrients from the food we consume in the small intestine and transports them to where they are needed. In addition to carbon dioxide, blood sucks up other waste materials and transports them to the kidneys.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Blood Composition
  • Red Blood Cells
  • White Blood Cells
  • Platelets

Chapter 5: Diseases of the Circulatory System

Circulatory system diseases injure more individuals than any other disorder. It's important to understand these two conditions because they can arise without any apparent symptoms.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Coronary Artery Disease

Lesson 9: The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease

Chapter 1: Introduction

Each of the organ systems is known by two separate names. Because of its critical role in the body's battle against germs, the lymphatic system is often referred to as the immune system. This is referred to as immunological protection. However, the term immune system would not be used in this course because there is no such thing as an immune system with its own organs and structures.

Chapter 2: Structure and Function of the Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system has three primary functions: fluid balance in the bloodstream, fat absorption in the small intestine, and immunological protection.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Fluid Regulation
  • Lymph Nodes and Nodules
  • Movement of Lymph
  • Bone Marrow, the Thymus Gland, and the Spleen

Chapter 3: Staying Healthy

Cold viruses would kill so many cells that the organs would simply shut down. It could happen rapidly depending on how quickly the viruses multiplied.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Your First Line of Defense: The Skin
  • Mucous Membranes
  • Other First-Line Defenses
  • Inflammatory Response

Chapter 4: Specific Immunological Responses

When blood flows into the lymph nodes, the cells constantly search for the presence of foreign invaders. Remember that just about 10% of the body's fluid from blood is lymph, but that's enough to spot a trespasser. If one is found, the lymph node begins to produce more lymphocytes in order to fight off any potential infection.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Humoral Immunity
  • Cell-Mediated Immunity

Chapter 5: Allergies

When subjected to an allergen, some people respond very moderately, while others get very ill. Pollen, house dust, mold, and animal dander are all common allergens. Some individuals are allergic to specific foods, such as peanuts and eggs. Allergies to bug bites or specific drugs are also very common.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Autoimmune Diseases
  • Immune Deficiencies: Inherited and Acquired

Lesson 10: The Integumentary and Urinary Systems

Chapter 1: Introduction

The integumentary system is linked to the urinary system. Despite their distinct purposes, each of these devices serve to rid the bodies of waste materials. Since urine exits the body, this is a fairly clear feature of the urinary system, but it is a less obvious function of the integumentary system.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Skin
  • Temperature Regulation, Waste Removal, and Vitamin D
  • Sensation

Chapter 2: The Integumentary System

The integumentary structure is made up of three layers of skin, one on top of the other, as well as appendages such as skin glands, hair, and nails. Blood vessels, sensory receptors, nerves, hair follicles, and tiny muscles such as arrector pili run along its middle segment, together with these structures.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Epidermis
  • Downward to the Dermis
  • The Hypodermis
  • Hair
  • Fingernails and Toenails
  • Skin Glands

Chapter 3: The Urinary System and Its Functions

The kidneys, ureters, intestine, and urethra are the four primary components of the urinary system. They comprise the main waste removal scheme. Per day, the kidneys filter approximately 400 gallons (1,400 liters) of blood. They produce urine during the process, but they still have other important tasks to complete.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of the Urinary System

Chapter 4: The Nephron

Pressure filtration, partial reabsorption, tubular secretion, and water reabsorption are the four stages in the process of washing the blood and producing urine.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Step 1: Pressure Filtration
  • Step 2: Selective Reabsorption
  • Step 3: Secretion
  • Step 4: Reabsorption of Water

Chapter 5: Kidney Failure

The inability of the kidneys to remove waste materials from the blood is referred to as kidney failure. Acute renal failure (ARF) is characterized by a sudden loss of kidney function. Chronic renal failure (CRF) is characterized by a progressive loss of kidney function. Both environments endanger life and waste materials are toxic to the body.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Acute Renal Failure
  • Chronic Renal Failure
  • Dialysis
  • Kidney Transplantation

Lesson 11: The Digestive System

Chapter 1: Introduction

So much of the wrong kind of diet can also lead to Type 2 diabetes, a major risk factor for high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. Obesity has an effect on any aspect of the body and can make daily life challenging. Since the skeleton needs to carry the extra weight, it can also cause joint and spine injuries. However, not having enough food is also harmful.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • An Overview

Chapter 2: Nutrition: The Big and the Small of It

Mothers nag, and children refuse, but eating a well-balanced diet is critical. The body needs the correct balance of nutrients, which are the substances found in food that provide nutrition and aid in cell function. It is possible to be both overweight and malnourished.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Macronutrients
  • Micronutrients

Chapter 3: Open Up and Say Ahhh!

The entire digestion process consists of several stages, and this topic is divided into three parts. It will begin with the mouth, pharynx, and esophagus. It would then accompany the dinner into the intestine. Finally, it will investigate what happens in the small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. The digestion phase is not always pleasant, but it is essential for the body to survive.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Mouth, Pharynx, and Esophagus
  • The Stomach
  • The Small Intestine, Large Intestine, and Rectum

Chapter 4: A Look Back

When an individual was mummified in ancient Egypt, the liver was held in canopic jars guarded by the four sons of Horus and Isis. In Greek mythology, Zeus, on the other hand, ordered an eagle to pluck Prometheus' liver because the titan had brought humankind fire. People today may not have such warm feelings for this organ, but it, along with the gallbladder and pancreas, plays many important roles in digestion.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of the Liver
  • Liver Function
  • The Gallbladder
  • The Pancreas

Chapter 5: Heartburn

Perhaps the muscle does not close completely or relaxes when it does not. When this occurs, stomach acid, and even food, backs up towards the esophagus. This is known as acid reflux. Along with discomfort, acid reflux signs can include a sore throat, hoarseness, chronic cough, a lump in the throat, and a sour or acid taste in the mouth.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Peptic Ulcers
  • Colon Cancer

Lesson 12: The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems

Chapter 1: Introduction

The endocrine system is made up of a series of glands that secrete chemicals that have a significant impact on our body's tissues. The reproductive system is aptly named; it encourages humans to replicate and create new members of their genus.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Function of the Endocrine System

Chapter 2: Major Glands and Their Hormones

The hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pineal body, thyroid, parathyroids, pancreas, adrenal glands, and ovaries in females and testes in males are all important endocrine system glands. The hypothalamus, pituitary, and pineal glands are situated in the brain; the thyroid and parathyroid glands are located in the front portion of the lower neck; the pancreas is located below the stomach; and the adrenal glands are located on top of each kidney. The ovaries are found in the pelvis in females, and the testes are located outside the body in the scrotum in males.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Endocrine Glands of the Brain
  • Other Major Glands

Chapter 3: Introduction to Reproduction

The new organism begins with a single genetically unique cell that rapidly multiplies to produce several different types of cells. Some cells form nervous tissue, others form kidney tissue, still others form blood cells, still others form muscle and bone, and so on. Except for medically aided fertilization, this development normally occurs in an ordered and predictable manner and starts with the pleasurable act of sexual intercourse.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Penis
  • Testes and Scrotum
  • Accessory Glands
  • Ejaculation

Chapter 4: Male vs. Female

All is aware that males and females vary greatly. This distinction begins at conception, when the male embryo receives the XY chromosome pair and the female embryo receives the XX chromosome pair. Male and female embryos appear the same before the seventh week of conception. Male embryos begin to develop testes at this stage, while female embryos begin to form ovaries.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Ovaries and Fallopian Tubes
  • The Uterus
  • Vagina and External Genitalia
  • Female Hormonal Cycle

Chapter 5: Two Common Disorders

Endometriosis is a term used to describe two common diseases, one affecting the endocrine system and the other involving the female reproductive system. These two mechanisms may be affected by a wide range of disorders. The male reproductive system may also be problematic.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Diabetes
  • Endometriosis

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

There are 12 units of study

Module 1: Introduction to the Living Processes

Our first lesson will introduce you to the fascinating subject of human anatomy and physiology. Since chemical reactions drive all of our bodies' functions, you will start by reviewing some basic chemistry. Finally, you will learn about homeostasis—that drive humans have to keep many different variables (like temperature and blood pressure) within a narrow range. By the time you're done with this lesson, you will be ready to learn more about the structure and function of our bodies.

Module 2: The Human Cell

The smallest living unit of the body is the cell. It's so amazing, it deserves a lesson of its own. Even though almost all cells are microscopic, they're jam-packed with many different kinds of organelles and surrounded by complex membranes.

Module 3: Understanding Heredity

This lesson tackles the subject of heredity. It's probably the most technical of all the lessons because it explores genetics. You will learn how genes determine your physical and mental characteristics, and how your parents' genetic material determine these traits. Then you will meet a man who lived in the 1800's—Gregor Mendel, the Father of Genetics—because his insights paved the way for our modern understanding of heredity.

Module 4: The Nervous System

This lesson introduces the nervous system. You will learn how it's organized, its different jobs, and the structures that make thinking, feeling, and moving possible. You will also learn how the nervous system works when we think we're in danger or we've suddenly been affected by physical pain. You will use your chemistry knowledge in this chapter in looking at how nervous impulses are transmitted. Finally, you will learn about nervous system disorders —what causes them and their effects.

Module 5: The Skeletal System

Our bones have several functions, and some aren't so obvious. For example, did you know that red blood cells are made in your bones? Or that bones store minerals that are essential for the function of your nerves and muscles? This lesson explores the structure and function of bones, different types of joints, and the amazing structure of your spinal column. You will learn about some common disorders of this system and what you can do to keep your bones strong.

Module 6: The Muscular System

Like the skeletal system, the muscular system is crucial for movement, but it has other functions, too. Muscles are also a lot more complicated than they appear. You will learn why even simple movements involve chemical reactions and a close coordination between this system and the nervous system. In the last chapter, you will learn about several common injuries to different parts of the muscular system.

Module 7: The Respiratory System

This lesson focuses on the respiratory system in this lesson. As you're probably aware, it's the group of organs that allow you to get that crucial substance—oxygen—to all the cells in our body. But your respiratory system has some other functions that this lesson touches on. You will learn about the anatomy of your respiratory organs and which muscles are crucial for breathing. You will also become aware of the differences between ventilation, external respiration, internal respiration, and cellular respiration.

Module 8: The Circulatory System

There's so much to learn about the circulatory system. This lesson explores the composition of blood, the various blood cells, and the different kinds of blood vessels in your body. Of course, the heart is a crucial part of the circulatory system, so you will learn about its chambers, valves, coronary vessels, and electrical system. You will learn how blood travels around the body and its important functions. You will finish this lesson knowing the importance of taking care of this organ system.

Module 9: The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease

In today's very interesting lesson, you will learn all about the disease-fighting ability of your body. The human body also has a system of vessels (similar to blood vessels) called the lymphatic system. You will learn about its disease-fighting role as well as some of its other functions. You will learn about some of the other organs in your body that are involved in the battle against disease. This lesson concludes with the different ways the body's disease-fighting ability can be compromised and why sometimes the body turns on its own cells.

Module 10: The Integumentary and Urinary Systems

This lesson takes a closer look at two different organ systems—the integumentary system (the skin) and the urinary system. Both of these systems work to get rid of waste products that would kill you if they were allowed to build up in your body. You will learn, too, how important these two systems are in maintaining homeostasis. People are often surprised to learn how complex even the skin can be. And the structures of the urinary system, particularly the kidneys, are quite amazing. At the end of this lesson, you will know all about kidney failure and the challenges of dialysis and kidney transplantation.

Module 11: The Digestive System

You might not think about food the same way after this lesson on the digestive system. This lesson explores all the different structures involved with converting food into the chemicals our bodies need to grow, repair tissues, and carry on all the functions of life. When you finish this lesson, you will understand the value of eating a variety of foods, how good food choices will enhance your health, and about one of the most common kinds of cancer—colon cancer.

Module 12: The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems

This course concludes with a lesson on the endocrine and reproductive systems. You will learn how the endocrine and nervous systems work together to regulate all of your body's functions. Finally, you will explore some specific endocrine glands, the hormones they produce, and how they influence each other.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet.

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Note: This course is not suitable for Macintosh users.

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About this Course

Study Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course and Understand the Marvelous Complexity of the Human Body

Human Anatomy and Physiology explains the nature of matter and the principles of chemistry that are important to human physiology. You will learn principles of genetics and gain an understanding of how traits are passed from one generation to the next.

This course goes in-depth on how the circulatory and respiratory systems work together to provide our bodies with the oxygen our tissues need, and how they work together with the skin and kidneys to rid our bodies of wastes. You will learn how our bodies fight off diseases, and how our digestive system converts the food we eat into energy and the tissues of our bodies. You will spend time on the endocrine system, which supplies the hormones we need for our survival, and the reproductive system, that group of organs that allows life to be passed on to another generation.

In addition, each lesson includes information about specific disorders that sometimes happen to our bodies. By the end of this course, you will have a greater appreciation and understanding of the marvelous complexity of the human body.

What you will learn with our Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course

  • Introduction to the Living Processes
  • The Human Cell
  • Understanding Heredity
  • The Nervous System
  • The Skeletal System
  • The Muscular System
  • The Respiratory System
  • The Circulatory System
  • The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease
  • The Integumentary and Urinary Systems
  • The Digestive System
  • The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems

Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course - Requirements

The Human Anatomy and Physiology Course is delivered 100 percent online 24/7.

To successfully complete this course, a student must:

  • Have access to the internet and the necessary technical skills to navigate the online learning resources
  • Have access to any mobile device with internet connectivity (laptop, desktop, tablet)
  • Be a self-directed learner
  • Possess sound language and literacy skills

Quick Course Facts

  1. Course content is structured for easy comprehension
  2. Registered students gain unrestricted access to the Human Anatomy and Physiology Course
  3. All course material is available online 24/7 and can be accessed using any device
  4. Study online from anywhere in your own time at your own pace
  5. All students who complete the course will be awarded with a certificate of completion

For any additional questions please see our comprehensive FAQS tab above.

Human Anatomy and Physiology Online Course Outline

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Living Processes

Chapter 1: Introduction

There are several approaches to studying the human body. This course would concentrate on structural anatomy. Systemic anatomy is the study of the physical arrangement of the organ systems of the body. Organ systems are collections of structures, such as the mouth, trachea, and lungs, that collaborate to perform a particular purpose, such as breathing.

Chapter 2: Atoms 101

The atom is the smallest total unit of matter. Elements are atoms of the same form. Four components make up 96 percent of our weight in the human body. Hydrogen (H), carbon (C), oxygen (O), and nitrogen (N) are the four elements (N). Smaller amounts of elements, on the other hand, are vitally necessary, and we will discuss them in this course.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Ions
  • Compounds
  • Energy
  • Enzymes

Chapter 3: Body Composition

Each molecule's characteristics are determined by the number and form of atoms present. Carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids are the four major groups of organic molecules present in the body. Organic compounds are made up of both carbon and hydrogen atoms.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Types of Molecules
  • Organelles and Cells
  • Tissues
  • Organs and Organ Systems

Chapter 4: Characteristics of Living Organisms

A recently deceased human being has the same form as a living human being, but there is a basic difference between the two bodies. Living organisms have lives, are composed of cells, require energy, expand, multiply, and react to their surroundings. While a dead body has cells, they do not use resources or perform any activities associated with life, such as development or reproduction.

Chapter 5: A Recap

Matter is made up of atoms, which are in turn made up of subatomic particles. Molecules are formed when two or more atoms join together. Organelles, or cell components, are made up of various types of molecules. Tissues are made up of similar cells that have been grouped together. Tissues combine to form cells, which collaborate to form organ systems. A living body is made up of all of the organ systems working together.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Understanding Homeostasis
  • Negative Feedback Systems

Lesson 2: The Human Cell

Chapter 1: Introduction

The composition and role of the cell will be discussed in this lecture. A human adult has trillions of them, and each one is a feat of innovation in and of itself. Cells have a variety of structures, but most are so thin that they cannot be seen without a microscope. The cell is the smallest living unit of the body, just as the atom is the smallest total unit of matter.

Chapter 2: The Cell's Membranes: Structure and Function

The cell membrane maintains the cell's integrity. It shields its contents from the outside world. The cell membrane is made up of double layers of phospholipid molecules. This bilayer's two outer surfaces draw water, while its two inner surfaces repel it. The polar ends are the outer ends of molecules that can bear an electric charge.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Transportation of Materials

Chapter 3: Inside the Cell

Although the organelles in various tissues differ greatly, their mechanisms and functions are identical. The nucleus, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, lysosomes, and mitochondria will all be analyzed. It may also discuss cilia and flagella, which are fibers formed from a cell's cytoskeleton.

Chapter 4: Cell Division

The majority of cells are very thin. This is significant because cells rely on diffusion to transfer oxygen and nutrients within their protoplasm. If the distances these molecules must cover are too great, the inner areas of the cell will die and suffer from oxygen starvation. Waste removal will be problematic as well.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Interphase: Premitosis
  • Prophase: Phase I
  • Metaphase: Phase II
  • Anaphase: Phase III
  • Telophase: Phase IV
  • Cytokinesis: Phase V

Chapter 5: Cancer: Development of Tumors

Cells, like factories, have quality control processes in operation. During cell division, the cell scans for complications that could result in dysfunctional cells on a regular basis. It ensures that exact copies of genes are created and that spindle fibers work properly. If the damage is irreversible, the cell dies by apoptosis.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Causes of Cancer
  • Cancer Treatment
  • Prevention

Lesson 3: Understanding Heredity

Chapter 1: Introduction to Heredity

If a person has an identical twin, any person on the planet has chromosomes that are unlike everyone else's. Nonetheless, humans are more alike than they realize. In reality, 99.9 percent of everyone's genetic material is similar. The 0.1 percent variation in their DNA accounts for all of the diversity among the billions of humans on the planet.

Chapter 2: How Genes Function

Genes are segments of these DNA threads that provide the instructions for creating all of the various substances and structures in our bodies. Genes often direct the creation of a new organism from a single fertilized cell, provide instructions for that organism's growth and maturation, allow cell repair, and control all of the processes associated with life.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Step 1: DNA contains the code to build proteins
  • Step 2: DNA transfers the code to a messenger RNA molecule
  • Step 3: mRNA leaves the nucleus and attaches to a ribosome
  • Step 4: tRNA brings amino acids to the ribosome
  • Step 5: Amino acids link together
  • Step 6: Ribosome releases the protein
  • Introns and Exons
  • Gene Activation

Chapter 3: Inheritance of Traits: Meiosis

This chapter will look at how the reproductive cells (gametes) divide again in order to produce a fertilized egg. It'll explain that they must have half the number of chromosomes of the rest of the body's cells. Meiosis is the process of separation that causes sperm and egg cells to have the right number of chromosomes.

Chapter 4: Patterns of Inheritance

Any of these biological rules were discovered by Gregor Mendel, a Roman Catholic monk who lived in central Europe from 1822 to 1884. He established hypotheses of how behaviors are passed on by families. He has been dubbed "The Father of Genetics" for his contributions to our understanding of inheritance patterns.

Chapter 5: Genetic Disorders

While Gregor Mendel's genetic theories were published in 1866, they were largely forgotten until 1900. Cell division was not observed by biologists until the 1890s, when improved microscopes were invented. They began to take Mendel's work seriously and recognized that his assumptions regarding succession were right.

Lesson 4: The Nervous System

Chapter 1: Introduction

The brain, spinal cord, and all of the nerves within and outside of those systems comprise this system. It has three essential functions: it receives sensory input from all areas of the body, processes it, and stimulates muscles and glands to transfer or secrete substances. They may also partake in cognitive tasks, or reasoning processes, thanks to the nervous system.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems
  • PNS: Voluntary and Autonomic Subsystems

Chapter 2: Autonomic Subsystem: Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Division

The parasympathetic nervous system is made up of nerves that originate in the brain and the lowest portion of the spinal cord, the sacrum. This system's impulses appear to slow us down. The sympathetic system's nerves emerge from the spinal cord's lung, thoracic, and lower back, lumbar, areas. When we are in a fight or flight condition, this device speeds us up and becomes extremely triggered.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Brain Stem
  • Thalamus and Hypothalamus
  • The Cerebellum
  • The Cerebrum

Chapter 3: Structure of Nerves

Nerves protrude from the spinal cord in the same way as main branches protrude from the trunk of a tree. However, each nerve is made up of thousands of individual cells known as neurons. From the main branch, smaller and smaller branches of neurons emerge, before every muscle fiber, blood vessel, and gland is linked to a neuron.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Neurons of the Peripheral Nervous System
  • Neurons of the Central Nervous System
  • Structure of Neurons
  • Neuroglia

Chapter 4: The Reflex Arc

Reflex arcs allow muscles to contract incredibly rapidly in order to shield people from injury. They don't have to wait for a warning to reach the brain for examination before fleeing from something extremely painful. The discomfort is generally beneficial.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Synapse
  • The Nervous Impulse
  • The Role of the Brain

Chapter 5: Disorders of the Nervous System

Since neurons cannot differentiate, they do not regenerate as they die. When an accident or infection destroys or severely affects enough nerves, a person's ability to absorb and react to sensory input suffers. Disease may also damage neuroglia cells, so we'll start with a disease that attacks the neuroglia cells that generate myelin.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Alzheimer's Disease
  • Brain Tumors
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Brain Injuries
  • Peripheral Neuropathy

Lesson 5: The Skeletal System

Chapter 1: Introduction to the Skeletal System

Living cells in bones are surrounded by nonliving extracellular material. Each cell has its own little room, much like its own apartment.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Functions of the Skeletal System
  • Types of Bones

Chapter 2: Types of Joints

Since fibrous joints are bound by thick connective tissue that makes very little mobility, they are either immobile or only partially movable. Sutures bind the flat bones in the skull, which is an example of a fibrous joint. The radius and ulna bones of the forearm both form a fibrous joint, although they are further apart than the bones that form sutures.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of Synovial Joints

Chapter 3: Axial and Appendicular Skeletons

The skeleton, like the nervous system, is divided into two sections: the axial skeleton and the appendicular skeleton. The bones that support the head, spine, and trunk comprise the axial skeleton. The skull, the vertebral spine, the lungs, and the breastbone are among them.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Skull
  • The Vertebral Column
  • The Thoracic Cage
  • Appendicular Skeleton

Chapter 4: Anatomy of a Long Bone

The bone's shaft is called the diaphysis. It is a hollow tube made mainly of thick compressed bone. The medullary cavity, which is located inside the diaphysis, contains red or yellow bone marrow.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Bone as Connective Tissue
  • The Bone Matrix
  • Cancellous and Compact Bone Tissue
  • Blood-Making Cells

Chapter 5: Bone and Joint Disorders

This final chapter on the skeletal system would go through some of the most serious bone and joint conditions that can cause problems for people. Most individuals, for example, experience osteoarthritis to a degree as they age.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Scoliosis

Lesson 6: The Muscular System

Chapter 1: Introduction

 Muscle tissue is one of the four major groups of tissues in the body, and there are three types of muscle tissue: skeletal, smooth, and cardiac. Smooth muscle is located in the organ walls, while cardiac muscle is found in the heart. Remember that the autonomic nervous system controls both heart and smooth muscle, while the voluntary nervous system controls skeletal muscle.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Muscle Tissue
  • Muscle Function

Chapter 2: Muscle Anatomy

The muscle belly, the main part of the muscle, contains thousands of individual muscle fibers, or cells. Muscle fibers are bundled together in coils analogous to how nerves are arranged in a nerve. However, since muscle fibers remain within the muscle belly, it could be more useful to think of them as straws packed together in this situation.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • A Movement of the Upper Limb

Chapter 3: Concentric and Eccentric Contractions

The biceps and brachialis used a concentric contraction as people bent their elbow. As muscle fibers are activated, they shorten and bring the bones closely together. A joint's angle is reduced as a result of this. Eccentric contractions are widely used.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • A Movement of the Lower Limb
  • Abdominal Muscles
  • Back and Neck Muscles

Chapter 4: The Motor Unit

When muscles contract, the nervous and neural systems collaborate. The spinal cord is the origin of motor nerves, which carry signals to skeletal muscles. Their axons communicate with individual muscle fibers through branches. They will branch a few or thousands of times, regulating a few or thousands of muscle fibers.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Motor Memory
  • Shortening of the Muscle Fibers

Chapter 5: Injuries to the Muscular System

The muscle system is particularly vulnerable to athletic or overuse injuries, but our bodies have an unusual way of defending it. Tendons are the structures that attach muscles to bones. They have sensory systems called Golgi tendon organs located in them. These monitor the amount of tension on the tendon.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Tendonitis
  • Muscle Strain
  • Bruising
  • Acute Compartment Syndrome
  • Myositis Ossificans
  • Muscle Atrophy

Lesson 7: The Respiratory System

Chapter 1: Introduction

Respiration actually corresponds to four distinct processes. Different scholars use different terminology to describe the same systems. When they breathe, air flows into and out of their lungs. That would be referred to as ventilation. Then there is a gas exchange between the air in the lungs and the blood, mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide. This is known as external respiration.

Chapter 2: The Nose

When a human inhale, air typically reaches their respiratory system through their nostrils. The nasal cavities are reached through the nostrils. They are separated by a septum in the nasal cavity. The septum's backbone is composed of bone, but the front section is made of cartilage. This gives it a lot of leeway.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Moving on Down
  • And on into the Lungs

Chapter 3: Ventilation

The scientific term for the actual process of drawing air into and moving it out of the lungs is ventilation.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Pleura
  • Inspiration
  • Expiration

Chapter 4: External Respiration

External respiration is the next step in the process. This is the gas exchange in the alveoli, the small balloons at the ends of the airways.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Internal Respiration
  • Cellular Respiration
  • The Brain's Role

Chapter 5: Disorders of the Respiratory System

The respiratory system is continually vulnerable to bacteria, but humans have several systems in place to shield them from respiratory illnesses. The common cold is the most common and least dangerous, but it can escalate to something more severe in people with poor health.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Bronchitis
  • Pneumonia
  • Tuberculosis
  • Asthma

Lesson 8: The Circulatory System

Chapter 1: Introduction

The circulatory system is made up of the heart and all of the blood vessels in the body. The heart is a living organ that pumps blood into 60,000 miles of spinning and rotating blood vessels. It beats about 100,000 times every 24 hours, never stopping.

Chapter 2: The Heart

Broken heart, heart ache, rubbed the heart—all expressions that demonstrate how much the heart is synonymous with feeling. And heart symbols are frequently used to signify love, especially romantic love. The brain is the true center of human emotions, but the heart is also a remarkable organ. It's a pump that's more powerful and long-lasting than anything man has ever made.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of the Heart
  • The Heart's Electrical System
  • The Heart's Blood Vessels

Chapter 3: Path of Human Blood

Remember that, with the exception of the pulmonary arteries, an artery is a kind of blood vessel that transports oxygenated blood. The aorta, which has several branches, is the largest trunk. These branches thin out until they are thin-walled capillaries that cause molecules to diffuse in and out.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Major Blood Vessels
  • Anatomy of Blood Vessels

Chapter 4: Functions of Blood

Blood acts as a delivery medium by transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide. However, these are not the only compounds that blood transports. Blood takes up nutrients from the food we consume in the small intestine and transports them to where they are needed. In addition to carbon dioxide, blood sucks up other waste materials and transports them to the kidneys.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Blood Composition
  • Red Blood Cells
  • White Blood Cells
  • Platelets

Chapter 5: Diseases of the Circulatory System

Circulatory system diseases injure more individuals than any other disorder. It's important to understand these two conditions because they can arise without any apparent symptoms.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Coronary Artery Disease

Lesson 9: The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease

Chapter 1: Introduction

Each of the organ systems is known by two separate names. Because of its critical role in the body's battle against germs, the lymphatic system is often referred to as the immune system. This is referred to as immunological protection. However, the term immune system would not be used in this course because there is no such thing as an immune system with its own organs and structures.

Chapter 2: Structure and Function of the Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system has three primary functions: fluid balance in the bloodstream, fat absorption in the small intestine, and immunological protection.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Fluid Regulation
  • Lymph Nodes and Nodules
  • Movement of Lymph
  • Bone Marrow, the Thymus Gland, and the Spleen

Chapter 3: Staying Healthy

Cold viruses would kill so many cells that the organs would simply shut down. It could happen rapidly depending on how quickly the viruses multiplied.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Your First Line of Defense: The Skin
  • Mucous Membranes
  • Other First-Line Defenses
  • Inflammatory Response

Chapter 4: Specific Immunological Responses

When blood flows into the lymph nodes, the cells constantly search for the presence of foreign invaders. Remember that just about 10% of the body's fluid from blood is lymph, but that's enough to spot a trespasser. If one is found, the lymph node begins to produce more lymphocytes in order to fight off any potential infection.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Humoral Immunity
  • Cell-Mediated Immunity

Chapter 5: Allergies

When subjected to an allergen, some people respond very moderately, while others get very ill. Pollen, house dust, mold, and animal dander are all common allergens. Some individuals are allergic to specific foods, such as peanuts and eggs. Allergies to bug bites or specific drugs are also very common.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Autoimmune Diseases
  • Immune Deficiencies: Inherited and Acquired

Lesson 10: The Integumentary and Urinary Systems

Chapter 1: Introduction

The integumentary system is linked to the urinary system. Despite their distinct purposes, each of these devices serve to rid the bodies of waste materials. Since urine exits the body, this is a fairly clear feature of the urinary system, but it is a less obvious function of the integumentary system.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Skin
  • Temperature Regulation, Waste Removal, and Vitamin D
  • Sensation

Chapter 2: The Integumentary System

The integumentary structure is made up of three layers of skin, one on top of the other, as well as appendages such as skin glands, hair, and nails. Blood vessels, sensory receptors, nerves, hair follicles, and tiny muscles such as arrector pili run along its middle segment, together with these structures.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Epidermis
  • Downward to the Dermis
  • The Hypodermis
  • Hair
  • Fingernails and Toenails
  • Skin Glands

Chapter 3: The Urinary System and Its Functions

The kidneys, ureters, intestine, and urethra are the four primary components of the urinary system. They comprise the main waste removal scheme. Per day, the kidneys filter approximately 400 gallons (1,400 liters) of blood. They produce urine during the process, but they still have other important tasks to complete.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of the Urinary System

Chapter 4: The Nephron

Pressure filtration, partial reabsorption, tubular secretion, and water reabsorption are the four stages in the process of washing the blood and producing urine.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Step 1: Pressure Filtration
  • Step 2: Selective Reabsorption
  • Step 3: Secretion
  • Step 4: Reabsorption of Water

Chapter 5: Kidney Failure

The inability of the kidneys to remove waste materials from the blood is referred to as kidney failure. Acute renal failure (ARF) is characterized by a sudden loss of kidney function. Chronic renal failure (CRF) is characterized by a progressive loss of kidney function. Both environments endanger life and waste materials are toxic to the body.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Acute Renal Failure
  • Chronic Renal Failure
  • Dialysis
  • Kidney Transplantation

Lesson 11: The Digestive System

Chapter 1: Introduction

So much of the wrong kind of diet can also lead to Type 2 diabetes, a major risk factor for high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. Obesity has an effect on any aspect of the body and can make daily life challenging. Since the skeleton needs to carry the extra weight, it can also cause joint and spine injuries. However, not having enough food is also harmful.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • An Overview

Chapter 2: Nutrition: The Big and the Small of It

Mothers nag, and children refuse, but eating a well-balanced diet is critical. The body needs the correct balance of nutrients, which are the substances found in food that provide nutrition and aid in cell function. It is possible to be both overweight and malnourished.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Macronutrients
  • Micronutrients

Chapter 3: Open Up and Say Ahhh!

The entire digestion process consists of several stages, and this topic is divided into three parts. It will begin with the mouth, pharynx, and esophagus. It would then accompany the dinner into the intestine. Finally, it will investigate what happens in the small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. The digestion phase is not always pleasant, but it is essential for the body to survive.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Mouth, Pharynx, and Esophagus
  • The Stomach
  • The Small Intestine, Large Intestine, and Rectum

Chapter 4: A Look Back

When an individual was mummified in ancient Egypt, the liver was held in canopic jars guarded by the four sons of Horus and Isis. In Greek mythology, Zeus, on the other hand, ordered an eagle to pluck Prometheus' liver because the titan had brought humankind fire. People today may not have such warm feelings for this organ, but it, along with the gallbladder and pancreas, plays many important roles in digestion.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Anatomy of the Liver
  • Liver Function
  • The Gallbladder
  • The Pancreas

Chapter 5: Heartburn

Perhaps the muscle does not close completely or relaxes when it does not. When this occurs, stomach acid, and even food, backs up towards the esophagus. This is known as acid reflux. Along with discomfort, acid reflux signs can include a sore throat, hoarseness, chronic cough, a lump in the throat, and a sour or acid taste in the mouth.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Peptic Ulcers
  • Colon Cancer

Lesson 12: The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems

Chapter 1: Introduction

The endocrine system is made up of a series of glands that secrete chemicals that have a significant impact on our body's tissues. The reproductive system is aptly named; it encourages humans to replicate and create new members of their genus.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Function of the Endocrine System

Chapter 2: Major Glands and Their Hormones

The hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pineal body, thyroid, parathyroids, pancreas, adrenal glands, and ovaries in females and testes in males are all important endocrine system glands. The hypothalamus, pituitary, and pineal glands are situated in the brain; the thyroid and parathyroid glands are located in the front portion of the lower neck; the pancreas is located below the stomach; and the adrenal glands are located on top of each kidney. The ovaries are found in the pelvis in females, and the testes are located outside the body in the scrotum in males.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Endocrine Glands of the Brain
  • Other Major Glands

Chapter 3: Introduction to Reproduction

The new organism begins with a single genetically unique cell that rapidly multiplies to produce several different types of cells. Some cells form nervous tissue, others form kidney tissue, still others form blood cells, still others form muscle and bone, and so on. Except for medically aided fertilization, this development normally occurs in an ordered and predictable manner and starts with the pleasurable act of sexual intercourse.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • The Penis
  • Testes and Scrotum
  • Accessory Glands
  • Ejaculation

Chapter 4: Male vs. Female

All is aware that males and females vary greatly. This distinction begins at conception, when the male embryo receives the XY chromosome pair and the female embryo receives the XX chromosome pair. Male and female embryos appear the same before the seventh week of conception. Male embryos begin to develop testes at this stage, while female embryos begin to form ovaries.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Ovaries and Fallopian Tubes
  • The Uterus
  • Vagina and External Genitalia
  • Female Hormonal Cycle

Chapter 5: Two Common Disorders

Endometriosis is a term used to describe two common diseases, one affecting the endocrine system and the other involving the female reproductive system. These two mechanisms may be affected by a wide range of disorders. The male reproductive system may also be problematic.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Diabetes
  • Endometriosis

Recognition & Accreditation

All students who complete the course receive a certificate of completion with a passing score (for the online assessment) and will be issued a certificate via email.

There are 12 units of study

Module 1: Introduction to the Living Processes

Our first lesson will introduce you to the fascinating subject of human anatomy and physiology. Since chemical reactions drive all of our bodies' functions, you will start by reviewing some basic chemistry. Finally, you will learn about homeostasis—that drive humans have to keep many different variables (like temperature and blood pressure) within a narrow range. By the time you're done with this lesson, you will be ready to learn more about the structure and function of our bodies.

Module 2: The Human Cell

The smallest living unit of the body is the cell. It's so amazing, it deserves a lesson of its own. Even though almost all cells are microscopic, they're jam-packed with many different kinds of organelles and surrounded by complex membranes.

Module 3: Understanding Heredity

This lesson tackles the subject of heredity. It's probably the most technical of all the lessons because it explores genetics. You will learn how genes determine your physical and mental characteristics, and how your parents' genetic material determine these traits. Then you will meet a man who lived in the 1800's—Gregor Mendel, the Father of Genetics—because his insights paved the way for our modern understanding of heredity.

Module 4: The Nervous System

This lesson introduces the nervous system. You will learn how it's organized, its different jobs, and the structures that make thinking, feeling, and moving possible. You will also learn how the nervous system works when we think we're in danger or we've suddenly been affected by physical pain. You will use your chemistry knowledge in this chapter in looking at how nervous impulses are transmitted. Finally, you will learn about nervous system disorders —what causes them and their effects.

Module 5: The Skeletal System

Our bones have several functions, and some aren't so obvious. For example, did you know that red blood cells are made in your bones? Or that bones store minerals that are essential for the function of your nerves and muscles? This lesson explores the structure and function of bones, different types of joints, and the amazing structure of your spinal column. You will learn about some common disorders of this system and what you can do to keep your bones strong.

Module 6: The Muscular System

Like the skeletal system, the muscular system is crucial for movement, but it has other functions, too. Muscles are also a lot more complicated than they appear. You will learn why even simple movements involve chemical reactions and a close coordination between this system and the nervous system. In the last chapter, you will learn about several common injuries to different parts of the muscular system.

Module 7: The Respiratory System

This lesson focuses on the respiratory system in this lesson. As you're probably aware, it's the group of organs that allow you to get that crucial substance—oxygen—to all the cells in our body. But your respiratory system has some other functions that this lesson touches on. You will learn about the anatomy of your respiratory organs and which muscles are crucial for breathing. You will also become aware of the differences between ventilation, external respiration, internal respiration, and cellular respiration.

Module 8: The Circulatory System

There's so much to learn about the circulatory system. This lesson explores the composition of blood, the various blood cells, and the different kinds of blood vessels in your body. Of course, the heart is a crucial part of the circulatory system, so you will learn about its chambers, valves, coronary vessels, and electrical system. You will learn how blood travels around the body and its important functions. You will finish this lesson knowing the importance of taking care of this organ system.

Module 9: The Lymphatic System and Fighting Disease

In today's very interesting lesson, you will learn all about the disease-fighting ability of your body. The human body also has a system of vessels (similar to blood vessels) called the lymphatic system. You will learn about its disease-fighting role as well as some of its other functions. You will learn about some of the other organs in your body that are involved in the battle against disease. This lesson concludes with the different ways the body's disease-fighting ability can be compromised and why sometimes the body turns on its own cells.

Module 10: The Integumentary and Urinary Systems

This lesson takes a closer look at two different organ systems—the integumentary system (the skin) and the urinary system. Both of these systems work to get rid of waste products that would kill you if they were allowed to build up in your body. You will learn, too, how important these two systems are in maintaining homeostasis. People are often surprised to learn how complex even the skin can be. And the structures of the urinary system, particularly the kidneys, are quite amazing. At the end of this lesson, you will know all about kidney failure and the challenges of dialysis and kidney transplantation.

Module 11: The Digestive System

You might not think about food the same way after this lesson on the digestive system. This lesson explores all the different structures involved with converting food into the chemicals our bodies need to grow, repair tissues, and carry on all the functions of life. When you finish this lesson, you will understand the value of eating a variety of foods, how good food choices will enhance your health, and about one of the most common kinds of cancer—colon cancer.

Module 12: The Endocrine and Reproductive Systems

This course concludes with a lesson on the endocrine and reproductive systems. You will learn how the endocrine and nervous systems work together to regulate all of your body's functions. Finally, you will explore some specific endocrine glands, the hormones they produce, and how they influence each other.

Entry requirements

Students must have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

Minimum education

Open entry. Previous schooling and academic achievements are not required for entry into this course.

Computer requirements

Students will need access to a computer and the internet.

Minimum specifications for the computer are:

Windows:

  • Microsoft Windows XP, or later
  • Modern and up to date Browser (Internet Explorer 8 or later, Firefox, Chrome)

All systems

  • Internet bandwidth of 1Mb or faster
  • Flash player or a browser with HTML5 video capabilities(Currently Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome)

Students will also need access the following applications:

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Note: This course is not suitable for Macintosh users.

1.  Who are Courses For Success?

Courses For Success is a global course platform that started in 2008 with 5 courses, since then we have grown to over 10,000 online courses. As our courses are delivered online via the internet, we sell our courses worldwide.

Our courses span across many categories including Academic, Animal, Beauty, Business, Career, Counseling, Creative & Media, Health & Therapy, Hobbies & Trades, IT, Personal Development, Sports & Fitness.

Some of the companies we work with include Groupon, Living Social, CNN, Entrepreneur, Mashable, Reed UK, Stack Social and many more.

2.  Is there a refund/cancellation policy?

Yes, we have a 7-day money-back refund guarantee. Just send us an email to email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com with the subject Courses For Success Refund so we can accommodate your request.

3.  What is the FREE Personal Success Training Program?

The Personal Success Training Program was developed by Courses For Success to help our customers achieve success. Currently, we are offering this program for FREE with every course or bundle purchase this month. This is a limited time offer! We have received thousands of reviews for this program, please see: Personal Success Training Program Reviews

4.  Are there any requirements to study this course?

No, anyone who has an interest in learning more about this subject matter is encouraged to take our course. There are no entry requirements to take this course.

5.  Do I require a High School Diploma or to have finished high school to complete this course?

No, you do not require a High School Diploma or to have finished school to study this course, this course is open to anyone who would like to take this course.

6.  What if English is not my first language?

This course is provided in English, however, due to the digital nature of our training, you can take your time studying the material and make use of tools such as google translate and Grammarly.

7.  Is this course online or conducted in person?

Yes, this course is online. Through well-crafted lessons, expert online instruction and interaction with your tutor, participants in this course gain valuable knowledge. You have the flexibility to study at your own pace combined with enough structure and support to complete the course. You can access the classroom 24/7 from anywhere with an Internet connection.

8.  How do I receive my course?

After you have completed payment, you will receive a confirmation email and tax receipt. You will also receive an email containing your course login details (username and password), as well as instructions on how to access and log in to your course via the internet with any device, please check your junk/spam folder in the event that you do not receive the email.

9.  When does this course start?

This is a self-paced course that can be started at anytime as long as you have internet access and a computer.

10.  What is online learning like?

Online learning is easy, if not easier than a traditional academic situation. By studying an online course, the usual boundaries caused by location and time constraints are eliminated, meaning you are free to study where and when you want at your own pace. Of course, you will need to be able to self-manage your time and be organized, but with our help, you’ll soon find yourself settling into a comfortable rhythm of study.

11.  What computer skills do I need for my course?

You don't need to be a computer expert to succeed with our online training, but you should be comfortable typing, using the internet and be capable of using common software (such as Microsoft word).

12.  How long will you have access to the online course?

You have unlimited access for 3 months. You may start and finish the course at your own time and learn at your own pace.

13.  How long will my course take?

Individual courses are very comprehensive and can take up to 24 hours to complete.

If you choose a course bundle, simply multiply the above hours by the number of courses included in the bundle.
For example:

  • 2 course bundle is 2 x 24 hours = 48 hours
  • 3 course bundle is 3 x 24 hours = 72 hours
  • 5 course bundle is 5 x 24 hours = 120 hours
  • 10 course bundle is 10 x 24 hours = 240 hours
14.  Is there tutor support available?

Yes, there is tutor support, a dedicated professional instructor is available via email, answering questions and providing feedback.

15.  What is included with the course?

The onetime fee includes all training materials, including online content, diagrams, videos if included, interactive instructions and quizzes, plus you will receive a certificate upon completion.

16.  Do I need to buy textbooks?

All the required material for your course is included in the online system, you do not need to buy anything else.

17.  Is the course interactive?

Yes, all our courses are interactive.

18.  Is there an assessment or exam?

Yes, you will be required to complete a multiple-choice test online at the end of your course, you can do this test as many times as you require.

19.  What type of certificate will I receive?

You will receive a Certificate of Completion that is applicable worldwide, which demonstrates your commitment to learning new skills. You can share the certificate with your friends, relatives, co-workers and potential employers. Also, include it in your resume/CV, professional social media profiles and job applications. 

Wendy Sue Hunt - 5 STAR REVIEW
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The term “Courses for Success” helped me in my current position to succeed. After completing the courses, I gave my manager the completion certificates. Recently I received a promotion too."
Valencia Marie Aviles - 5 STAR REVIEW
"I had a very good experience with my course. It has helped me to get multiple jobs and prepared me for almost everything I would need to know. The course was very informative and easy to understand and broken up perfectly to be done in a short amount of time while still learning a good amount! I would recommend Courses for Success to anyone trying to get abs certifications for job advancements, it is well worth it!"
ELENA GRIFFIN - 5 STAR REVIEW
"I have absolutely enjoyed the materials from Courses for Success. The materials are easy to understand which makes learning enjoyable. Courses for Success have great topics of interest which make you come back for more.
Thank you Courses for Success for being part of my learning journey and making education affordable!"

Our completion certificates are very valuable and will help you progress in your work environment and show employers how committed you are to learn new skills, you might even get a promotion.

20.  Will this course be credited by universities?

No, it is not equivalent to a college or university credit.

21.  Am I guaranteed to get a job with this certificate?

This course will give you the skills you need to help you obtain employment, but it’s up to you if you get the job or not.

22.  How will this course assist me with my career?

Studying and completing this course will show employers that you have the knowledge in this field, additionally you will gain more confidence in this area of expertise.

23.  How long is the certificate valid for?

The Certificates are valid for life and do not need renewing. 

24.  Can I take more than one course at a time?

Courses are studied online at your own pace and you are free to study as many or as few courses as you wish, we also offer online course bundles that allow you to save on additional courses so that you may get all the topics related to your training goals in one go. 

25.  What are the Payment Methods available? Is there a payment plan?

We accept payments via PayPal, Credit Card, Bank Transfer and Amazon Pay for the USA. For payment plans, we offer Sezzle for USA & Canada, Afterpay for Australia & New Zealand. *For faster transaction Credit Card payments are preferred. Please purchase online via our website course product page or contact us at email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com, to pay via bank transfer.

26.   Can I purchase for multiple people?

Yes, you can do this by purchasing individually via website or send us a request via email at email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com

27.   Can I request for an invoice before purchase?

Yes, you can request for an invoice via email at email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com

28.   Purchase for a gift?

Yes, you can purchase this course as a gift, simply send an email to email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com, with the course details and we can accommodate this.

29.   Can I create my own course bundle?

Yes, you can customize your own bundle. Please send us the complete list with the exact course link of the courses you'd like to bundle up via email email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com and we will create them for you. *Each course access, time of completion and certification varies depending on the course type.

30.   How will I contact Courses For Success if I have any questions?

You can contact our support team, at any time through live chat on our website, or email at email/info)(coursesforsuccess.com, or by calling one of our phone numbers depending on which country you are in. 

We provide a 7 Day Money Back Refund on all Courses

Special Offer

 

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The Personal Success Training Program Helps You Stay Focused To Achieve Your Goals!
Benefits:
  • How to layout a Success Plan.
  • Get where you want to be in life.
  • How to unclutter your mind to succeed.
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Features:
  • 12 month online access,  24/7 anywhere.
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Course Summary

Course ID: 007T8497
Delivery Mode: Online
Access: 3 months
Tutor Support: Yes
Time: 40 Hours
Duration: 24 Hours
Assessments: Yes
Qualification: Certificate

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